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Battlefields set for action

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first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces 2018 PHARE Funding to Support Affordable Housing Across Pennsylvania Human Services,  Infrastructure,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced recipients of a new round of funding for housing programs made available through the Pennsylvania Housing Affordability and Rehabilitation Enhancement (PHARE) fund. The governor named 137 housing and community development initiatives in 52 counties that will share a portion of the total $26.6 million in PHARE funding for fiscal year 2017-18. The PHARE fund is managed by the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency.“For many families today, too much of their paycheck goes to housing, leaving little for food, transportation and other necessities,” said Governor Wolf. “Housing that is affordable is critical for helping families and communities thrive. That’s why I’m so pleased to announce this funding that will be used to preserve and expand the amount of affordable housing available in our state and address unmet community revitalization efforts.”Funding for the PHARE program comes from three main sources. Since 2012, the program has received a portion of the impact fees collected from natural gas companies operating in the state with the goal of addressing the housing shortage caused by the impact of drilling. That is supplemented with two major new funding sources that include a portion of the realty transfer tax and money from the National Housing Trust Fund.Today’s PHARE funding is expected to produce the following results:9,269 individuals or families at risk of homelessness will receive rental or utility assistance;1,224 homes will be rehabilitated or repaired;803 new rental units will be created;23 new single-family homes will be constructed;128 sites will be acquired or prepared for the future construction of 131 homes;385 households will receive home purchase assistance; and10,245 households will receive case management, including legal services, financial education and foreclosure prevention resources.“I want to applaud all the local organizations that approached us with innovative proposals for how to best use this housing money in their communities,” said PHFA Executive Director and CEO Brian A. Hudson Sr. “When you look at the wide variety of projects being funded today, you have to be impressed with the many different ways these organizations are using their money to address local housing shortages and improve their communities.”PHFA staff reports that $20.5 million of the $26.6 million allocated today will be used to fund housing projects benefiting households with incomes below 50 percent of the area median income. This represents 77 percent of the awarded funding.A list of the proposals receiving PHARE funding, often referred to as the state’s Housing Trust Fund, is available at www.phfa.org/legislation/act105.aspx. See the fifth bullet for “Funding Announcements.”About PHFAThe Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency works to provide affordable homeownership and rental housing options for older adults, low- and moderate-income families, and people with special housing needs. Through its carefully managed mortgage programs and investments in multifamily housing developments, PHFA also promotes economic development across the state. Since its creation by the legislature in 1972, it has generated more than $13.7 billion of funding for more than 172,053 single-family home mortgage loans, helped fund the construction of 132,531 rental units, and saved the homes of more than 49,215 families from foreclosure. PHFA programs and operations are funded primarily by the sale of securities and from fees paid by program users, not by public tax dollars. The agency is governed by a 14-member board. SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img April 12, 2018last_img read more

