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Family left with over $3,000 bill after coming back to flooded house

first_imgA GoFundMe campaign has been started to help a Charlie Lake family afford fixing their home after coming home to it not only being broken into, but flooded.Robin Westergaard and her family went away to Edmonton for a medical trip, and a friend house-sitting checked on the residence and told them their water pipe was pouring into the rest of the house.An estimate from Windsor Plywood says the damage would cost $3,267.09 to fix.- Advertisement -Fort St. John RCMP says this happened during the night of October 8th, and the person who broke in did not seem to steal anything – only unattached a water pipe in the bathroom that caused the home to flood.Cpl. Jodi Shelkie said there was nothing at the scene to help find evidence or identify a suspect, and asks the public to call RCMP or Crimestoppers if they have any more information.The campaign can be found here.Advertisementlast_img read more

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ROSSES ATHLETE PAT SHOWS AGE IS NO BARRIER AS HE WINS GOLD AT 81!!

first_img81 year-old Pat Ward from Keadue, proved age is no barrier as he captured Gold in the 200m and Silver in the 100m in the M10 category at the Masters Track and Field Championships in Tullamore earlier today.Pat, proudly wearing his Rosses AC vest is pictured with his brother Tony in the picture above.Well done Pat on your fantastic achievement, and for proving that age really is just a number. ROSSES ATHLETE PAT SHOWS AGE IS NO BARRIER AS HE WINS GOLD AT 81!! was last modified: August 10th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:81 years oldgold medalnewsPat WardROSSES ACSportTULLAMORElast_img read more

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Failing the children

first_imgFederal and local officials failed hundreds of working families Monday when their ineptitude caused a gap in the Head Start preschool programs serving the San Fernando and Santa Clarita valleys. Many of the 1,435 children enrolled in the 26 affected Head Start programs come from low-income families who rely on the free child care in order to work. But these families had no idea the programs were going to be shut down Monday until the doors were locked. Undoubtedly, many parents lost work – and a day’s pay – due to the unexpected closure. And no doubt it will hurt. This was not supposed to happen. The transition to a new provider was supposed to occur without a hitch. But clearly the bad feelings between the federal Administration for Children, Youth and Families, which oversees the Head Start programs nationwide, and local preschool officials influenced the outcome. The problems with the preschool provider, the Latin American Civic Association, have been going on for a long time. It was no surprise that the federal officials were planning to end LACA’s contract and move it to another provider temporarily. But the feds promised the community that there would be no interruption in critical services. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Federal officials shouldn’t have closed down the programs until LACA had turned over the paperwork to allow an interim provider to take over the preschools’ operation. But LACA messed up too. The local organization supposedly has a strong commitment to the members of its community. Surely that connection to the community should have resulted in an effort to avoid this situation, or at least calling parents to give them some advance warning. This was a spat, pure and simple, between two agencies. And like most senseless battles, it is the innocents who suffered. Both federal and LACA officials ought to be ashamed of the way this turned out. Los Angeles city officials pay a lot of lip service to their concerns about the well-being of working families, but provided no leadership before or after this fiasco. These kind of betrayals of public trust have seriously undermined confidence in government at the local, state and national levels. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Bacho’s homer lifts Crabs past Kings

first_imgDawson Bacho hit a 2-run home run to put the Humboldt Crabs ahead for good in what was a 5-4 win over the visiting West Coast Kings, Friday night at the Arcata Ball Park.Bacho gave the Crabs the lead for good in the bottom of the fifth inning. Bacho did his best Kyle Knell impression from Wednesday’s win over the Redding Ringtails and sent a home run over the left field wall and onto the 101 — which at this point should have some sort of signage warning drivers of a Crabs lineup prone to …last_img read more

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More Soft Tissue Found in Old Fossils

