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Former NDP MP Paul Dewar is undergoing treatment for brain cancer

first_imgOTTAWA – A former NDP member of Parliament has announced he is receiving treatment for brain cancer.Paul Dewar, 55, who represented Ottawa Centre from 2006 until 2015, says in a Facebook post that he was diagnosed with a brain tumour earlier this month after experiencing discomfort in his arm.He initially assumed the pain was an injury he sustained while skating on the Rideau Canal in late January, he said. But a hospital visit earlier this month revealed a tumour on the right side of his brain.Dewar says he underwent surgery to remove the tumour on Wednesday, and that he plans to pursue further treatment.“While this cancer is devastating news, I am going to pursue the next phase of my treatment with determination, passion and an appreciation for life,” he wrote.He thanked his family for their support, and says his wife and two sons “have been my greatest source of strength.” He also praised the medical staff involved in his treatment, who he said “are completely dedicated to their patients.”Dewar said that he would encourage anyone who’s asked how they can help him to “consider getting involved in something that will help your neighbourhood.”“Look for the beauty that exists all around us and share it with each other,” he wrote.Several of Dewar’s former colleagues brought up his diagnosis at the NDP’s convention in Ottawa.“It’s so Paul Dewar to suggest helping someone around you,” Montreal-area MP Helene Laverdiere said in French.Charlie Angus, a prominent MP who made a failed bid for NDP leadership last year, was visibly emotional while informing the crowd of Dewar’s cancer.“He has served our party, this city and this nation with such integrity,” Angus said, adding that he was praying for Dewar and his family.Dewar lost his seat to Environment Minister Catherine McKenna in the 2015 election. He is now a board member for Human Rights Watch Canada and Partners in Health Canada. His late mother Marion Dewar served as Ottawa’s mayor from 1978 to 1985.last_img read more

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Firstever Fishermens Pow Wow reels in a sense of community

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt’s been ten years since the Marshall Decision upheld the harvesting rights of Mi’kmaq fishers, sparking years of tension between the Mi’kmaq, government officials, and non-aboriginal fishers.But, as time passes, tensions fade, and the organizers of the inaugural Fisherman’s Pow Wow in Miramachi, New Brunswick, saw an opportunity to create an event where the communities could take a first step towards reconciling.APTN National News reporter Tim Fontaine was at the Pow Wow, and has the story.last_img read more

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Trudeau Horgan under fire for downplaying Aboriginal title following RCMP raid of