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first_imgGovernor Wolf Announces Investments in 50 Multimodal Projects to Improve Safety, Mobility, Local Economies February 01, 2019 Infrastructure,  Press Release,  Transportation Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf announced today that 50 highway, bridge, transit, aviation, and bike and pedestrian projects in 23 counties were selected for $44.5 million in funding through the Multimodal Transportation Fund.“Transportation is critical to connecting communities and economies, and we are an important partner in bringing progress across the state,” Governor Wolf said. “These investments will improve overall mobility and safety while bolstering commercial projects.”Reflecting Governor Wolf’s and PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards’ commitment to improving locally owned infrastructure, several of the projects will also help local governments address bridges and roadways in need of repair or replacement.“Whether we’re making roadways more accessible to all means of travel or creating new connections for businesses investing in our communities, transportation is integral to our quality of life,” Richards said. “These projects will bring long-lasting improvements across the state.”PennDOT evaluated the applications and made selections based on such criteria as safety benefits, regional economic conditions, the technical and financial feasibility, job creation, energy efficiency, and operational sustainability.For more information about the program, visit www.penndot.gov and click on Multimodal Program under the “Projects & Programs” button.Allegheny County:McKees Rocks Community Development Corporation — $1.9 million for multimodal transportation and green infrastructure improvements and streetscapes including ADA-compliant sidewalks and crosswalks, curbing, bus lanes, pedestrian circulation, bike racks, infiltration cells, traffic signals, and new street lighting beginning at the intersection of Chartiers Avenue, Linden Avenue, and Furnace Street Ext., and extending northwest along the first block of Chartiers Avenue.Penn Hills Township — $3 million to repave and improve roadways throughout the township most in need of repair, complete ADA-compliant cut-outs and sidewalks, and make streets more accessible for bicycle traffic.Pittsburgh Arena Real Estate Development LP — $1.4 million for transportation improvements that will support the planned redevelopment of the former Civic Arena site in the City of Pittsburgh’s Lower Hill District, including the addition of a new roadway access point connecting New Street to Center Avenue as well as pedestrian, bike, and public transit improvements on Crawford and Center Avenues.Ross Township — $2.2 million for new sidewalks on Siebert Road from McKnight Road to Woodland Road and a second southbound left-turn lane on McKnight Road and additional receiving lane on Siebert Road.Sports & Exhibition Authority of Pittsburgh and Allegheny County — $650,000 for a new three-acre public open space providing improvements to intersection, public streetscape, new accessible pedestrian pathways, bicycle routes, bus stop, bikeshare station, stormwater management, energy-efficient lighting, and other public amenities.Armstrong County: Armstrong County — $764,755 for multi-municipal projects across the county, including paving in Parks Township; bridge replacement in Kittanning Township; traffic signal replacement in Leechburg, and road improvements in West Franklin.Berks County: Caernarvon Township — $208,854 to decrease the turning radius from Route 10 onto Shiloh Road and improve sight distances at the intersection.Bucks County: Plumstead Township — $607,175 for essential pedestrian safety improvements, including sidewalks, ADA-compliant features, and signalization at the intersection of Stump Road and Route 611 (Easton Road).Cambria County: Johnstown Redevelopment Authority — $2.7 million to construct an industrial connector road to connect the Johnstown Urban Industrial Park – a new 115-acre industrial park – to Iron Street.Centre County: Centre County — $2 million to replace two high-priority, poor-condition bridges in the county – Mill Street Bridge in Howard Borough and Railroad Street Bridge in Bellefonte Borough.Chester County:Chester County Airport — $1.8 million to extend the existing terminal building that was constructed in 1993 which will allow for the addition of a public terminal and new Fixed-Base Operator space and expansion of the parking and access way.Chester County Conference & Visitors Bureau — $204,284 to replace existingwayfinding road signage throughout Chester County, including fabrication, installation,and inspection of newly-designed signs.East Coventry Township — $2.6 million to signalize the Route 724/Peterman Road intersection; add left-turn lanes on all approaches; restrict left turns from Old Schuylkill Road to the Route 724 intersection; and install sidewalks along the east side of Peterman Road from Route 724 to Old Schuylkill Road and along Old Schuylkill Road to Spiece Road.East Fallowfield Township — $1 million for repairs to Mortonville Road, including embankment stabilization, drainage improvements, and roadway reconstruction.Honey Brook Borough — $100,000 for pedestrian improvements to Chestnut Street, including rehabilitation and reconstruction of sidewalks and curbs to ADA standards with street paving. The work will also direct stormwater toward existing inlets.Clearfield County:Brady Township — $330,775 to replace the Haag Road Bridge over Stump Creek with a culvert.Huston Township — $450,000 for roadway and pedestrian infrastructure improvements to improve vehicle circulation, pedestrian safety, and overall mobility on approximately 3.78 miles of Mountain Run Road (T-338).Penn Township — $272,672 to replace superstructure of the bridge over Bell Run, pave approaches to the bridge, aggregate for shoulders, install guiderail, and end transitions.Clinton County: Woodward Township — $175,000 to pave 1.98 miles of Croak Hollow Road (T-512).Huntingdon County: Mount Union Borough — $1.2 million to complete the Pennsylvania Avenue Linear Park Corridor as a multimodal transportation hub in the heart of town. The project will link the Mount Union Area School District and surrounding neighborhoods to the central business district on the southern side of the rail lines.Lancaster