first_imgA reptile skin fossilized in rock said to be 50 million years old has been found.  According to Science Daily, scientists at the University of Manchester reported the discovery of amide molecules in “fossilized soft tissue of a beautifully-preserved reptile.”  The original paper, accessible to the public, was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.1     According to Roy Wogelius, a geochemist who used infrared analysis on the fossil, “The mapped distributions of organic compounds and trace metals in 50 million year old skin look so much like maps we’ve made of modern lizard skin as a check on our work, it is sometimes hard to tell which is the fossil and which is fresh.”    The use of infrared and X-ray technologies opens up new avenues for non-destructive exploration of fossilized material.  The article did not explain how the organic molecules could last for millions of years except to state that they are using “modern analytical chemistry and 21st century techniques to understand how such remarkable preservation occurs….”    With their writeup, the BBC News presented pictures of the fossil and infrared data.  As for how the soft tissue survived, the BBC offered this explanation: “The details from the study suggest that when skin’s organic compounds began to break down, they formed a chemical bond with trace metals that, under certain circumstances, then go on to build a ‘bridge’ with the surrounding minerals.  A result of this process meant that the skin and remaining soft tissue was protected from further decomposition or further erosion” – but for 50 million years?  The reporter did not elaborate on how rarely this bridging occurs, or why it closely resembles modern gecko skin using the same analysis techniques.  According to the story, Wogelius and his team tried to analyze fossilized dinosaur skin said to be 67 million years old (12/03/2007), but were unable to map any biological structure – not because the soft tissue was absent, but because it tended to fall apart too easily.  The paper referenced the work by Mary Schweitzer on dinosaur soft tissue (01/30/2011, 04/30/2009).    In a related article, Science Daily said, “A University of Alberta-led research team has discovered that insects that bore into trees as long ago as 90 million years, or as recently as last summer, leave a calling card that’s rich with information.”  The article mentioned samples of amber said to be 90 million and 17 million years old without any indication that there has been any evolutionary change over that expanse of time – a period in which evolutionists claim all the major mammals, including whales, evolved.  Instead, the press release simply ended, “This discovery will help researchers understand the history of insect infestations.”1.  Edwards…Wogelius et al, “Infrared mapping resolves soft tissue preservation in 50 million year-old reptile skin,” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, published online before print March 23, 2011, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2011.0135 (open access).Watch out for the suggestive wording in articles like this.  The first article used the phrase “building blocks” twice.  That phrase is commonly used by evolutionists seeking to make the origin of life sound as easy as A-B-C.  The end of the article also talked about using the techniques to infer the long-term status of buried wastes, a red herring that sidesteps the damaging implications of finding still-intact soft tissue in rock alleged to be millions of years old.    Over and over, articles like these promise readers that discoveries are helping scientists “understand” the world.  If they truly understood, they would admit that the evidence only makes sense if these fossils are recent.  The millions of years are not in the fossils in the rocks, remember, but in the rocks in evolutionists’ heads.(Visited 21 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Media tour boosts China-Africa link

