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Navesink Arts Center Housed in Former Library Site

first_imgBy John BurtonMIDDLETOWN – Paul and Lori Renick have been working hard to make sure the building that was home to the public library branch – and continues to be for the Monmouth Players – gets a second act.“Our goal is to see this as a performing arts/visual arts center,” said Paul Renick of the former Navesink branch library at 149 Monmouth Ave.Since March, when the township’s library system closed all three of its branches, the Renicks have been working with the not-for-profit foundation that owns and maintains the structure to establish the Navesink Arts Center.Paul and Lori Renick beneath the recently cleaned portrait of Herman Duryea. It was Duryea’s foundation that built the Navesink building where the couple is establishing the Navesink Arts Center. The Highlands couple, who operate a carpentry business and have been long active with the Monmouth Players community theater group, have been working and overseeing the work at the site. The work includes new carpets – the first since 1989; a new paint job, the first in more than 20 years; refurbishing the existing tin ceiling; and general cleanup work to get the building in shape for the Monmouth Players community theater troupe’s season. That’s all happening as they move forward with plans to formally establish the arts center.The site is now hosting the Monmouth Players production of Neil Simon’s Brighton Beach Memoirs (running Oct. 18-20 and 26-27 and Nov. 2). It’s the first of four shows the company is producing this season. The Navesink Arts Center will also feature performances by local singer/songwriters on Nov. 16; and an art exhibit/sale being presented by the Beauregard Fine Art gallery, Rumson.In the future, the Renicks and the arts center will be working with the Navesink School, the K-3 grade school next door, and its parent-teacher organization to establish an art program for the students.“I don’t want just arts and crafts,” Lori Renick said. “I want real art classes … There are some real talented kids out there.”She hopes the arts center will be able to nurture that talent.The building was completed by the Duryea Foundation in 1917 in memory of its founder, Herman B. Duryea, a sportsman and thoroughbred racehorse breeder. The foundation operated the site as a cultural and community center that had a lending library – the first in Middle­town and one of the first in the state – and had tennis courts which still exist, plus a gymnasium and auditorium and even a bowling alley in its lower level, according to Michael Winchell, president of the board of directors for the Duryea-Navesink Library Association.The Duryea Foundation merged with the Navesink Library Association in 1994, establishing the new 501(c) 3, not-for-profit organization.The purpose of the foundation and its building was to be available for “social, literary, artistic and educational activities,” Winchell said.The foundation allowed the township to operate the branch library at the building, starting in 1959 with the township paying $1 a year until closing the branch in March. The township’s parks and recreation department also used the site’s tennis courts until about 10 years ago, Winchell said.Lori and Paul Renick have been involved with the Mon­mouth Players since 1993, with Paul serving as its president since 1997. The group has been putting on productions for 60 years, initially at Rumson’s Bingham Hall, then Red Bank Catholic High School and the Leonardo grammar school, before settling in at the Duryea house 57 years ago, Paul Renick said.Neither of the Renicks had a background – or even an interest – in theater when asked if they would like to help the Monmouth Players mount a production. They started by assisting with set building, then did some acting and now Paul directs some shows. “I’m a frustrated artist,” he said. “It’s my way to paint a picture.”Other than an endowment that is used for the building’s upkeep, the Monmouth Players is the only way the site generates revenue at this time – at least until a fuller slate of programs can be developed, Winchell said. The Duryea-Navesink Library Association and theater group are now discussing a merger to establish the long-term financial health of the site, he said.On the financial front, Paul Renick said he hasn’t and doesn’t plan to seek any government assistance for what he and his wife hope to do, believing the arts center can be self-sustaining. “I don’t want to be encumbered by their rules or politics,” he stressed.The site will eventually be available to the public with the former library space being dedicated as a community reading room with books available and a children’s area that will host storytime and other programs. The area also could be used as an alternative performance space that will hopefully generate some additional revenue, Lori Renick said.Further plans look toward removing the two rear tennis courts and developing a community art garden, consisting of sculptures and a winding path leading to a tranquil garden area, Lori Renick said. Those plans, however, are “crazy ambitious,” and will have to wait for a couple of years, she conceded.For now the work at the Navesink Arts Center is about continuing with the cleaning and hosting the show, they said.last_img read more