County:East Lampeter Township — $1.6 million to complete improvements that have been recommended in the Lincoln Highway Streetscape Plan targeting pedestrian and multimodal facilities, including the addition of a bicycle/pedestrian path on the south side of the highway, widening of the pedestrian sidewalk on the north side of the highway, and crosswalks at the signalized intersections.Property Investing and Management, Inc. — $2.2 million to improve existing roadways and construct new roadways along the Route 322 corridor in Ephrata Township and Ephrata Borough to directly facilitate the build-out of Ephrata Crossing, a mixed-use development project.Lehigh County:Borough of Slatington — $440,000 to realign and reconstruct the SR 0873 / Walnut Street intersection in the Borough of Slatington to be completed in conjunction with the Lehigh County Walnut Street Bridge replacement.Borough of Coopersburg — $1.2 million for traffic, bicycling, and pedestrian improvements to Main Street and East State Street, including ADA-compliant pedestrian crosswalks at two key intersections, 0.11 miles of curb, sidewalk, pedestrian lighting, signs, and pavement marking.Luzerne County:Avoca Borough — $1.6 million for improvements to the intersection of Main Street and McAlpine Street, including widening the southwest corner of the intersection to improve the right turn from McAlpine Street to Main Street.City of Wilkes-Barre — $250,000 to rehabilitate the bridge carrying Strauss Lane over Solomon Creek.Exeter Borough — $572,293 to restore and improve Route 1025 (Schooley Avenue) between Cedar Street and Susquehanna Avenue.Lehman Township — $472,615 for base repairs and paving on Old Route 115 from Jackson Road to Route 118.Pittston Township — $603,847 for improvements to the roadway and drainage to safely accommodate two-way traffic, improve the conveyance of stormwater, and improve the safety of roadways in the Township, including Baker Road, Chapel Road, and Upper and Lower Ridge Roads.Plains Township — $117,463 to redefine the access points to the newly proposed Wilkes-Barre Area School District High School, improving traffic flow and safety.West Hazleton — $1 million to replace the Jaycee Drive bridge over Black Creek in the Valmont Industrial Park.Mercer County:City of Hermitage — $345,541 to construct sidewalks along the east side of South Route 18 (Hermitage Road) between Linden Pointe Business Campus and Morefield Road and intersection improvements at Armstrong, Emilie, and Morefield Roads.City of Sharon — $1.3 to repave and improve multiple streets throughout the city, complete ADA-compliant cut-outs and sidewalks, and make these streets more accessible for commerce in the city.South Pymatuning Township — $261,585 for improvements to Wynnewood Drive, Kane Road, and Orangeville Road, including the removal and replacement of the current road surface; grinding, leveling, and repaving; replacement of the culverts, ditch, and berm areas of the roadway; and installation of new aggregate base to meet desired elevation on Wynnewood Drive.Mifflin County: Oliver Township — $700,000 for full roadway reconstruction of Kansas and School House Roads, consisting of roadway widening, replacement of undersized culverts, road base improvements, and road rehabilitation to improve the safety of the roadway network.Monroe County: Stroud Township — $521,616 to replace an existing steel beam stream crossing carrying Mervine Road (T-412) over Cherry Creek.Montgomery County:Lower Moreland Township — $1.2 million to replace a structurally deficient structure and widen the roadway along Red Lion Road to accommodate existing traffic volumes.New Hanover Township — $125,394 to widen Route 73 to provide a separate eastbound left-turn lane along with minor reprofiling of a vertical curve to improve sight distance, as well as the installation of a traffic control signal.Towamencin Township — $1 million to widen Route 63 (Forty Foot Road) to improve traffic flow, upgrade signals, and install ADA-compliant pedestrian amenities.Upper Moreland Township — $390,000 for roadway widening along Davisville Road to provide a dedicated northbound right-turn lane onto Byberry Road.Northampton County: Lower Saucon Township — $219,640 to replace Lower Saucon Road Bridge, a two-lane culvert-style bridge.Philadelphia County:City Avenue Special Services District — $626,386 for road and pedestrian safety improvements on City Avenue.City of Philadelphia, Streets Department — $1.1 million to restore four unique historic streets to improve multimodal access, ADA compliance, and boost economic development in historic districts: Camac Street’s wood pavers, Waverly Street’s iron slag block, and Mermaid Lane and Winston Road’s cubical granite block.Mural Arts Philadelphia — $68,128 to improve the safety and utilization of Wayne Junction, a multimodal hub, through the addition of public art.Pike County: Delaware Township — $626,897 to grade shoulders; superpave scratch and leveling; superpave wearing course; aggregate shoulder; prime coat; and line paint the entire length of Doolan Road and a portion of Park Road.Schuylkill County:County of Schuylkill — $674,720 for full depth reclamation, shoulder restoration, guiderail replacement, replacement or restoration of storm drainage features, and repaving of the park-and-ride lot on Airport Road.Kline Township — $211,667 to improve existing transportation infrastructure assets and enhance pedestrian safety through the repair of 13 sections of deteriorated highways used for residential, commercial, and industrial traffic throughout the township.Tioga County: County of Tioga — $1 million to extend the Pine Creek Rail-Trail (PCRT) to a trailhead in Wellsboro Borough, three miles south.Westmoreland County:Borough of Youngwood — $400,000 for improvements to the Route 119 corridor (3rd and 4th Streets), including new roadway, ADA-compliant sidewalks, ADA ramps brought to current standards, and state-of-the-art signals along both streets.City of Latrobe — $100,000 to enhance the safety and accessibility of three downtown railroad underpasses by replacing deteriorated sidewalks, installing curb ramps, cleaning and painting steel I-beams and railings, and updating lighting.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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MiFID II: Pension funds share their thinking about investment research