first_imgPrime Minister Justin Trudeau was criticized Wednesday in Kamloops for the RCMP’s raid of a check point and camp on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory earlier this week.Justin BrakeAPTN NewsB.C. Premier John Horgan and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau both broke their silence Wednesday on a pipeline company’s injunction against members of the Unist’ot’en House and Gidimt’en Clan, and the RCMP’s raid Monday on unceded Wet’sewet’en territory.But observers say the leaders were misleading, or skirted fundamental questions related to Indigenous jurisdiction and title at the heart of the conflict around the LNG project in northern B.C.On Wednesday Horgan said he has met with and respects hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en Nation, but that the company responsible for the pipeline “has met the obligations that we asked them to achieve.”He also suggested free, prior and informed consent did not mean First Nations could have a veto on resource development projects.Horgan cited a comment he said Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation Chief Bob Chamberlin “categorically and unreservedly” made during recent negotiations between the government and Indigenous leadership over fish farms in B.C., “that the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples does not mean a veto.“It means we need to sit down and find a way forward on consent,” Horgan said.In a written statement Thursday, Chamberlin, who is also vice-president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs (UBCIC), and Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the UBCIC rejected Horgan’s comments.They said there’s an “extremely important distinction” between the situation in Wet’suwet’en territory and the recent announced closure of fish farms in the Broughton Archipelago, where government and First Nations worked together in a “jointly developed consent-based process where our Title and Rights were recognized,” they write.The chiefs say they are “confident that we would not have reached a point of RCMP action at Gidimt’en if a jointly designed, consent-based process had been in place.”Phillip also said they “reject the racist notion of veto perpetuated by industry and government, which falsely implies that Indigenous Peoples demand a unilateral final say on decisions that impact them.“Since colonization, we have had to deal with the Crown having a veto over almost every aspect of our lives, and in the case of the Unist’ot’en, we just watched what their veto over the peacefully protesting Wet’suwet’en land defenders looked like.”Horgan wasn’t the only leader under fire after publicly addressing Monday’s raid of the Gidimt’en Clan’s camp, established a few weeks ago to protect their part of Wet’suwet’en territory.At a town hall event in Kamloops Wednesday evening, Arnie Jack of the Secwepemc Nation pressed Trudeau on the Trans Mountain pipeline and asked the prime minister for evidence the Secwepemc ceded or surrendered their lands to the Crown.“Canada does not have a deed to Shuswap territory, you do not have a deed to Secwepemcul’ecw,” he said, adding Canada does “not have the consent of our Shuswap Nation Elder’s Council to put a pipeline through our territory.”Jack told Trudeau agreements with leadership whose authority was established under Canada’s Indian Act does not equate to consent from the Nation.“You can stand up all of the elected chiefs that you want and say that you have consent, but you do not have consent from the people on the ground,” he said.“What you did to the Unist’ot’en — that’s a national disgrace,” Arnie Jack of the Secwepemc Nation told Trudeau Wednesday in Kamloops. APTN photo.When Jack told Trudeau he “may have bought a few INAC chiefs but you don’t own us all,” the prime minister’s response resembled something he said to a Secwepemc leader last month at an Assembly of First Nations special chiefs’ assembly in Ottawa.On Dec. 5 Neskonlith Indian Band Chief Judy Wilson told Trudeau that on the issue of Trans Mountain Canada does not have the consent of the proper title and rights holders of the Secwepemc Nation, who she said are the collective people and not elected Indian Act chiefs like herself.After hearing Trudeau’s remarks to Jack Wednesday evening, Wilson said she believes the prime minister is “dividing” the people of her Nation, “and being selective” in who his government deals with.“He’s trying to say the Indian Act chiefs and councils have the authority and jurisdiction for the territory, which they don’t,” Wilson told APTN News.“When [bands] sign impacts and benefit agreements or agreements with the government their jurisdiction is only over the one percent of reserve lands,” she said. “Collectively the proper title holders hold the 99 percent of the territory” of the Secwepemc Nation’s 180,000 square kilometres.”Jack told Trudeau Wednesday night in Kamloops he wants the “RCMP out of Unist’ot’en territory.”Thousands of Indigenous people and allies across Canada sent messages of support to Unist’ot’en on Tuesday, many of them also ordering the federal police out of the unceded territory.Peter Grant, a lawyer representing the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, told APTN Thursday that the 1997 Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) Delgamuukw decision acknowledged that the Wet’suwet’en House chiefs “represented their House groups and collectively their Nation.”He said this is where the RCMP got it wrong in a statement they posted to their website before enforcing the injunction, and then later retracted.In an unusual move, the RCMP publicly interpreted Aboriginal case law to justify removing Indigenous people from their lands.They said last Sunday that because the SCC ordered a retrial, and since that retrial has not happened, “Aboriginal title to this land, and which Indigenous nation holds it, has not been determined.”Grant said the RCMP were “right to retract their statement,” adding “it’s not that title doesn’t exist pre-declaration, it’s that the government is refusing to recognize title before a court declaration.“The law is clear,” he said, “Aboriginal title, if it’s there, is there throughout.”In Kamloops, Jack issued a stern warning to Trudeau, saying if the government tries to force the Trans Mountain pipeline through Secwepemc territory his people are “prepared to meet you on the ground this summer anywhere you want,” alluding to the month-long Gustafson Lake standoff in 1995.“We’re serious. We’re not playing around,” he continued. “What you did to the Unist’ot’en — that’s a national disgrace. Jan. 7 was a national disgrace [for] Canada.”jbrake@aptn.ca@JustinBrakeNewslast_img read more

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Power is slowly being restored in Fort St John

first_imgBC Hydro continues to work to restore power with BC Hydro crews on scene, there is no estimated time of restoration of service, shared Gammer.To stay up to date with the progress of restoration Gammer directs customers to visit the BC Hydro website under ‘Power Outage’ then continue to either the ‘View List’ by clicking; HERE. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Since 6 am there have been multiple power outages in Fort St. John and surrounding areas.As of 12:47 pm, there are now 15 outages from the 22 that were listed at 9:57 am. Customers that are currently affected are now at 530 down from 8600 customers a couple of hours ago, shared Bob, Gammer, Community Relations for BC Hydro.last_img read more

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UNbacked Global Fund awards almost 3 billion to fight killer diseases

