August 2020

Adopt-A-Pet Dog of the Week: Puppy

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Adopt-A-PetMeet Puppy! If expressive ears are your thing, you will love Puppy! This sweet gentlemen is 9-years-old and weights just 11.6 pounds. Because he is small, children in his new family should be older, dog-savvy and gentle.Puppy is a sweet 9-year-old that loves everyone. He just need a home to call his own. Photo courtesy: Adopt-A-PetHe has a mostly white coat with adorable brown markings on his face and years. Since Puppy loves everyone (kids, cats, and dogs!), he will make some lucky person a great forever companion.Adopt-A-Pet has many great dogs and always need volunteers. To see all our current dogs, visit the Adopt-A-Pet website, our Facebook page or at the shelter on Jensen Road in Shelton. For more information, email thedoghouse3091@hotmail.com or call 360-432-3091.last_img read more

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Saint Martin’s Abbey Announces a $500,000 Challenge Matching Gift to Science…

first_imgFacebook13Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Saint Martin’s UniversitySaint Martin’s Abbey has announced that it will make an additional $500,000 challenge matching gift towards Saint Martin’s University’s Science Initiative, a campaign to build a new 30,000-square-foot classroom and laboratory facility that will house its growing natural and physical science programs. So far the University has raised $8.31 million of the projected budget of $10 million. This will be the third gift for the Abbey in support of the Science Initiative, bringing their total commitments to $1.7 million.“This new gift paves the way for future growth and is an opportunity to tie the Abbey’s mission more closely to the University’s mission,” shared Abbot Neal Roth, OSB, major superior of Saint Martin’s Abbey and chancellor of Saint Martin’s University. “This signifies an incentive to attract others to support the University’s mission and help us work together to bring this campaign to a close.”The University hopes to break ground for the new science building in 2018, with plans to open the building for classes by Fall 2019.The Science Initiative follows Saint Martin’s successful Engineering Initiative, which led to the construction of two new buildings for its Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering: the Platinum LEED-rated 27,000-square-foot Cebula Hall in 2013 and the 17,363-square-foot Panowicz Foundry for Innovation in 2016.Since 2013, Saint Martin’s University has experienced marked growth in enrollment across all of its STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) departments. The civil and mechanical engineering programs have seen a 30 percent increase in students. This has led to a greater demand for mathematics and physics classes, which are prerequisites for engineering. In addition, biology majors have grown to represent ten percent of all University students and the chemistry department is at its highest enrollment ever.The new science building will include laboratories, classrooms, collaborative research spaces and offices. It will be strategically located near Cebula Hall and adjacent to the Panowicz Foundry for Innovation, which houses engineering, computer and industrial labs, creating a STEM complex at the core of the campus.“Saint Martin’s University is blessed to have the Abbey as its sponsor,” said Saint Martin’s University President Roy Heynderickx, Ph.D. “This gift and past gifts by the Abbey for our Science Initiative is true recognition of the importance of investment in STEM students for our greater community. The Abbey is an excellent example to all of us to live and give with heart.”For more information about the Science Initiative, including the Abbey’s challenge matching gift and other ways to support the campaign, contact Saint Martin’s Office of Institutional Advancement at advancement@stmartin.edu or 360-438-4366, or visit www.stmartin.edu/science-initiative.Saint Martin’s University is an independent, four-year, coeducational university located on a wooded campus of more than 300 acres in Lacey, Washington. Established in 1895 by the Catholic Order of Saint Benedict, the University is one of 14 Benedictine colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and the only one west of the Rocky Mountains. Saint Martin’s University prepares students for successful lives through its 25 majors and ten graduate programs spanning the liberal arts, business, education, nursing and engineering. Saint Martin’s welcomes more than 1,300 undergraduate students and 250 graduate students from many ethnic and religious backgrounds to its Lacey campus, and more students to its extended campus located at Joint Base Lewis-McChord. Visit the Saint Martin’s University website at www.stmartin.edu.last_img read more