first_imgInvestment research provisions in the newly-introduced MiFID II regime will have a varied impact on pension funds, according to interviews with a number of European investors. The new regulation, which came into effect on Wednesday, means asset managers can no longer acquire investment research for free from providers such as investment banks and brokerage firms and pass it on to clients.  For the first time, an explicit price needs to be put on research, leading to a challenging ‘price discovery’ process.Pension funds with internal teams that acquire research directly from investment banks have, like asset managers, been engaged in this process, and have limited resources for acquiring research at a cost.   Markus Schaen, senior fund manager at Dutch fiduciary manager MN, said: “Budget constraints will likely mean that our internal teams will have to make choices and will have, as a result, access to the research from a lower number of parties under MiFID II.”  “Many of their brokers – the more traditional sell side ones – have indicated that they will charge our teams for access to research and other resources under MiFID II. The parties are currently negotiating on the price for access,” he added.  Investment research: changes ahead as MiFID II kicks inRasmus Bessing, director at PFA Asset Management, the asset management division of Danish pension fund PFA, said it was very hard to foresee to what extent MiFID II’s research cost ‘unbundling provision will change the research landscape.  It was not unlikely, however, that it would lead to fewer providers of research, he added.  “We foresee that we will continue to to use external research,” said Bessing. “However, when the new rules come into force, we will monitor the cost associated with investment research. We believe MiFID II should not lead to increased costs overall, and we will make sure that the cost of research paid for explicitly results in lower execution cost.”A survey carried out by the buy-side division of the International Capital Market Association in October found that 83% of respondents thought they would use fewer research providers once the new regulatory regime came into effect. The survey was focussed on research about fixed income, currencies and commodities.  According to MN’s Schaen, pension fund teams responsible for manager selection and monitoring should be affected by MiFID II to a more limited extent.  “We have used research on stocks and companies provided by sell-side firms, but to a limited extent, and we plan to continue as is.” Tony Persson, acting head of investment management at Alecta“It looks like the vast majority of [asset managers] will not charge us for access to research under MiFID II and will absorb the cost themselves”, he said.Virtually all asset managers have ended up signalling they will not pass on the additional cost to clients – a survey conducted by IPE last month identified only two of the top 120 European asset managers as planning to pass on the charges to clients.But MiFID II may lead to pressure on firms to reduce money spent on research, according to Schaen.“This can be achieved by lowering the number of analysts and replacing more experienced but more expensive analysts with cheaper junior analysts,” he said. “[…] In any case, this will harm coverage of the market. Fewer analysts will look at a given company, which is especially true for companies that carry a smaller index weight, and less time will be spent on a company, which should lead to lower-quality analysis.”Alecta, the Swedish pension fund, is not a heavy user of third party-research, according to Tony Persson, its acting head of investment management.“We have used research on stocks and companies provided by sell-side firms such as brokers and investment banks, but to a limited extent,” he told IPE. ”We plan to continue as is. “Research material is acquired without middlemen directly from our counterparty as we manage all our assets internally. We have never had to pay explicitly or implicitly for this research. All investment decisions are guided by our own internal analysis.”There is widespread consensus, however, that MiFID II will change the landscape of investment research provision. A June 2017 report by McKinsey estimated that for European asset managers that decide to pay for research in full, profits could be reduced by as much as 15-20%. “The resulting change to research operations will be enormous,” said the report.For more coverage of the impact of MiFID II on investment research, see this month’s report on investment research and this month’s On the Record interviewslast_img read more

