July 2019

Organisers of some of the growing number of Disabi

first_imgOrganisers of some of the growing number of Disability Pride events being held across the country have explained why they are so important to disabled people.On Saturday 14 July, the second Disability Pride Brighton will take place, followed two months later, on 16 September, by a Disability Pride celebration in Norwich.They follow Disability Pride events that took place last December in York and Bromley, south London, both organised around the UN’s International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD).The first Disability Pride Brighton took place last year, and was founded by disabled campaigner Jenny Skelton, who decided to hold an awareness-raising event in the city after one of her three adopted disabled children was thrown out of a pub because of her impairment.Skelton said: “I think it is essential that disabled people can have pride in who they are and that disability discrimination awareness continues to be raised.”She said she would like to see an annual Disability Pride festival in every city*.She said: “I believe that Disability Pride is such an obviously great thing and people are realising that it is essential to be able to celebrate being who they are.“People have heard about Disability Pride events and want to hold their own, which can only be a wonderful step towards eradicating disability discrimination.”This year’s Disability Pride Brighton, which will again be run by disabled people, aims to raise awareness of disability, reduce isolation for disabled people, and “engage with and inform the non-disabled community, whilst hosting a great day out”.A parade along Brighton’s promenade will be led by carnival band Unified Rhythm. More than four-fifths of the band’s members are disabled.The event will be opened by disabled artist Alison Lapper, Skelton and Brighton’s mayor, Dee Simson, with attractions including live music, performances and speeches by disabled people, and work by disabled artists.Funding has come from organisations including Sussex Community Foundation, Brighton & Hove Buses, and People’s Health Trust.Norfolk’s Disability Pride event will also feature a parade and celebrate disabled people and the diversity of the community, and will showcase local disabled artists, performers and speakers.It is being run at The Forum, in Norwich, by the disabled people’s organisation Equal Lives, in partnership with The Forum, Norwich City Council, Norfolk County Council and University of East Anglia.Other events will take place before and after the day itself, including a performance on 12 September of A Very Queer Nazi Faust (pictured), an experimental participatory performance created by Norfolk-based poet, artist and disability rights campaigner Vince Laws, which highlights issues around cuts to disability benefits and also celebrates gay rights.Penny Parker, membership development officer at Equal Lives, said: “We want to get the message out there that we are disabled people and proud of it and no one should be afraid to be who they are.”She pointed to the “increasingly negative attitudes” towards disabled people that have arisen during the years of austerity, and she said that events like Disability Pride were “emerging to show a positive image of disability”.She said: “Far from the workshy layabouts portrayed, disabled people are out there getting on with their lives, working, performing, dancing, taking part in sports, being parents, owning homes, going on holiday and all the other things that go with living an independent and fulfilling life.”She added: “Disability Pride events are a way of raising awareness and encouraging disabled people to get out there and give things a go.“They are also there to provide disabled people the support and adjustments to be able to do so.“Our Disability Pride event is particularly keen to also promote the work of local groups and organisations who offer services, support and a huge range of activities and opportunities.“Businesses are also a focus of our event as there is some excellent work going on to make products and services more accessible but too often the focus is on the businesses that are not doing anything.“We hope that the positive demonstration of what can be achieved when businesses and disabled people work together will encourage other businesses to follow suit.”Last December, York Disability Pride ran over three days on 1, 2 and 3 December 2017 and was organised by York Independent Living Network, York: Human Rights City and Explore York.It was about “being loud, proud and out there when it comes to disability, impairment and health conditions” and recognised “both the barriers, discrimination and exclusions disabled people face” and the contributions they make to their communities and societies.Bromley Disability Pride also took place on 3 December and was organised by the user-led group Bromley Experts by Experience (Bromley XbyX).It will be building on last year’s experience with another Disability Pride event in December.Barry McDonald, peer development worker for Bromley XbyX, said: “If people can be proud to be LGBT+, we can be proud to be disabled.“We deserve the same recognition and we have to start somewhere. The events are small but show that disabled people have talents and a voice – I think there is a growing demand for this and rightly so.“Celebrating disability pride gives people a platform to be proud of themselves and not shy of showing that they have got talents.“These events give disabled people an important and rare chance to grow as people in a supportive environment.“This can help grow people’s self-esteem and confidence and bring out skills and ways to express themselves and their personalities in ways that can be difficult in day-to-day life due to the barriers we face.”*Jenny Skelton is happy to offer advice to disabled people in other parts of the country who are considering setting up a Disability Pride festival. They can email her at: chair@disabilitypridebrighton.comPicture by Ann Nichollslast_img read more