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Intercity Transit Operates on Sunday Schedules on Independence Day

first_imgFacebook8Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Intercity TransitIntercity Transit’s local, Express and Dial-A-Lift bus services will operate Sunday schedules on Independence Day, Thursday, July 4. Customer Service at the Olympia Transit Center will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and the Community Vans program will operate by advance reservation only.Intercity Transit’s business office will be closed and there is no Village Vans service in observance of the holiday.Transit riders connecting to other systems in the region should check their holiday service schedules as most have modified schedules.For route and schedule information, visit the Intercity Transit website or contact Intercity Transit Customer Service at 360-786-1881.last_img read more

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Watch: Player runs to stands to kiss wife in celebration – while match had…

first_imgImage Courtesy: Diema SportAdvertisement A bizarre incident happened in the Bulgarian efbet League this Sunday in the match between Ludogorets Razgrad and Slavia Sofia, where the Ludogorets midfielder Wanderson ran off to kiss his wife in the stands after scoring a goal, which was already ruled out because of being offside and the game already resumed!Advertisement Image Courtesy: Diema SportThe clip was upoladed by Bulgarian football writer mshumanov to his Twitter account @shumansko. Watch the video below-One of this weekend’s funniest moments in Bulgarian football: 😘 Wanderson scoring for Ludogorets against Slavia, then celebrating by kissing his wife in the stands, without realising his goal has been ruled for offside. To top it all off, there was NO offside 😂 pic.twitter.com/EtXjsJGpteAdvertisement — mshumanov (@shumansko) August 26, 2019Advertisement The 31 year old Brazil born Bulgarian international managed to tap in a volley from inside the box by Dan Biton, and ran off to the sidelines in celebration, went near the stairs with his hands up high as his wife came down to give him a kiss.Unbeknownst to his attention, the goal had already been ruled out for being offside, and the Slavia keeper Galin Ivanov already shot the ball down the field as the game had already resumed.The match ended in a 0-0 draw at the Ludogorets Arena in Razgrad.Ludogorets are the current defending champions of the Bulgarian league, and are currently in 2nd place with 15 points, behind Levski Sofia in the league table. Slavia Sofia occupy 8th position in the table, with 9 points to their names.Ludogorets are travelling to Maribor, Slovenia on 29th August to face NK Maribor in their second leg of Europa League play off match, after a goalless first leg last week. Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgImage Courtesy: CrictrackerAdvertisement In a video which has resurfaced after nine years, Doug Bollinger’s fake hair got exposed courtesy of Hotspot. The incident took place during the second inning of an ODI in the bilateral series contested between Australia and West Indies in 2010.Advertisement Image Courtesy: CrictrackerThe hotspot is is a tool which is used extensively in the sport of cricket to aid the third umpires. Particularly used to detect edges off the batsman’s bat, it uses two infra-red cameras on either side which records continuously. If there is contact, friction occurs which causes a change in the temperature which the Hotspot detects.The Australian pacer, unfortunately, bore the brunt of it. Bowling with the new ball defending the target of 257, the Aussies got an early breakthrough with Wavell Hinds edging one right to Cameron White in the second slip. Not only did the technology detect the edge off the bat, but it also showed the bright spot on the former Chennai Super Kings pacer’s head. Check out the video below:Advertisement Hot spot exposes poor Doug Bollinger’s fake hair pic.twitter.com/419YVWPU8k— Ghumman (@emclub77) September 23, 2019Advertisement Doug Bollinger eventually shaved it all before eventually announcing his retirement from all forms of cricket in 2018.Read Also:Netizens troll KL Rahul for posting ‘chilling’ pictureJasprit Bumrah vows to make a stronger return following his injury Advertisementlast_img read more

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Navesink Arts Center Housed in Former Library Site