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​Swedish pension funds slam draft IORP II solvency rules

first_imgThe funds called for the regulator to:Remove the general due diligence deduction for market rates and replace it with a realistic credit risk deduction;The FSA should retain the prevailing forward rate if the current model for calculating the discount rate curve is kept; andAn overall adjustment of the capital requirement should be made to correspond to the level set by the legislature.Wessén also said the higher capital requirements for unit-linked insurance in the proposal reduced the scope for low fee levels. “This has a negative impact on pensions,” she said.The funds opted to make a consultation response as a group because their industry association, Insurance Sweden, had no overall position on the solvency rules for traditional insurance.In its response, meanwhile, Insurance Sweden said it was critical of many parts of the proposed regulation.It said insurance technical provisions, capital base and capital requirements had to be seen as a whole, but the FSA had not made any assessment of the overall effect of the solvency regulation.“In our view, the proposals lead to a marked tightening of requirements,” it said. However, it voiced support for several of the proposed methods for calculating capital requirements and for a review of capital requirements.The association said collective bargaining parties should not need to have to agree on what information should be provided to the insured.“The current way of providing occupational pension information works well and should not be changed,” it said.“Finansinspektionen’s proposal contains a lot of ambiguities that need to be addressed in future work,” Insurance Sweden said. “This applies to the obligation to provide information to the insured, the requirements of the annual report and the reporting requirements.”Last week, occupational pensions association Tjänstepensionsförbundet, whose members include government pension fund Kåpan Pension, banking sector scheme SPK and insurers’ pension fund FPK, responded to the regulatory plan saying the rules would lead to funds having to undertake too much administrative work, pushing up costs. Three of Sweden’s largest pension funds have criticised draft solvency rules within the regulation to implement IORP II.Folksam, AMF and Alecta issued a joint response to the Swedish FSA’s draft IORP II solvency rules, warning of the potential impacts on traditional defined benefit (DB) pensions.The providers said the new rules – which were put out for consultation by the FSA (Finansinpektionen) on 8 July – would negatively affect both pension savers and employers.Ylva Wessén, Folksam’s acting group chief executive, said: “Finansinspektionen’s proposal for solvency regulation risks leading to significantly lower pensions for the beneficiaries and also to large cost increases for employers.”last_img read more

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My Reno: See the surprise behind this historic Queenslander’s facade