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District 9 Candidates on Lack of Affordable Housing in SF Mission

first_imgThe first affordable housing development for the Mission District in a decade — at 1950 Mission St. — just held its first meeting last week and will break ground at the end of 2017. Why has so little affordable housing been built in the neighborhood in the midst of a housing crisis?Respuestas en español aquí. Iswari España, Training Officer with the San Francisco Human Services AgencyI have attended dozens of community meetings and have spoken with residents, business owners, labor workers, general contractors and community based developers, in the district and everyone concurs that city policies and procedures in developing RFPs [requests for proposal] and processing construction permits are the core of the problem. In addition, our city government continues to rely on trickle-down economics using a hands-off approach for regulations. We need to expedite and reform that process, we need to realistically allocate funding to increase staff capacity to deal with the situation and always hold our representatives accountable. 0% Darcel Jackson, caterer and formerly homeless app makerI think there is not enough political will. I would support mixed use development. Having been without housing in the city I love I feel so much passion for those that suffer for lack of. We are a strong and vibrant community if we work together we can create a more inclusive community maintain the old residents and welcome the newcomers and take care of our underserved. If we continue to do thing the same way we will get the same results. We are the Mission we can do better!Edwin Lindo, Vice-President of External Affairs at the Latino Democratic ClubThere is no excuse for why it has taken so long to build affordable housing in the Mission. Our community has needed it, the funds have been there, but political will and fire from our representatives has been lacking. It wasn’t until our community organized that we saw movement from those in City Hall to address the affordability crisis, and thankfully this organizing spread across the city. I am proud to stand with organizations like Our Mission No Eviction and others throughout the neighborhood that demand more to address this crisis.We deserve a Supervisor that unequivocally stands with the community and is proactive of the neighborhood’s needs.Hillary Ronen, Chief of Staff for Supervisor David CamposThe affordability crisis was denied by the Mayor, the conservative majority on the Board of Supervisor, and the Chronicle until 2013 when Supervisor Campos, the Tenants Union, and Mission Housing activists released a study by the Budget and Legislative Analyst showing irrefutable numbers that we were in a crisis.In the 2 years and 6 month since that time Campos and the District 9 community have worked at a fevered pace to push affordable housing projects through our lengthy planning process. The result has been 480 units of affordable housing in the pipeline with hundreds more on the way.As Supervisor I will continue this work and have pledged to build 5,000 units of affordable housing in the next 10 years.Melissa San Miguel, education advocateWe need to build more affordable housing in San Francisco. Unfortunately, this important issue gets wrapped up in today’s petty politics and we’re unable to make any progress. We need to develop a comprehensive approach to solving this problem, and not depend on one off negotiations and variances.I grew up in the Mission. My family lives here. My friends live here. I am dedicated to making sure people can find an affordable place to live here. Let’s eliminate the pervasive income inequality, horrible housing situation, and clear lack of will by our electeds to get things done. It’s time for homegrown leadership that can get things done.Joshua Arce, civil rights attorney and Community Liaison for Laborers Local 261The status quo has failed. A lack of leadership in our District has seen the community alienated. To get serious about this crisis, the community must have a seat at the table. We must work cooperatively with all parties to resolve the ongoing conflicts.As Secretary of the Board for the nonprofit spearheading this project, I’m proud we’re finally building more affordable housing (160 units) in the Mission than has been built in the last 8 years. I’ve worked hard with many others to move this project forward despite years of inactivity by our City Hall representatives.This is the sort of leadership our community deserves from their next Supervisor.43 Questions is a weekly series — started 43 weeks before Election Day — to question the candidates running for District 9 supervisor. Send us questions to info@missionlocal.com and let us know in comments or in an email if you think candidates have answered as asked. center_img Tags: election 2016 Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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SF Musician and Teacher Builds Bridges Between Local Culture and SF Symphony