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Dr. Steven Landers: VNA Teamwork Leader

first_imgBy Gretchen Van BenthuysenWhile growing up in the Shaker Heights suburb of Cleveland, Ohio, Steve Landers’ family often could be found sitting around its kitchen table talking about what was going on in American health care.Perhaps not the most scintillating kind of conversation for a young man, but given that his father was a dentist and teacher at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and his mother was a hospital administrator with a master’s degree in business administration, it was inevitable.“I was influenced deeply by my parents. I looked up to them and found their work very interesting and worthwhile,” Landers said. “Over the years I learned a lot about the mindsets, the practicality and the sensibilities of somebody who is on the frontlines of taking care of people every day and at the same time the realities of the business of health care. I got a great perspective.”He vividly remembers them talking about the introduction of diagnostic-related grouping, a way for Medicare and health insurance companies to categorize hospital costs and determine how much to pay for a patient’s hospital stay.“You can imagine how that changed the business of hospital care,” he said with a grin during in an interview in the meeting room next to his unassuming office that features a small family photo of his three young sons and wife, a senior vice president at Prudential in Newark. “The length of stays at the hospital became a lot shorter. It actually created the part of health care I now work in — aftercare.”At 41, Landers, now living in Little Silver and loving it, is president and CEO of the Visiting Nurse Association Health Group, the nation’s second largest not-for-profit home health care organization, which serves 12 counties in New Jersey. Founded in 1912, its headquarters is at 176 Riverside Ave. in Red Bank.Last month, the VNA launched its 2020 Vision Campaign, a groundbreaking initiative to provide new, innovative and enhanced care for people in their homes and communities.Landers is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He is a member of several boards, writes numerous articles for medical journals and contributes to the Huffington Post.Previously, he was the director of the Center for Home Care and Community Rehabilitation and director of Post-Acute Operations for the Cleveland Clinic, rated the second best hospital in the United States by U.S. News and World Report.On his medical journey he became a certified family doctor and geriatrician with a special interest in geriatric medicine, home health, hospice and palliative care. What he is perhaps most passionate about is teamwork and house calls.After four years of college, four years of medical school, one year of public health school and three years of residency, Landers was asked to join the Cleveland Clinic and started a home visiting program for doctors in a high poverty neighborhood.“If you go back to the 1940s, most encounters people had with physicians in this country were in their homes,” he explained. “For a lot of reasons, that changed.”His program exploded and the clinic was overwhelmed with referrals.“I fell in love with the job because of my interest in policy and the system,” he said. “I actually got to run this practice as we started it. I learned —sometimes the hard way — how you organize a team. How to hire and oversee people. I got good at management.”He also “got good” at researching and writing about his home health care experiences and was published in JAMA  (Journal of the American Medical Association). USA TODAY picked up the story and ran a feature on the topic. He started getting emails and phone calls asking him to speak on the subject.He found the biggest takeaway from the world of home- and community-based care was that nurses, physical therapists, social workers, health aids and hospice caregivers weren’t connected.