first_img BEFORE: The front of the house at 30 Harris St, Hawthorne, before the renovation. AFTER: The front of the house after the renovation.Fortunately, their award-winning architect, Shaun Lockyer, agreed.So, instead of raising the house and building underneath, they dug out the ground floor.Ms Miedecke said they had a “dream run” as far as renovations go, having only needed to move out and rent nearby for nine months before moving back in.They also managed to secure the same builder who had just finished Mr Lockyer’s own house, Bruce Wales.“At that point in time, we weren’t sure if we were having kids or not and we just had a puppy, so (Shaun) encouraged us to renovate the house so it would suit a couple, as well as a family,” Ms Miedecke said.“I actually fell pregnant while we had moved out and so was 16 weeks pregnant when we moved back in and then had a second baby.”The original house was in good condition, so they decided to leave it as it was, aside from painting and repolishing the timber floors, and reopening the hallway so you could walk straight through the centre of the house.“It was pale pink and green and had some lemon and blue inside, the bathroom was falling off the back of the house and the deck had holes in it and you had to put a table over the holes so you didnt’t fall through the deck!” Ms Miedecke said.This part of the house features a front veranda, three bedrooms and a living area with sliding doors that open up to an 8m-high void above the kitchen. BEFORE: The kitchen in the house at 30 Harris St, Hawthorne, before the renovation. AFTER: The kitchen in the house at 30 Harris St, Hawthorne, after the renovation.They decided to knock down the post-war extension at the back of the house and install a new, modern one that really separates the front from the back.The hallway continues through the original house and connects to the new extension via a sliding wall. “Tradies walk through the old part of the house and go; ‘Wow!’,” Ms Miedecke said.“I like the fact it is a surprise every time you walk through to the back.”The original kitchen has been converted to the main bathroom.Upstairs, there is an open-plan study leading through to a master suite, which includes a walk-in wardrobe, ensuite, bedroom and Juliette balcony surrounded by timber slats for privacy. Downstairs from the middle level is the open-plan dining, lounge and kitchen, featuring an ILVE oven with gas cooktop, a mirrored splashback, Solar DOM LG convection microwave, stone benchtops, timber cabinetry and a large breakfast bar.Stacked sliding glass doors open out from this space to an entertainment area, featuring a paved barbecue and dining area, a 20m, magnesium lap pool and a low-maintenance lawn. And from the kitchen, there is access to a powder room, laundry and double garage. BEFORE: The living room in the house at 30 Harris St, Hawthorne, before the renovation. AFTER: The living area of the house at 30 Harris St, Hawthorne, after the renovation.Other notable features include a cubby house, garden beds with a watering system, a 7500-litre rainwater tank and a six-kilowatt solar electricity system.“We wanted to achieve a house that still looked good in 10 years time,” Ms Miedecke said. “We wanted people to walk in and not know when it was renovated. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus10 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market10 hours ago“It’s modern, but classic at the same time, with simple finishes that should stand test of time.” Mr Behrens and Ms Miedecke are selling to move on to their next renovation project.“We’ve had a great 10 years living in this house,” Ms Miedecke said.“It’s been fantastic for entertaining; great for parties and young kids.“We’ll miss the street … and we’ll miss coming home to a Queenslander.” BEFORE: The back of the house at 30 Harris St, Hawthorne, before the renovation. BEFORE: The back deck on the house at 30 Harris St, Hawthorne, before the renovation. BEFORE: The backyard before the renovation. AFTER: The backyard has been put to better use since the renovation. The property is being marketed by Sarah Hackett and Charmaine McDonald of Place Bulimba and is scheduled for auction at 11am on Saturday, February 29. RENO FACT CHECKTime taken: 12 monthsTotal spend: $950,000 The back of the house at 30 Harris St, Hawthorne, after the renovation.WHEN Nick Behrens opens his birthday present this Sunday, he’ll be treated to 10 years of treasured memories in one picture frame.Anna Miedecke’s gift to her husband this year is a painting of the first house they ever bought together — the home they renovated and raised their two children and beloved dog in.The couple bought the 1897 Queenslander at 30 Harris St, Hawthorne, a decade ago after falling in love with its old-world facade. “We had tried really hard to buy a house in Stuart Street adjacent to this one, but we lost that one,” Ms Miedecke said. “The agent showed us this one and we just loved the way it looked from the street.“So when we were successful in purchasing it, we knew the best thing to do was not to change the way it looked from the street.” center_img The owners will be hosting a special open home today, Sunday, February 23, at 12.30pm.last_img read more

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Batesville Memorial Pool opens this weekend

first_imgBatesville, Ind. — The Batesville Memorial Pool opens Saturday, May 27. The pool features a 13-foot deep diving portion and a waterslide.Residents can also book a private party at the pool. Parties include access to the main pool, diving and slide pool and the splash pad area during non-business hours. First two hours with five certified lifeguards is $150, additional hours are $75-per-hour.For a pool rental application go online to batesvilleindiana.us/departments/parks-recreation/memorial-pool/rental-request/.last_img read more

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Regular season kicks off at RPM

first_imgBy Mike HughesHAYS, Kan. (April 9) – After a very successful Sunflower Classic two weeks ago, the regular points season got underway at RPM Speedway in Hays, KS, Saturday evening, April 9.The NAPA Auto Parts/Gib’s Auto Supply IMCA Modified feature had the wildest finish of the night.  Danny Morrison led the opening lap before Dylan Sherfick took the lead. Sherfick appeared to have the race well in hand until a caution on the final lap for a spinning car set up a one-lap shootout to the finish.Sherfick led the field back to green, trailed by Morrison and Tyler Frye. As the field headed into turn two on the final lap, Frye shot around Morrison for second, dove under Sherfick in turns three and four and made it stick, then held on to the checkers by a car length.Morrison was third, followed by Clay Money and Steven Bowers Jr.Chad Sterling was the Advantage Glass Plus IMCA Stock Car winner. Daniel Gottschalk was the third and final leader in the Golden B Hydra Drilling IMCA Northern Sport Mod main event.The 20-lap Golden Plains Trucking IMCA Hobby Stock feature was close from green to checkered and ended with Eric Cross in victory lane. Jakob Schwein topped the Cutting Edge Collision IMCA Sport Compact feature.last_img read more