first_imgOlive Hou, currently visiting South Africa, is the international relations manager for China Entrepreneur magazine. (Image: Ray Maota) China Entrepreneur reporter Susan Qin chats to George Lo of Standard Chartered Bank at a business dinner in Sandton. Michael Duncan of Alexander Forbes speaks to Olive Hou during the business dinner. (Images: Nicky Rehbock) MEDIA CONTACTS • Brand South Africa +27 11 483 0122RELATED ARTICLES • South Africa-China trade ties to strengthen • China injects R1.7bn into Malawi • Trade fair to boost SADC-China ties • Telkom secures R902m loan • China deal: a new day for AfricaNicky Rehbock and Ray MaotaA group of Chinese business journalists are currently touring Africa to investigate investment opportunities, share lessons from existing Chinese businesses on the continent and strengthen the sense of mutual understanding between African and Asian cultures.Brand South Africa is hosting the group during its final leg of the tour, following visits to Ethiopia, Chad, Algeria, Zambia and Kenya.The China Entrepreneur reporters’ findings will be published in their magazine’s African Focus issue at the end of November 2011.The fortnightly publication boasts a circulation figure of 150 000 and is the Chinese equivalent of Fortune – according to Olive Hou, the magazine’s international relations manager.“South Africa is the last stop on our tour to see what strategies these countries have in place to foster trade with China and if there are investment opportunities for China’s entrepreneurs in those countries,” Hou said.Today China is South Africa’s biggest trading partner, with the total value of trade between the two nations nearing US$16-billion (R125-billion) in 2010.Tshepo Nkosi, Brand South Africa’s communications manager, said: “We have structured the tour so that the group will have the opportunity to get acquainted with the different industries in South Africa and the opportunities that exist within those sectors.“After this tour, the group will have been shown how our trade and investment policy acts as an enabler to foreign investment.”And with South Africa’s recent inclusion in the BRIC economic bloc of Brazil, Russia, India and China, the tour comes at an opportune time.“So far we have observed a diversity of Chinese business interests in Africa, including construction projects in Kenya and Algeria, mining along Zambia’s copper belt and telecoms in South Africa – to name a few. Either directly or indirectly these are a boost to local economies,” Hou said.The range of Chinese investments in Kenya was particularly interesting for the team.“There we discovered a plastics-manufacturing firm, and vegetable and poultry concerns run by Chinese. We even discovered a Chinese-owned digital satellite pay-TV group which, in addition to Kenya, operates in Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi.”Hou says the tour has helped develop a sense of respect for Chinese working culture.“We want there to be a better understanding of China’s position in Africa and this can be brought about by healthy media coverage. Sometimes there is negative publicity because people aren’t seeing the bigger picture.”Hou adds that the tour will help the Chinese journalists put together a balanced report on African trade opportunities.“We want our Africa report to be neutral and to cover all experiences and challenges we’ve found in Africa. We don’t want to create propaganda. The report needs to be constructive and show the experiences of people who are having success working cross-culturally.“There must also be advice on how to overcome challenges such as the language barrier and difficulties with local legal systems. China has vast experience in industrial development, which it can bring to Africa.”Policies beneficial to Chinese investmentThe journalists visited the National Empowerment Fund (NEF) in Sandton, Johannesburg, to learn more about local policies which can help boost Chinese investment.The NEF was established in 1998 as a way to promote and facilitate black economic participation in the newly democratic South Africa.Some years later South Africans of Chinese descent were given full benefits in terms of the country’s employment equity and Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) policies to correct exclusions during apartheid rule.This means that South African Chinese are now eligible to be empowered under BBBEE, which the NEF supports.This empowerment strategy could be seen as advantageous to China-based investors who have ties with South Africans of Chinese descent.Zwelibanzi Sapula, head of strategic funds at the NEF, said: “Although we do not necessarily go out and look for Chinese investment, we have appointed a financial service provider which shows potential foreign investors all our projects and how they could benefit from being involved.”Sapula added that there are three ways foreign investors can become involved in a project: at a funding level, project level or both.At the funding level, the investor will only make monetary contributions, while at project level the investor will play a more active role in the investment, such as bringing in the technology needed to make the project successful.Sapula cited an NEF-backed project, which involves using Chinese technology to convert discarded tyres into consumable oils. According to the NEF, Chinese involvement at both funding and project levels could have helped speed up implementation as there was a lack of interest from financiers.Entrepreneurial lessons from SasolDuring their time in Johannesburg the journalists also visited fuel manufacturer Sasol’s headquarters in the suburb of Rosebank, where they were shown how innovative business models can boost entrepreneurship.One of the examples is the ChemCity initiative, which aims to make it easier for small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) to become established in the chemical, energy and related industries.Phase one of the ChemCity Eco-Industrial Park in Sasolburg offers entrepreneurs a space to construct environment-friendly premises with 24-hour security and exemption from paying rates and taxes until 31 December 2018. It also offers competitive rates for the renting or selling of sites.Since July 2004 the ChemCity initiative has helped establish 262 SMMEs and create 3 000 jobs.Hou said: “I see how the South African chemical energy sector is thriving and there are many viable opportunities for Chinese investors in this sector.”last_img read more

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Successful planting season for many in 2015