first_img 0% Over the course of nearly a decade, Mission District music teacher Martha Rodriguez Salazar helped Latino song and tradition find a permanent home at the San Francisco Symphony.Now in its ninth year, the Symphony’s annual Día de los Muertos concert will again return to Davies Symphony Hall on Saturday October 5. As curator of the festival and music advisor for the concert, Rodriguez Salazar invites local and international performers – dancers, musicians and artists – to fill the Davies Symphony Hall with colorful altars, vibrant installations, art and song, paying homage to the Mexican tradition of honoring the dead.The inception of the concert was a significant step in infusing Latino culture and music into an institution “traditionally viewed as something like a golden cage,” she said. “Its an interesting place to work at the Symphony – It’s very much thought of as white culture, elitist, and in a way it is,” said Rodriguez Salazar. “But at the same time my experience with them has been such a positive one because they are very much willing to open their doors to new things.”In 2008, the Symphony enlisted Rodriguez Salazar to bring the traditionally Latino celebration – and a more diverse audience – to its halls.“I knew Martha for many, many years. I thought that both her knowledge of music and her knowledge of Mexican culture was a really good combination,” said Salvador Acevedo, a consultant to the Symphony. “I introduced her – the rest is history.”Sylvia Sherman, the program director at the Mission Community Music Center, added: “We speak about her as a bridge builder. Martha is eminently bicultural. She can in an instant relate completely to the experience of immigrant families in the program where she works. And she can flip and relate to other parts of the community.”Rodriguez Salazar took on the role as curator of the pre-concert festivities at Davies Hall, as well as being the concert’s musical advisor. Under her tenure, the Symphony has hosted a slew of  “Mexican conductors, sopranos, tenors, mariachi, storytellers and dancers,” said Acevedo, adding that it has grown over the years from hosting one concert to two in one day, and drawing a multi-generational audience from the Latino community and beyond. “Through this concert and us putting our foot there, they realize how important it is to include Latin American repertoire,” said Rodriguez Salazar.Earlier in the month, the Symphony began decorating Davies Symphony Hall. Photo by Lydia ChávezA Monarch butterfly facing South – “a symbol of migration,” Rodriguez Salazar said – is one of the many installations adorning the concert hall this year and aims to provide political context on the issue of immigration for those in attendance.This year’s concerts are headlined by the Los Angeles-based group La Santa Cecilia, as well as the first all-female mariachi group Mariachi Flor de Toloache, out of New York – bringing a unique and young twist to to the concert hall, said Rodriguez Salazar. “La Santa Cecilia addresses a lot the situation of Latino immigration and the unfairness of things,” she said, while Mariachi Flor de Toloache showcases “not just the traditional mariachi, but people who can bring a political stance into the performance as well – a young interpretation of what their culture is and what it means to be in the United States.” Hailing from Mexico City, Rodriguez Salazar knows the importance of understanding one’s roots.  She was a gifted flute player as a child, and at age 29 immigrated to the United States to study fine arts at Mills College in Oakland.“I had only planned on staying two to three years,” she said, smiling. But Rodriguez Salazar said she became fascinated by San Francisco’s strong Latino presence, and some two decades later, she has married her passion for music and a deep appreciation for her own culture. “When I picked up that flute many years ago I never thought I’d be in a place doing what I’m doing now, and giving hope to a lot of people,” said Rodriguez Salazar, who currently resides in Bernal Heights with her wife and stepson – both are musicians in their own right. Her wife plays the accordion and her stepson plays the bass. Rodriguez Salazar is a core member of the Bernal Hill Players, a classic and contemporary chamber music ensemble, and was recognized as a “Luminary” by the Mexican Consulate in San Francisco in 2011.  She credits the Mission’s Community Music Center, an almost century-old nonprofit housed in an old Victorian on near Capp and 20th streets, for some of her most formative community work over the past 15 years.  Out of the center, she has directed “La Posarela,” an annual theater production offering a modern depiction of the nativity scene centered around immigration.Sherman, of the music center, called the reenactment of the Mexican tradition in relationship to current issues “a creative endeavor that allows the youth that participate in that program to reflect on our reality.”Rodriguez Salazar also heads the scholarship-based Young Musician’s program, teaching low-income, primarily Latino youth music through private lessons and ensembles. With extensive training as a flutist and opera singer, Rodriguez Salazar does not only share her love for music with the Mission’s youth, but also with its elders. Bridging generational iniquities, she conducts four senior choirs through the music center’s adult choir program – a partnership of 11 senior centers throughout the city. That program, she said, “transformed my view of what a community is, what music is for the community, and what my role as an artist and teacher could be in the way of transforming lives for real.”Rodriguez Salazar said she sees her work with the choirs as creating an “opportunity for people to get together and to think that they are of value.”“They can sing. They can attend and feel part of something important. They can be out of their houses,” she said. Under Rodriguez Salazar’s direction, the senior choirs have also found space at the Symphony’s Dia de los Muertos celebration – performing in the Symphony’s lobby.   center_img Tags: community music center • dia de los muertos • Music Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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Photos An SF Mission District Night