first_imgBy John BurtonMIDDLETOWN – Paul and Lori Renick have been working hard to make sure the building that was home to the public library branch – and continues to be for the Monmouth Players – gets a second act.“Our goal is to see this as a performing arts/visual arts center,” said Paul Renick of the former Navesink branch library at 149 Monmouth Ave.Since March, when the township’s library system closed all three of its branches, the Renicks have been working with the not-for-profit foundation that owns and maintains the structure to establish the Navesink Arts Center.Paul and Lori Renick beneath the recently cleaned portrait of Herman Duryea. It was Duryea’s foundation that built the Navesink building where the couple is establishing the Navesink Arts Center. The Highlands couple, who operate a carpentry business and have been long active with the Monmouth Players community theater group, have been working and overseeing the work at the site. The work includes new carpets – the first since 1989; a new paint job, the first in more than 20 years; refurbishing the existing tin ceiling; and general cleanup work to get the building in shape for the Monmouth Players community theater troupe’s season. That’s all happening as they move forward with plans to formally establish the arts center.The site is now hosting the Monmouth Players production of Neil Simon’s Brighton Beach Memoirs (running Oct. 18-20 and 26-27 and Nov. 2). It’s the first of four shows the company is producing this season. The Navesink Arts Center will also feature performances by local singer/songwriters on Nov. 16; and an art exhibit/sale being presented by the Beauregard Fine Art gallery, Rumson.In the future, the Renicks and the arts center will be working with the Navesink School, the K-3 grade school next door, and its parent-teacher organization to establish an art program for the students.“I don’t want just arts and crafts,” Lori Renick said. “I want real art classes … There are some real talented kids out there.”She hopes the arts center will be able to nurture that talent.The building was completed by the Duryea Foundation in 1917 in memory of its founder, Herman B. Duryea, a sportsman and thoroughbred racehorse breeder. The foundation operated the site as a cultural and community center that had a lending library – the first in Middle­town and one of the first in the state – and had tennis courts which still exist, plus a gymnasium and auditorium and even a bowling alley in its lower level, according to Michael Winchell, president of the board of directors for the Duryea-Navesink Library Association.The Duryea Foundation merged with the Navesink Library Association in 1994, establishing the new 501(c) 3, not-for-profit organization.The purpose of the foundation and its building was to be available for “social, literary, artistic and educational activities,” Winchell said.The foundation allowed the township to operate the branch library at the building, starting in 1959 with the township paying $1 a year until closing the branch in March. The township’s parks and recreation department also used the site’s tennis courts until about 10 years ago, Winchell said.Lori and Paul Renick have been involved with the Mon­mouth Players since 1993, with Paul serving as its president since 1997. The group has been putting on productions for 60 years, initially at Rumson’s Bingham Hall, then Red Bank Catholic High School and the Leonardo grammar school, before settling in at the Duryea house 57 years ago, Paul Renick said.Neither of the Renicks had a background – or even an interest – in theater when asked if they would like to help the Monmouth Players mount a production. They started by assisting with set building, then did some acting and now Paul directs some shows. “I’m a frustrated artist,” he said. “It’s my way to paint a picture.”Other than an endowment that is used for the building’s upkeep, the Monmouth Players is the only way the site generates revenue at this time – at least until a fuller slate of programs can be developed, Winchell said. The Duryea-Navesink Library Association and theater group are now discussing a merger to establish the long-term financial health of the site, he said.On the financial front, Paul Renick said he hasn’t and doesn’t plan to seek any government assistance for what he and his wife hope to do, believing the arts center can be self-sustaining. “I don’t want to be encumbered by their rules or politics,” he stressed.The site will eventually be available to the public with the former library space being dedicated as a community reading room with books available and a children’s area that will host storytime and other programs. The area also could be used as an alternative performance space that will hopefully generate some additional revenue, Lori Renick said.Further plans look toward removing the two rear tennis courts and developing a community art garden, consisting of sculptures and a winding path leading to a tranquil garden area, Lori Renick said. Those plans, however, are “crazy ambitious,” and will have to wait for a couple of years, she conceded.For now the work at the Navesink Arts Center is about continuing with the cleaning and hosting the show, they said.last_img read more

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Dr. Steven Landers: VNA Teamwork Leader