“I realized, when I saw the people in their homes, … I couldn’t solve all their problems myself,” he explained. “An occasional brief doctor’s visit wasn’t enough.“From then on, the whole focus of my work is how we better connect home care, visiting nurses, hospice care and community help with medical hospitals,” he said.At the Cleveland Clinic doctors and nurses added management to home care and post-acute care programs. The program jumped from a few doctors to hundreds.“The Cleveland Clinic was founded on a very simple concept,” he said. “Physicians should be working in teams to provide excellent care rather than as entrepreneurs focused on a small solo business.“I never would be doing what I’m doing (at the VNA) without this experience,” he added. “To sum it up in one word: teamwork.“It’s now the keyword at the Visiting Nurses Association which is very invested in employee engagement and physician investment,” Landers said.But he acknowledges Cleveland and New Jersey are very different. “I am also learning from the VNA,” he said. “This is a 100-year-old organization with an incredible community. There are things being done here Cleveland never did in terms of public health service and nonmedical outreach in high poverty areas.”The VNA’s reputation is one reason he took the job. Another is the chance to be a CEO of an independent organization who can drive strategy, learn different skills and report to a board of directors.Mindy Minerva, board trustee at VNA Health Group and former board chairman of the VNA Health Group Foundation, said they are pleased with their decision to hire Landers, whom she called intelligent, passionate and accomplished.“It was very clear to all of us on the search committee that Dr. Steve Landers was uniquely qualified and the visionary leader we needed to navigate through a rapidly changing health care system and unprecedented shifts in population demographics,” she wrote in an email. “We all felt that VNA Health Group and the state would benefit from his expertise and leadership.”Since he joined in 2012 the VNA has doubled in size and budget, he said. It now employs more than 2,100 employees throughout the state and financially has been in the black since 2013 after being in the red from 2010 to 2012, Landers said, adding he believes finances should be transparent.“It’s a practical business thing: if finances are transparent people can work to impact it,” he explained.As an example, he cites nurses. “Nurses are the most respected, respectable, high integrity people in the world,” he said. “If you just show them what’s going on with their organization, where we are and where you’re trying to get to, it makes the job of management a lot easier because they can help you get there.”Landers said he balanced the budget through “lots of fundraising, lots of grants” that existed before, but he streamlined. He also built new partnerships with hospitals that didn’t exist, including Robert Wood Johnson and St. Barnabas.“I’m a firm believer in-home and community-based care is one of the keys to the future and success of our country’s health care,” Landers said. “As people age and have challenges they want to be home.” Government programs and families can’t afford for patients to be unnecessarily hospitalized and institutionalized. “There’s a lot we can do to help people avoid some of that cost and suffering,” he said.The VNA is not just for old people, he adds.“We do a lot of work with younger families and children … who are either growing up in poverty or facing social risks,” he said. “We also work with families from all economic backgrounds who have a child that is not developmentally on track or has a terrible diagnoses.“We help a lot of families with kids who want to get them home from the hospital, but they need IVs or infusion of meds, or pediatric cancer treatment, or surgery.”With the teamwork Landers talks about, these families get the help they need.last_img read more