first_imgIt’s 11 p.m. but the night has just begun for this 14 bus and driver.Photo by Daniel MondragónI spent 24 months in NYC. I stand facing south on Mission at 20th and I feel I am home again.Photo by Daniel MondragónEl Farolito at 24th and Mission.Photo by Daniel MondragónI am stopped at Shotwell where “rapper” Dre gives me a hot 16 bars and asks me to photograph him. He is quite talented and represents “The Bay all Day!’ Photo by Daniel MondragónThe best time to do laundry is Thursday night. Photo by Daniel MondragónI come across a man who lives nearby Chico produce on 24th. One shop’s trash is another man’s perfectly good papaya.Photo by Daniel MondragónNight Rider roars on his hog around York street while playing oldies music. I feel him in his element. Photo by Daniel Mondragon Photo by Daniel Mondragón The Tarot Van on Valencia. Donations are accepted. Photo by Daniel MondragónThese musicians on Valencia set the mood for hundreds of passerby’s.Photo by Daniel MondragónLocals have their fortune read in the Tarot Van on 16th & Valencia on a Friday night. Mr. Cha Dao pictured on the left. Photo by Daniel MondragónThe food in the Mission is the best because it’s secret ingredient is Love.Photo by Daniel Mondragón 0%center_img Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

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Lewis Baxter Ben Betts Harry Brooks and Lewis Do

first_imgLewis Baxter, Ben Betts, Harry Brooks and Lewis Dodd join Zack Lee, twin brothers Harvey and Keenan McDaid, Jamie Pye and Jumah Sambou in penning deals with the club.Player Performance Manager Neil Kilshaw said: “Following a very successful scholarship programme we are delighted to welcome our new nine signings into the under 19s Academy.“All nine have consistently demonstrated hard work and commitment, alongside natural talent for Rugby League and we are excited about their potential development in the next few years.“They are a credit to their community clubs, schools and all those coaches that have an involvement in their development over the years.“The players will now finish their under 16s season with their respective community clubs before we integrate them into the under 19s squad for the 2019 season.”The PlayersLewis Baxter is a back row forward from Wigan St Judes. He is a great line runner and scored four tries in five games in Scholarship programme this season.Ben Betts is a second row forward from Leigh Miners. He is an athletic, determined character with a huge work-rate in both facets of the game.Harry Brooks played his junior rugby at Liverpool Lions before moving to Blackbrook. He is a hard-working prop who stands at 6ft 5”. Despite his young age he has shown a lot of potential already and will continue to improve.Lewis Dodd is an outstanding half back who plays for the successful Halton Hornets side who are in the Under 16s National Cup Final. He has represented England u16s, possesses a great kicking game and is mature beyond his years.Zack Lee is a strong defensive forward who carries the ball hard. He joined our Scholarship programme from Wigan after playing at Shevington.Harvey McDaid is a skilful fullback from Halton Hornets. He represented Wales in their successful under 16s performance v England.His twin brother Keenan is a tough, energetic hooker from the Hornets. He has represented Wales too.Jamie Pye is a prop forward from Thatto Heath. He is a tough, uncompromising forward who hits and carries hard.Finally, Jumah Sambou is from Woolston Rovers. He is a strong and skilful centre, with lots of natural talent, and should go well at Academy level.The players will be presented to the fans at half time on Friday.last_img read more

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Although the Vikings sit at the foot of the Betfre

first_imgAlthough the Vikings sit at the foot of the Betfred Super League table they pushed Hull FC all the way at the weekend.“They aren’t far off at all,” Saints Head Coach said. “They played well on the road and made a strong Hull side work hard. They obviously haven’t been winning but they are trying hard and I’m sure a win is coming.“We have to make sure we don’t drop our game because if we do then we could be in trouble.”Saints head into the match on the back of an exciting win over Wakefield that ebbed and flowed.Trinity scored four tries in 20 minutes to overturn a 20-6 half time deficit only for Holbrook’s side to reply with three in seven to take the spoils.“In the first half we really dominated and they came up with a high risk play,” Justin added. “If the pass had been right we would have gone the length of the field and been 30-0 up.“In the second half we did a lot of things we wouldn’t normally do. We kicked out a couple of times, dropped the ball and gave away a lot of penalties too.“As a result we didn’t see the ball for a lot of the time. They are a big side and a good attacking team and took advantage.“But we scored three quick tries to get back in front and I was really happy with that. We were unlucky at the end too – Percy is half a touch away from getting that strip and scoring.”Holbrook says he will leave it until later in the week to decide on the fitness of Ben Barba whilst Ryan Morgan will need an assessment on the knock to his head he suffered in Friday’s match.“Tommy Makinson also has a bump on his knee,” Justin added. “We will check on all these players as the week goes on, but we do have options there.”Tickets for Friday’s game, which kicks off at 8pm, remain on sale from the Ticket Office at the Totally Wicked Stadium, by calling 01744 455 052 or online here.last_img read more