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3 takeaways from Syracuse’s 56-34 loss to Louisville

first_img Published on November 23, 2019 at 7:45 pm Contact Josh: jlschafe@syr.edu | @Schafer_44 LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Syracuse (4-7, 1-6 Atlantic Coast) couldn’t escape an early deficit and lost 56-34 to Louisville on Saturday at Cardinal Stadium. The Orange trailed 21-3 in the first quarter and would never bring the margin closer than 11 in a loss that takes a bowl game out of their hands. Louisville (7-4, 5-3) out-gained Syracuse 608 yards to 510 yards and scored on four of its six second half drives in the shootout. Here are three takeaways from the Orange’s loss.Football game or track meet?Seven of the game’s 12 touchdowns came from 20 yards or more. At times, the football game between the 107th- and 115th-worst defenses in the country looked more like a track meet. The Cardinals finished the game averaging 21.6 yards per completion while running back Javian Hawkins ran 23 times for 233 yards and a touchdown. The long plays came from every fashion. Louisville quarterback Micale Cunningham ran for one, a 20-yard quarterback keeper, and threw for five more — including a 90-yard touchdown launch to wide receiver Tutu Atwell. Syracuse had its share of explosive plays too. Some came from the usual suspect Trishton Jackson, who finished with three catches for 64 yards, but they also came from the unexpected. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFreshman running back Jawhar Jordan, who suited up for Syracuse for the fourth time this year, returned three kicks for 101 yards and added 87 yards receiving as a part of his 223 total yards. Taking it all awayA dropped punt shifted Syracuse’s final chance at controlling its own bowl destiny. On Louisville’s first possession, the Cardinals drove down and scored on the kind of dominating drive that looked like it’ll continue all day. That wasn’t the case though, at least not initially. On the next series, Syracuse stopped Louisville short of a first down on three straight plays but Syracuse receiver Sean Riley dropped the ensuing punt. The Cardinals scooped possession, and instead of Syracuse retaining the ball down 7-3, Louisville had the ball 43 yards further up the field. On the next play, Cunningham connected with Seth Dawkins for a 29-yard touchdown pass. On the Cardinals next possession, Syracuse had a chance to make up for its giveaway. As Alton Robinson clobbered Cunningham and the ball soared deep, two Syracuse players had a chance at an interception. But Antwan Cordy and Evan Foster collided and the ball bounced on the turf. Four plays later, Louisville ran in its third first-quarter touchdown. Close but no cigar Syracuse hung around with Louisville for most of the night but couldn’t finish when it had opportunities to change momentum. The first chance of the second half to alter the game’s outcome came on an onside kick. Holder Nolan Cooney, replacing an injured Sterling Hofrichter, nearly executed a perfect onside kick. Cooney pounded the ball into the ground and chased after the kick himself. It looked like he recovered it right at the 10-yard marker that would make the kick legal. Upon review, the referees ruled that a Syracuse player illegally blocked a Louisville player and a re-kick granted the Cardinals possession. Still, Syracuse had its chances in the fourth quarter. With the ball deep in the Louisville zone and a 4th-down looming, quarterback Tommy DeVito was relieved by Clayton Welch. His throw fell a few yards short on a crossing route that could’ve earned the Orange a first down. A later 4th-down-and-goal garnered a similar result. The ball went deep, just not deep enough. Taj Harris caught the ball inside the five-yard line but was tackled before the end zone. Syracuse had fallen short again. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Atletico Sign Gameiro from Sevilla

first_imgAtletico Madrid have signed French forward Kevin Gameiro from fellow La Liga side Sevilla for an undisclosed fee, reported to be about £28m. The 29-year-old has signed a four-year-deal.Gameiro scored 29 goals in all competitions last season, but was not selected in France’s Euro 2016 squad. He joined Sevilla from Paris St-Germain in 2013, helping the Spanish side to three successive Europa League titles.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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