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Junior Bombers hit the win column, double Rockers 40-20.

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsThe  L.V. Rogers Junior Bombers finally got into the win column.LVR rode the fine play from Devyn Parker and Jayden Roch to double the Stanley Humphries Rockers 40-20 in West Kootenay Junior Girl’s Basketball action Tuesday at the Hangar.“Finally, a Junior Bomber win,” said head coach Val Gibson.Parker and Roch each finished the game scoring 12 points. Rookie Sabine Stroich and Savanna Dawson also chipped in on the scoresheet.“All but two players scored at lead one hoop,” Gibson said.The Bombers improve to 1-6 on the season and returns to action following the semester break.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Kootenay rinks bounce back into the win column at Senior Men’s in Trail

first_imgCranbrook’s Tom Shypitka stopped the bleeding his Kootenay rink was experiencing during Thursday’s action at the Tim Horton’s BC Senior Men’s Curling Championships Thursday in Trail.Shypitka, third Fred Thomson of Nelson, second Don Freschi of Trail and Bill King of Fruitvale, broke open a close game with a combined five points in the fifth and sixth ends to double Kelowna’s Garry Gelowitz 8-4 during Draw six.The win hallted a two-game losing streak and powered Shypitka into a two-way tie for second with Mel Steffin of the Royal City Curling Club at the eight-team Championship. Both rinks are 4-2.Craig Lepine of Langley leads the field with a 5-1 record after dumping Rick Pughe of New Westminster 7-3.Myran Nichol of Castlegar, the other Kootenay rink entered, also managed to bounce back into the win column with an 8-4 victory over winless Ken Teskey of Williams Lake.Nichol, third Rick Brown, second Terry Kryzcka and lead Rob Babiarz, at 3-3, is locked in a three-way tie for fourth. The final round robin draw goes Friday at 9 a.m. with Shypitka facing Teskey and Nichol up against Gelowitz.Lepine battles Steffin while the two New Westminster rinks, Wes Craig and Rick Pughe, play in the other match.Playoffs follow with the first round set for 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Friday.The Teresa Hiram rink of Grand Forks lost both games Thursday to sit at 1-5 in the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Women’s Curling Championships at the Trail Club.Hiram, third Rhonda Lee Bedard, second Rose Beauchamp and lead indy Pettapiece lost 12-3 to Brenda Ridgeway of Nanaimo  and 9-4 to Wendy Cseke of Salmon Arm Thursday.Hiram meets winless Cheryl Wyatt of Terrace Friday.Karen Lepine of Langley leads the women’s standings with a 6-0 mark.Ridgeway is 5-1 while Debbie Jones-Walker of Nanaimo is third at 4-2.last_img read more

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LVR opens hardcourt season with silver showing in Silver City

first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers opened the 2013-14 High School Boy’s Basketball season with a second-place finish at the J. Lloyd Crowe Hawks Invitational Tournament Saturday in Trail.Kalamalka Lakers of Vernon outlasted the Bombers 80-55 in the tourney final.”Kal exposed our man to man defense which needs work,” said Bomber rookie head coach Jeremy Phelan.”Everyone was picking up unnecessary foul calls and had to be sat.””The game was close up to this point where the bench players had to come into the rotation,” Phelan added.Kalamalka held leads of18-10 after first quarter; 35-21 at half and 59-37 after three quarters.”Tobin stepped up his game from the previous day and was more effective against Kal,” Phelan explained. “He scored 14 points but was hampered with foul trouble throughout the game and was player of the game for us.”Bjorn Morris also had 14 points for the Bombers while Ethan Perkins finished with eight points along with a number of steals leading to fast break points.Josh Matosevic again showed he belongs on the senior squad, playing big minutes and scoring seven points.LVR opened the four-team tournament by stopping host Crowe Hawks 53-35.Morris, named player of the game, led the Bombers with 14 points — 12 in the second half.LVR held period leads of 8-7 after one quarter, 23-14 at half and 38-23 after three quarters.Avery Kushner led the Bombers with his strong play.LVR then bounced School District rival Mount Sentinel  Wildcats 58-31.Perkins, Morris and Matosevic were tops scorers for LVR witih eight, 15 and 10 points, respectively.”Everyone got on the scoresheet again, but Mount Sentinel zoned us an we had trouble running our offense.”last_img read more

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CFL Grey Cup — more than just a football game