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Wilmington man charged with Greensboro mall murder

first_img According to a news release from the Greensboro Police Department, the search for McClary spanned across three states.On May 4, Sherrod Maurice Crum, 34, was walking outside of the mall when he was struck by at least one bullet fired from a car that drove past him. An ambulance took Crum to Moses Cone Hospital where he was pronounced dead.A detective from the Greensboro Police Department’s Violent Criminal Apprehension launched a 30 day search and tracked McClary from North Carolina through Virginia to Pennsylvania.Related Article: Suspect in synagogue attack stuns family with radical turnU.S. Marshals in Pennsylvania arrested McClary on August 11. He was charged with outstanding warrants out of New Hanover County for two counts of Possession of a Stolen Firearm, Trafficking in Opium or Heroin, Selling Heroin, and other crimes he allegedly committed several years before the Greensboro shooting.He was kept in a Philadelphia prison until he was extradited to New Hanover County on Saturday.That’s where he was served with the warrant for First Degree Murder. He is awaiting trial for the drug and firearms charges. Tedrick McClary (Photo: New Hanover County Sheriff’s Office) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — A Wilmington man wanted for a fatal shooting outside of the Four Seasons Town Centre  in Greensboro earlier this year is in the New Hanover County jail.Tedrick McClary, 25, is currently being held without bond.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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CAPE FEAR HISTORY MYSTERIES The Maco Station Light

first_img00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — It’s a story about a ghostly local legend about a railroad worker, Joe Baldwin, who became an unlikely hero.The Maco Station Light, for over a century a mysterious light could be seen bobbing up and down along the railroad tracks at Maco Station, a little west of Wilmington. They say that when people approach those lights they disappear.- Advertisement – In this week’s edition of Cape Fear History & Mysteries, hear the haunting story about the Maco Station Light.Check out the video above to learn more.Then visit WWAYTV3.com/history-mysteries each Thursday for another installment of “Cape Fear History & Mysteries.”last_img read more

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Bladen County emergency officials prep for possible wintry weather

first_img Bladen County’s Emergency Services Director Bradley Kinlaw says they have made sure their equipment is running and working properly.They also plan to stay in touch with the Red Cross and Social Services in case they need them. All emergency services staff will be on standby Wednesday night.Kinlaw encourages people to stay off the roads if the weather is bad.Related Article: Red Cross works one-on-one with North Carolina residentsSome people have been out already, the Sunoco Gas Station Assistant Manager Amanda Keith says people have stopped by all day long but she hopes the snow stays away.“It’s been kinda steady, its not been too bad,” Keith said. “It’s been kinda slow, but also ya know kinda quite. You got your regulars trying to gas up make sure they have everything that they need.”Keith says she has seen most people stopping by getting things last minute before they head home for the night. Bladen County emergency officials prepared for chance of snow on Jan. 17, 2018. (Photo:l Jenna Kurzyna) BLADEN COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — As snow blankets many large cities across the state the Governer has declared a state of emergency.While we’re not expected to see anything like Raleigh or Greensboro, there are some places in our area that could see some accumulation including Bladen County.- Advertisement – last_img read more

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Sea turtle nesting season starts along Cape Fear coast

first_img The nesting season runs roughly from May through August. Sea turtle hatchings begin in July and may continue into October.Beachgoers are reminded to follow these tips if they come across a sea turtle on shore.Stay at least 25 feet away from any turtle.Do not approach a crawling turtle. She may leave before nesting if feeling threatened.Do not use a flashlight or flash bulb if come across a sea turtle at night.Be quiet and still. Noise and motion can be perceived as threatening.Keep exterior lights off, or shielded, from the oceanfront if property is oceanfront.Keeps pets away from sea turtles and nest sites.Alert the sea turtle project nearest to the nest so they can tag and protect the nest.Call the statewide sea turtle emergency number (252-241-7367) if spot a sick or injured turtle.For more information, go to www.seaturtle.org/groups/ncwrc/overview.html.On average, a total of 468 sea turtles strand in North Carolina each year. SOUTHEASTERN NC (WWAY) — Today is the start of the sea turtle nesting season in the Cape Fear region.While there hasn’t been any nests seen in our area yet, it’s expected to get busy within the upcoming weeks.- Advertisement – Tracks mark the path of the first sea turtle nest of the season at Sunset Beach, which was discovered on Bird Island on May 18, 2017. (Photo: Candy Fowler)last_img read more

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