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In travel destinations and conversations around the state during the spring planting season, the OCJ and Ohio Ag Net staff members get a fairly broad vantage point of the ups and downs of corn and soybean planting progress. When combined with the official crop progress numbers, it reveals a good general picture of the planting season.According to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service for the week ending May 31, Ohio’s corn was 93% planted, which was 8% ahead of last year and 12% ahead of the five-year average. Soybeans in Ohio were 85% planted compared to the 64% five year average and 61% last year. Prior to that, big planting progress took place the week ending May 13 with 40% of the state’s corn crop and 19% of the soybean going into the ground, according to USDA.Along with the numerical data, here are some of the updates through the 2015 planting season from different farmers around Ohio. April 28It was the second day of planting for MKB Farms in Crawford County. Ty Higgins rode with Nick Kocher for a Cab Cam video and Kocher had this to say.“It is drier than we thought it would be and it is going well so far. The weeds were tough coming out of winter. The wheat stubble going to beans this year had some real issues. We had some volunteer wheat coming up this spring,” he said. “We have gone with the wives tale of when the pin oak leaves are the size of squirrel ears — and they are there. We are starting to see some leaves out on trees and that is Mother Nature’s way of telling us we should be running.” May 2Nate Douritas at the Farm Science Review in Madison County was rolling right along with a new John Deere planting at 10 miles per hour and was pleased at the planting progress at that point.“We are finding really good conditions. This is our fourth day of planting,” he said. “We have been in a nice little window here to plant. We have been drying out and we are getting nice soil and temperatures for planting corn and soybeans.” May 5Joel Penhorwood got to ride in the cab with Doug Henry of Logan County, who was glad to finally see some sunshine.“It is nice to have some warm temperatures. That is what we are looking for. The ground has warmed up just the way we like it. We started last week and we have about 500 acres planted. We are not working very hard at it yet — the ground is still a little heavy. We have been waiting until the afternoon to start,” Henry said. “We have a row of peony bushes at our house. Just about always the first peonies will be blooming when we start planting and they are not yet. I expect that to be in the next day or two, but we are a little ahead of planting as far as our normal ground temperatures.“We have some ground in Champaign County that has some gravel under it and it has dried out a lot faster. Planting has progressed pretty well there. As you go north, the ground is a little heavier and things are just getting started. There are probably not many acres planted yet to the north of us.” May 7Josh Yoder of Logan County was moving right along and was glad for a little rain after things got a bit too dry on the farm.“We got some rain and it was a life saver for us,” Yoder said. “The first corn I got planted was last week and it should be up by the weekend or the first part of next week.” May 11John Wilson’s planting season was nearing its conclusion as he rolled through the field working some corn stalk ground for soybeans in a Franklin County field on the outskirts of Columbus.“We started April 17 and that corn is up with four leaves and looking good. We’re down to about 500 acres of beans and we’ll be wrapped up in a couple of days,” he said. “We’re going to hope for big yields because the price isn’t there. Some of this stuff is at breakeven prices right now.” May 11In his May 11 Between the Rows report, Andy Rodefer of Preble County painted a very different picture from much of the state.“We have made some progress, but it has still been pretty challenging in this area. We started planting on May 2 and planted until May 4. Then we ended up getting about 1.5 inches of rain on May 4 and it pounded stuff into the ground — something we definitely did not need. We were out last week until Friday and we were able to plant beans. Then we planted corn on Saturday and Sunday. We got another .7 last night.“Most people have gotten started around here but there are still some farmers who haven’t started planting yet. If you go north two miles and south 10 miles they have been missing the rains. We have been getting hit here pretty steady and field conditions have really not been ideal for planting, but the corn that we planted first is all up and it does look pretty good.” May 14After a slow start to the season, Chris Lutmer in Warren County was pleased to share with Ty Higgins that plenty of progress had finally been made.“I think we’re getting along pretty good now. There for a while we were behind. Once it finally dried out in the last week and a half we got a bunch done. Most of the corn is done around here and guys are finally getting along really well with beans, and we kind of need a rain around here,” he said. “It is planting really nice. We have some wetter farms and they are finally drying out. It worked down nice and we got things cleaned up. We are really happy with the way it is going in.” May 26For week one of the AgriGold Feeding Farmers in the Fields program, Dale Minyo and company stopped in with lunch at Maple View Farms in Erie County. The farm is run by Keith Edwards and two of his sons Kirk and Kent.As far as their spring, Keith said planting had gone very well compared to other years.“We’ve had actually what we’d call a normal spring, which we haven’t had in many years,” Keith said. “It’s been a good spring. We are sidedressing. Spraying — we’ve got a little moratorium on that — we’re in between spraying time. And hay, as soon as we get a weather window we’re ready to cut hay, but we’re dry right now.” In general, Ohio corn and soybean growers had fairly cooperative conditions, especially compared to the very challenging planting season in 2014. The slow start this spring had many fearing the worst, but a sudden warm up, followed by a cool wet period for most of the state, led to a successful planting season for many.There were, however, some notable exceptions with conditions that were too cold, too wet or too dry. Ohio State University corn specialist Peter Thomison has heard of a broad range of problems showing up in Ohio corn fields this spring in localized areas.“Some of the usual culprits are causing corn problems. The cold weather contributed to cork screw corn emergence and some marginal looking corn plants due to limited nitrogen uptake in the cold weather. I have heard about some compaction issues where maybe some growers got on too early and there were areas of the field where the corn just wasn’t coming up well. We encountered the same problem where the conditions looked very nice on top but maybe two inches below the soil surface it was wet and gummy in some of the Hoytville clays and other heavy soils. It planted nicely but not too far down it was still wet and got compacted in some areas,” Thomison said. “In contrast, some corn germinated in dry seed beds and there was no moisture. The roots got dehydrated and desiccated and they are gone. They are not going to do anything now.”There were also problems with persistent rainfall in some places.“There were also some logistical issues with too much rain in some areas where it was hard to get herbicide application or nitrogen application done in a timely way,” Thomison said. “So much got planted in one week this year that we ended up being a lot earlier than last year. Overall I think that was a good thing, though some of the people may have been pushing it a bit with some of those acres. I don’t think planting that much in a week is an issue. Given the GDDs for emergence, the differences between emergence from late April and mid May are only just a few days anyway.”While good soybean stands are also common around Ohio, a few growers are seeing damping-off and uneven emergence, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension.“If soybean emergence is uneven, growers should determine the cause before making decisions on whether they need to replant,” Lindsey said. “Most reports I’ve heard from growers are that things are looking good right now, with a few reports from some growers of uneven soybean emergence because of dry soil.“To determine the cause of uneven emergence, growers can dig up seed in an area of the field that has no plants emerged to see if the germinated seed is healthy and free of disease or insect damage. If the seed is healthy and germinated but just not broken through the soil, growers don’t need to worry because a little bit of rainfall will help it to continue to emerge.”Now the focus will turn to the early growing season that is predicted to be slightly warmer and wetter than normal for Ohio, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Stayed tuned for up-to-the-minute crop progress updates throughout the season at ocj.com.last_img read more