These latest grants bring the Global Fund’s overall commitment to combating the three diseases to more than $14 billion and will finance projects over the next two years to low-income countries around the world.“This is the highest amount of new financing approved by the Global Fund ever,” said Rajat Gupta, Chair of the Global Fund Board, which met in New Delhi, India, over the weekend to make decisions over the allocation of the money. “These new resources will significantly help the world in achieving global targets such as universal access to AIDS treatment and prevention, and cutting the number of deaths from tuberculosis and malaria by half by 2015,” added Mr. Gupta.Programmes combating malaria will receive just over half of the funding, and AIDS and TB initiatives will get 38 per cent and 11 per cent respectively.Africa and the Middle East will see the vast majority of the grants awarded, with 77 per cent of the total. Asia and the Western Pacific will receive 14 per cent, Latin America and the Caribbean 6 per cent and Eastern Europe and Central Asia another 6 per cent.“We have a fantastic message to bring back to the rich nations of the world: programmes to fight these three diseases save lives, reduce disease burdens, and strengthen health systems,” said the Executive Director of the Global Fund, Michel Kazatchkine.Programmes backed by the Fund are estimated to have already provided AIDS treatment to 1.75 million patients and TB treatment for 3.9 million people. They have also distributed 59 million insecticide-treated bed nets to prevent malaria. 10 November 2008The United Nations-backed Global Fund announced today that it has approved 94 new grants worth $2.75 billion to projects aimed at fighting HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. read more

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UN drug official praises work of Central Asian antitrafficking body

Speaking at the Central Asian Regional Information and Coordination Centre (CARICC) in Kazakhstan during a regional tour, the Executive Director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Yury Fedotov, praised the Centre’s work and called for it to take on an expanded role.The Centre, which opened last year, helps to coordinate law enforcement operations against the trafficking in chemicals used in the illegal manufacture of heroin, sharing and analyzing intelligence and information with regional and international organizations such as Interpol, Europol and the World Customs Organisation.Mr. Fedotov said he hoped CARICC would coordinate its intelligence operations closely with regional organizations such as UNODC’s newly-launched Regional Programme for Afghanistan and Neighbouring Countries.“This Programme will serve as a platform for the countries of the region and the international community to work together to develop and implement effective, integrated strategies to counter organized crime and drug trafficking,” he said.“UNODC would like to help CARICC play a more active role in the intelligence-led approach to tackling drug trafficking,” he added. Mr. Fedotov praised the results achieved since the Centre opened, including the disruption of more than 20 trafficking channels, resulting in the seizure of more than 200 kilogrammes of heroin and over 100 kilogrammes of opium. The Executive Director’s visit to CARICC is part of his larger trip to Central and West Asia. He also visited the United Arab Emirates, where UNODC will open a sub-regional office early in 2011. Mr. Fedotov spoke of an expanding relationship between UNODC and the UAE and spoke of the country’s important role in the fight against drug trafficking.“As a critical area in the region, the United Arab Emirates is positioned both geographically and economically to make a tangible difference in fighting crimes such as in the trafficking of drugs and humans,” he said. 29 November 2010The United Nations can work more closely with regional organizations in the fight against drug trafficking, a senior official with the world body said today as he commended the efforts carried out in Central Asia. read more

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Toronto housing market downturn to be shortlived federal housing agency says

TORONTO — The recent downturn in Toronto’s real estate market, brought on after Ontario introduced measures this spring including a foreign buyers’ tax, is expected to be brief, the federal housing agency said Wednesday.Property prices in the city — which fell from an average of $919,589 in April to $793,915 last month, according to data from the Toronto Real Estate Board — should pick up again due to supply constraints and a stronger economy, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. said.“The response we’re seeing in the Toronto market seems almost emotional and a knee-jerk reaction to some of the changes, which suggests that these impacts will be short-lived,” Dana Senagama, CMHC’s principal market analyst for Toronto, said during a conference call to discuss the agency’s latest housing market assessment.The provincial government’s measures, which were retroactive to April 21, include a 15 per cent tax on foreign buyers in the Greater Golden Horseshoe region, expanded rent controls and legislation allowing Toronto and other cities to tax vacant homes.“If job creation continues in Toronto … and the economy continues to fuel the housing demand, we can expect some of the pressures on house prices in Toronto to resume,” said Bob Dugan, CMHC’s chief economist.Like Toronto, Vancouver also experienced a real estate slowdown following the implementation of a tax on foreign buyers a year ago. But there have been signs this year that the city’s housing market is heating up again.In its latest quarterly house price survey released two weeks ago, Royal LePage said home sales in Vancouver began to recover in the April-to-June period after the tax “bruised consumer confidence.” The realtor reported in April that sales in Vancouver’s housing market jumped by almost 50 per cent on a month-over-month basis.CMHC, in its latest housing market assessment released Wednesday, kept its overall risk rating for the national housing market at strong. The quarterly report, which is based on data from the first three months of this year, precedes the Ontario government housing rules.Follow @DaveHTO on Twitter. read more

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Bengalurubased NGO supplies rare blood to Sri Lanka