first_imgBy Gretchen Van BenthuysenWhile growing up in the Shaker Heights suburb of Cleveland, Ohio, Steve Landers’ family often could be found sitting around its kitchen table talking about what was going on in American health care.Perhaps not the most scintillating kind of conversation for a young man, but given that his father was a dentist and teacher at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and his mother was a hospital administrator with a master’s degree in business administration, it was inevitable.“I was influenced deeply by my parents. I looked up to them and found their work very interesting and worthwhile,” Landers said. “Over the years I learned a lot about the mindsets, the practicality and the sensibilities of somebody who is on the frontlines of taking care of people every day and at the same time the realities of the business of health care. I got a great perspective.”He vividly remembers them talking about the introduction of diagnostic-related grouping, a way for Medicare and health insurance companies to categorize hospital costs and determine how much to pay for a patient’s hospital stay.“You can imagine how that changed the business of hospital care,” he said with a grin during in an interview in the meeting room next to his unassuming office that features a small family photo of his three young sons and wife, a senior vice president at Prudential in Newark. “The length of stays at the hospital became a lot shorter. It actually created the part of health care I now work in — aftercare.”At 41, Landers, now living in Little Silver and loving it, is president and CEO of the Visiting Nurse Association Health Group, the nation’s second largest not-for-profit home health care organization, which serves 12 counties in New Jersey. Founded in 1912, its headquarters is at 176 Riverside Ave. in Red Bank.Last month, the VNA launched its 2020 Vision Campaign, a groundbreaking initiative to provide new, innovative and enhanced care for people in their homes and communities.Landers is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He is a member of several boards, writes numerous articles for medical journals and contributes to the Huffington Post.Previously, he was the director of the Center for Home Care and Community Rehabilitation and director of Post-Acute Operations for the Cleveland Clinic, rated the second best hospital in the United States by U.S. News and World Report.On his medical journey he became a certified family doctor and geriatrician with a special interest in geriatric medicine, home health, hospice and palliative care. What he is perhaps most passionate about is teamwork and house calls.After four years of college, four years of medical school, one year of public health school and three years of residency, Landers was asked to join the Cleveland Clinic and started a home visiting program for doctors in a high poverty neighborhood.“If you go back to the 1940s, most encounters people had with physicians in this country were in their homes,” he explained. “For a lot of reasons, that changed.”His program exploded and the clinic was overwhelmed with referrals.“I fell in love with the job because of my interest in policy and the system,” he said. “I actually got to run this practice as we started it. I learned —sometimes the hard way — how you organize a team. How to hire and oversee people. I got good at management.”He also “got good” at researching and writing about his home health care experiences and was published in JAMA  (Journal of the American Medical Association). USA TODAY picked up the story and ran a feature on the topic. He started getting emails and phone calls asking him to speak on the subject.He found the biggest takeaway from the world of home- and community-based care was that nurses, physical therapists, social workers, health aids and hospice caregivers weren’t connected.“I realized, when I saw the people in their homes, … I couldn’t solve all their problems myself,” he explained. “An occasional brief doctor’s visit wasn’t enough.“From then on, the whole focus of my work is how we better connect home care, visiting nurses, hospice care and community help with medical hospitals,” he said.At the Cleveland Clinic doctors and nurses added management to home care and post-acute care programs. The program jumped from a few doctors to hundreds.“The Cleveland Clinic was founded on a very simple concept,” he said. “Physicians should be working in teams to provide excellent care rather than as entrepreneurs focused on a small solo business.“I never would be doing what I’m doing (at the VNA) without this experience,” he added. “To sum it up in one word: teamwork.“It’s now the keyword at the Visiting Nurses Association which is very invested in employee engagement and physician investment,” Landers said.But he acknowledges Cleveland and New Jersey are very different. “I am also learning from the VNA,” he said. “This is a 100-year-old organization with an incredible community. There are things being done here Cleveland never did in terms of public health service and nonmedical outreach in high poverty areas.”The VNA’s reputation is one reason he took the job. Another is the chance to be a CEO of an independent organization who can drive strategy, learn different skills and report to a board of directors.Mindy Minerva, board trustee at VNA Health Group and former board chairman of the VNA Health Group Foundation, said they are pleased with their decision to hire Landers, whom she called intelligent, passionate and accomplished.“It was very clear to all of us on the search committee that Dr. Steve Landers was uniquely qualified and the visionary leader we needed to navigate through a rapidly changing health care system and unprecedented shifts in population demographics,” she wrote in an email. “We all felt that VNA Health Group and the state would benefit from his expertise and leadership.”Since he joined in 2012 the VNA has doubled in size and budget, he said. It now employs more than 2,100 employees throughout the state and financially has been in the black since 2013 after being in the red from 2010 to 2012, Landers said, adding he believes finances should be transparent.“It’s a practical business thing: if finances are transparent people can work to impact it,” he explained.As an example, he cites nurses. “Nurses are the most respected, respectable, high integrity people in the world,” he said. “If you just show them what’s going on with their organization, where we are and where you’re trying to get to, it makes the job of management a lot easier because they can help you get there.”Landers said he balanced the budget through “lots of fundraising, lots of grants” that existed before, but he streamlined. He also built new partnerships with hospitals that didn’t exist, including Robert Wood Johnson and St. Barnabas.“I’m a firm believer in-home and community-based care is one of the keys to the future and success of our country’s health care,” Landers said. “As people age and have challenges they want to be home.” Government programs and families can’t afford for patients to be unnecessarily hospitalized and institutionalized. “There’s a lot we can do to help people avoid some of that cost and suffering,” he said.The VNA is not just for old people, he adds.“We do a lot of work with younger families and children … who are either growing up in poverty or facing social risks,” he said. “We also work with families from all economic backgrounds who have a child that is not developmentally on track or has a terrible diagnoses.“We help a lot of families with kids who want to get them home from the hospital, but they need IVs or infusion of meds, or pediatric cancer treatment, or surgery.”With the teamwork Landers talks about, these families get the help they need.last_img read more