first_imgWas it, or wasn’t it? Was it or wasn’t it a bad call, or was it or wasn’t it a great game.The 2014 Grey Cup delivered it’s share of glitz and glimmer and, at the same time, some controversy as the Calgary Stampeders hung on to clip the Hamilton Tiger Cats 20-16 Sunday before 52,000 plus fans of Canadian Football at BC Place in Vancouver.This time your’s truly got to experience the game from the fans point of view, sitting at the 50-yard line behind the Stamp bench after getting the media treatment during previous Grey Cups in Vancouver.But even before fans watching on television saw crazy spectators in action in the stands, those, including myself, witnessed craziness on the streets outside BC Place.Fans from throughout the CFL lined up to attend the tailgate party next to the Terry Fox statue and the Plaza of Nations.Cheerleaders from Calgary, Hamilton and BC, along with live bands, entertained the fans who began streaming into the stadium the moment the doors opened.Dressed in their favourite team colours, and yes there were even Lions faithful donning the painted faces and kooky costumes, fans joined in with the traditional “Fan Parade” complete with the Grey Cup, on Robson Street.The scene was reminiscent of what I experienced in 2010 during the Winter Olympics.”Bought our tickets back in December,” a dressed up Hans from Saskatchewan in Rider garb said from the Plaza of Nations tailgate party.”I’ve been to the last four Cups. I enjoy meeting the people and having fun,” Hans said when asked about if he’s disappointed the Riders didn’t make it back to defend the Cup won in 2013 in Regina. Inside the game was, well, a little boring as Calgary toyed with the Tiger Cats through the first half.And whoever organized the halftime show had better give their heads a shake.While the Imagine Dragons, an American Indie rock band from Las Vegas, rocked BC Place, only a third of the fans — not including me — got a chance to see the act live as the stage blocked out most of the people in the seats.Gotta love organizers catering to the television audience instead of the people who paid big bucks to see the game live.Back to the game, Hamilton somehow made it a game, moving the ball down the field and rallying from a 17-7 halftime deficit.However, instead of touchdowns all the Cats could materialize were field goals.Then with time running out, and Calgary punting the ball to the Tiger Cats spark plug Brandon Banks, the unthinkable happened.Like he did in the Eastern Final to Montreal, Banks took the ball from deep in his territory, first broke to his left before reversing the field and running the ball some 90-plus yards into the end zone.However, it was all for not as Hamilton’s Taylor Reed was whistled for a holding penalty on the play.Hamilton fans experienced first hand what Roughrider fans felt in 2009 when an Illegal substitution resulted in too many men on the field, for Saskatchewan.David Duval had missed his field goal attempt on the play but got another chance, and nailed it, to give Montreal the championship.The game, at that point, was for all intense and purpose, over.Zach Collaros tried to initiate a late-game rally, but the Hamilton quarterback was a sacks twice, the final play resulting his “Hail-Mary” pass being deflected out of his hands. “We left too many points on the field,” said a Hamilton fan during a Global TV interview from outside BC Place. “Too many points.”And one too many holding calls.last_img read more

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Prince Charles turns tables on Bombers

first_imgPrince Charles then held off a late charge by LVR to secure the win, the second in a week for the East Kootenay squad.The game was the second time in a week the Bombers led a lead slip away. Prince Charles turned the tables on the host Bombers in the third quarter to edge L.V. Rogers 94-90 in Kootenay High School Boy’s Basketball action Tuesday afternoon at the Hangar.Trailing 46-38 at the half, the Creston-based squad outscored LVR 29-13 to erase the deficit.last_img

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Karran scores late lifting Leafs into 3-3 tie against Rockies

first_imgThe Nelson Leafs needed some late-game heroics to steal a point from the Columbia Valley Rockies in Kootenay International Junior Hockey League action Saturday night at the NDCC Arena.Jack Karran scored with 11 seconds remaining in the third period to pull the Leafs into a 3-3 tie with the Eddie Mountain Division squad.The single-point allows the Leafs to complete an early-season home stand with a 2-1-1 record.After netting a dozen Friday against Fernie, the Leafs fell behind early against the Rockies as Brennan Nelson and Joshua Antunes scored less than four minutes into the game to give the visitors a quick 2-0 advantage.Jackson Zimmermann, with his first of two on the night, cut the margin in half, with a goal on the power play late in the opening frame. Despite out shooting the Rockies 18-5 in the second period, Nelson failed to solve goalie Ben Kelsch. The former Leaf continually frustrated the home side shooters with some amazing saves.In the third it appeared Columbia Valley would have just enough offence to steal the road victory when Robert Butterwick put the puck past Quinn Yeager in the Leaf nets to give the visitors a 3-1 lead.However, Zimmermann scored with seven minutes remaining to set the stage for Karran to pot the equalizer.Nelson dominated the Rockies during the final 50 minutes of the game, out shooting the visitors 42-12 for a 52-21 game advantage.Kelsch was the obvious game star for Columbia Valley, which earned its first point of the season in four games.Karran took the player-of-the-game honour for the Leafs.Nelson, third in the Murdoch Division, now sets out on a three-game road trip with stops Friday in Spokane and Saturday in Creston.The Leafs travel to Grand Forks Friday, September 29th before returning home Saturday, September 30th to face the Creston Valley Thunder Cats at 7 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.last_img read more