However, the NGO provides this service free of cost. “While we pay for the flight cargo charges for poor families, the recipient takes care of shipping charges if he is well-off,” said Ankita. “The moment we find a donor or a recipient, we counsel the family to get screened for Bombay blood group because only they can help each other in times of emergency,” she said.When someone’s blood group is A, it means that the person has antigen of type ‘A’ and antibody of type ‘B’ in their blood. People with AB have both antigen A and B in their blood and no antibodies.People with O blood group have only antibodies A and B and no antigens.  However, what is not generally known is that all these groups have an antigen H in their blood as well. There are very few people – those with Bombay group – who don’t have antigen H in their blood. Instead, they have antibody H because of which no other blood can be given to them. A Bengaluru-based NGO, Sankalp India Foundation, is supplying blood Sri Lanka.The blood is for patients with HH blood group otherwise known as Bombay blood group, which is extremely rare. Only one in 10,000 or 0.0001 per cent patients have this blood group according to various studies. “In all of Sri Lanka, they couldn’t find a single donor with HH negative group blood type. The family approached Sankalp. We sent blood to her twice, once in December 2016 and the second time in April this year. Bombay negative is rarer than Bombay positive. Known donors with Bombay negative across India are merely 15 in number,” said Kumari Ankita, senior volunteer, Sankalp India Foundation. Surprisingly, Karnataka has the largest number of donors registered with Sankalp at 80, out of which 45 are from Bengaluru. “We have sent blood units to Turkey and twice to Sri Lanka. We have assisted families in USA and Pakistan to get blood locally,” she said.Since 2010, Sankalp has facilitated 451 blood transfusions for those with this blood group. It has 230 donors registered across the country. No state government or blood bank in the country India has made the concerted effort of maintaining a registry of rare blood group donors. In April this year, a 70-year-old Sri Lankan woman suffering from cancer needed Bombay negative blood. read more

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Senior UN official urges donors to include Iraqi women in reconstruction efforts

“The capacity and skills of women in Iraq are considerable and we rely on those driving the humanitarian efforts in the country to ensure women are fully involved and able to influence the process,” said Joanne Sandler, Deputy Executive Director for Programme at the UN Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM).Ms. Sandler – speaking during a UNIFEM-sponsored panel discussion on the role of women in post-conflict Iraq held at UN Headquarters in New York – said it was important for women to have a say across all the sectors covered by the pledging conference in October agreed upon earlier this week by 52 countries as well as UN agencies and representatives of the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA), the US-run interim administration in Baghdad. UNIFEM Executive Director Noeleen Heyzer said the change of regime in Iraq presents an “opportunity for broader participation by women.” She said although Iraqi women have a long history of social mobilization, it was rather “static and hierarchical” under the old government.Nasreen Mustafa Sideek, Minister of Reconstruction and Development of the Iraqi Kurdistan Regional Government and Hattie Babbitt, Senior Vice President of Women Waging Peace, were also part of the panel. read more

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Middle East Annan says recent elections show yearning for effective government

In New York, Mr. Annan was asked by reporters about the success of Hamas in the Palestinian elections, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, and religious parties in Iraq. “I am not sure if the region is saying goodbye to secular government, or if the religious are better organized, and have acquired a reputation of being able to deliver,” he replied. “If that is the case, it is a message for ruling regimes, and for other parties, that this is what people are looking for.”The Secretary-General said the trend was not a total rejection of secular movements or a swing to Islamic parties. “I think, if the regimes in power were seen to be delivering, were seen to be close to the people, I am sure the results would have been quite different,” he said.Winning religious parties, such as Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, have all been well organized, he said. “What were the people voting for? Were they voting for a clean government? Were they voting for peace? Were they voting for a stable environment in which their kids could go to school? Or were they voting for a Hamas manifesto? My sense is that they were voting for a peaceful and stable and well-organized Palestine.”The Secretary-General observed that this trend should serve as a “a lesson and a message for all rulers and politicians in the region, and everywhere in the world, that people want good government, and they will vote for people that they believe would offer that.”Asked specifically about Hamas, he said it was important to remember that it had never been in government and that they needed time to prepare to govern. He also called on the group to listen to appeals from the Quartet on the Middle East – the UN, the Russian Federation, the European Union and the United States – as well as from other countries.“My message to the Palestinian people who voted and voted peacefully, in a calm and secure manner, is to pursue the effort that they have been engaged in with the Quartet in trying to implement the Road Map,” the Secretary-General said, referring to a peace plan aimed at settling the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.“I urge Hamas to listen to the appeals, not just from the Quartet, but from other governments in the region, asking it to transform itself into a political party. We must also understand that this is not the first time that an armed movement has transformed itself into a political party,” he said. read more

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