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Justice eludes man whose son’s death sparked protests

first_imgThe State Human Rights Commission (SHRC) has dismissed the application moved by Ashraf Mattoo, whose son Tufail Mattoo died in a widely-reported police firing in Srinagar in 2010, where he sought a copy of the Koul commission.‘Application dismissed’SHRC chairman Justice Bilal Nazki, in response to the application move by Mr. Mattoo, said, “This request is outside the jurisdiction of this commission (SHRC). The application is dismissed.”Mr Mattoo’s 17-year-old son died in police firing on June 11 in 2010, sparking a five-month-long cycle of violence.On June 19, 2014, the government appointed a one-man judicial commission headed by Justice M.L Koul to probe the 2010 killing.Quoting Mr. Nazki’s recent statement where he asked people “to approach the Commission even in case a patwari refuses to issue any revenue paper,” Mr. Mattoo said “Mr. Nazki saw human rights violation in case a patwari refuses a document. But what is holding back the SHRC from issuing a direction to seek a copy of report of the Commission. It is my rightful plea to have the copy of the Commission report before which I deposed and cooperation with the hope to get justice.”Mr. Mattoo said the State and its institutions seem “out to kill the idea of justice by such acts.”Earlier in January, the Commission refused to share its findings with Mr. Mattoo. The officials at the tribunal in Srinagar denied him access to the retired report, in which 60 civilian killings were re-investigated.“I filed an application for the report in the first week of January. I am told that I will get access only to a small portion of the report. Isn’t it my right to get a copy of the report of which I have been a part since its formation in 2014,” Mr. Mattoo said.last_img read more

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No split yet, but Naveen’s BJD a party divided

first_imgAlthough a split in the Biju Janata Dal’s Parliamentary Party has been averted for the time being following a series of tweets by BJD’s chief whip in the Lok Sabha, Tathagata Satpathy, the BJP does not seem to have given up hopes as yet.According to sources in the saffron party, at least two BJD Lok Sabha members are working towards engineering a split in their Parliamentary party at the instance of national-level BJP leaders. “While BJD MP Baijayant Panda has been furthering the BJP’s cause through his writings and tweets, another junior MP is working behind the curtains,” said a BJP member in Odisha, who wished not to be named.BJP plans meet“Anything could happen in the BJD Parliamentary Party after the BJP’s forthcoming national executive meeting in Bhubaneswar,” the member added.The meet, which will be organised from April 15-16, will be attended by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and BJP national president Amit Shah, besides Union Ministers and Chief Ministers of all BJP-ruled States.Union Petroleum Minister Dharmendra Pradhan, who is being projected as the BJP’s new face in Odisha, had said on Sunday that the party’s strategy for the simultaneous Lok Sabha and Assembly elections in the State in 2019 would be discussed at the event.Mr. Satpathy had tweeted last week that the saffron party was working towards causing a rebellion, if not a split, against the Naveen Patnaik government ahead of the polls. If that happens, Mr. Patnaik might face a rebellion in the Assembly, leading to imposition of the President’s rule in the State.Although the BJP never enjoyed a strong presence at the grassroots level, it struck gold when it replaced the Congress, the BJD’s traditional rival, in the three-tier panchayat elections in February. The BJP is also using the alleged infighting within the Odisha unit of the Congress to its advantage.At the bicentenary celebrations of the Paika mutiny that the BJP is planning to organise later this year, some prominent Congress leaders are likely to join the party, said sources.See also Page 8last_img read more

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