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SAN CARLOS STAKES QUOTES (SATURDAY MARCH 12, 2016)

first_imgTRAINER QUOTES PETER EURTON, KOBE’S BACK, WINNER: Did you see how he came out of the gate? He broke too fresh, and that was good. He’s just good right now. He’s the best he’s been in so long. Gary hustled him a little bit and then he kind of let him fall back.”“He’ll probably run next at Churchill Downs on Derby Day (May 7 in the Churchill Downs Stakes at seven furlongs).” TYLER BAZE, COASTLINE, SECOND: “I had a beautiful trip. I didn’t really know how much he would eat the dirt, but I watched the replays from his dirt races and it looked like he had handled dirt in the face just fine. I really kind of let him run his race. I wanted to be patient with him going from six and a half down the hill to seven eighths, I think the distance is never a question with him, but I wanted to make sure I timed it right – especially when I had to thread the needle through a haystack. He ran really good.” JOCKEY QUOTES FLAVIEN PRAT, CALCULATOR, THIRD: “I had a good race, he [Calculator] had his shot and he was a little bit aggressive on the back side. That’s my only regret but overall, we had a good trip. He’s a good horse and he’s going to improve anyway so I’m happy with that race.” GARY STEVENS, KOBE’S BACK, WINNER: “It was the best he’s ever broken. I’ve been aboard him in a couple of workouts in the mornings, before his last race and again last week and there have been a few times that he’s wanted to go after horses in front of him and I’ve let him. What I found out is that he’s not only a great stretch runner but he’s a good turn runner. And that wasn’t the case last year. With a little time off and the addition of blinkers he seems a lot more focused.“He’s running on the turn so he’s gaining ground and doesn’t have to work so hard in the stretch. It gives me a lot of confidence. I knew at the half-mile pole that they were all in deep water and that’s a pretty good feeling.”“Pete’s got him figured out.” NOTES: The winning owners Lee and Susan Searing of Rancho Cucamonga who race as C R K Stable.last_img read more

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first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Oct. 6, 2016)–With the temporary rail set at 30 feet, Hillhouse High broke alertly from her number two post position and cruised to a front-running one length win under Santiago Gonzalez in Thursday’s $55,000 allowance feature at Santa Anita. Trained by Richard Baltas, the 5-year-old Kentucky-bred mare by Exchange Rate got a flat mile on turf in 1:33.96.Based in New York prior to shipping west to Baltas this past summer at Del Mar, Hillhouse High ran a big second in her Southern California debut going one mile on grass Aug. 20.The (Richard) Mandella filly (Into The Mystic) that beat her down there is a nice horse and she only got beat a head,” said Baltas. “This is a nice mare and I’ve always thought that. Today, with her speed and the rail being out, I thought she would be very tough.”Off at 7-2 in a field of seven fillies and mares three and up, Hillhouse High paid $9.20, $4.40 and $2.60.Owned by Golden Eagle Farm Investment, L.P. she picked up $33,000 for the win, increasing her earnings to $268,487. She improved her overall mark to 19-3-6-4.Fifth and on the move leaving the three furlong pole, runner-up Amboseli cut to the rail and was moving well at the wire as she finished 2 ¼ lengths in front of favored Barleysugar. Ridden by Mike Smith, Amboseli was off at 2-1 and paid $3.20 and $2.60.Irish-bred Barleysugar, ridden by Gary Stevens, rallied three-wide turning for home but was no match for the top two. Off at 9-5, she paid $2.40 to show.Fractions on the race were 23.43, 47.09, 1:10.35 and 1:22.01.First post time on Friday at Santa Anita for an eight-race card is at 1 p.m. Admission gates open at 11 a.m.last_img read more

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