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Junior Bombers hit the win column, double Rockers 40-20.

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsThe  L.V. Rogers Junior Bombers finally got into the win column.LVR rode the fine play from Devyn Parker and Jayden Roch to double the Stanley Humphries Rockers 40-20 in West Kootenay Junior Girl’s Basketball action Tuesday at the Hangar.“Finally, a Junior Bomber win,” said head coach Val Gibson.Parker and Roch each finished the game scoring 12 points. Rookie Sabine Stroich and Savanna Dawson also chipped in on the scoresheet.“All but two players scored at lead one hoop,” Gibson said.The Bombers improve to 1-6 on the season and returns to action following the semester break.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Kootenay rinks bounce back into the win column at Senior Men’s in Trail

first_imgCranbrook’s Tom Shypitka stopped the bleeding his Kootenay rink was experiencing during Thursday’s action at the Tim Horton’s BC Senior Men’s Curling Championships Thursday in Trail.Shypitka, third Fred Thomson of Nelson, second Don Freschi of Trail and Bill King of Fruitvale, broke open a close game with a combined five points in the fifth and sixth ends to double Kelowna’s Garry Gelowitz 8-4 during Draw six.The win hallted a two-game losing streak and powered Shypitka into a two-way tie for second with Mel Steffin of the Royal City Curling Club at the eight-team Championship. Both rinks are 4-2.Craig Lepine of Langley leads the field with a 5-1 record after dumping Rick Pughe of New Westminster 7-3.Myran Nichol of Castlegar, the other Kootenay rink entered, also managed to bounce back into the win column with an 8-4 victory over winless Ken Teskey of Williams Lake.Nichol, third Rick Brown, second Terry Kryzcka and lead Rob Babiarz, at 3-3, is locked in a three-way tie for fourth. The final round robin draw goes Friday at 9 a.m. with Shypitka facing Teskey and Nichol up against Gelowitz.Lepine battles Steffin while the two New Westminster rinks, Wes Craig and Rick Pughe, play in the other match.Playoffs follow with the first round set for 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Friday.The Teresa Hiram rink of Grand Forks lost both games Thursday to sit at 1-5 in the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Women’s Curling Championships at the Trail Club.Hiram, third Rhonda Lee Bedard, second Rose Beauchamp and lead indy Pettapiece lost 12-3 to Brenda Ridgeway of Nanaimo  and 9-4 to Wendy Cseke of Salmon Arm Thursday.Hiram meets winless Cheryl Wyatt of Terrace Friday.Karen Lepine of Langley leads the women’s standings with a 6-0 mark.Ridgeway is 5-1 while Debbie Jones-Walker of Nanaimo is third at 4-2.last_img read more

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LVR opens hardcourt season with silver showing in Silver City

first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers opened the 2013-14 High School Boy’s Basketball season with a second-place finish at the J. Lloyd Crowe Hawks Invitational Tournament Saturday in Trail.Kalamalka Lakers of Vernon outlasted the Bombers 80-55 in the tourney final.”Kal exposed our man to man defense which needs work,” said Bomber rookie head coach Jeremy Phelan.”Everyone was picking up unnecessary foul calls and had to be sat.””The game was close up to this point where the bench players had to come into the rotation,” Phelan added.Kalamalka held leads of18-10 after first quarter; 35-21 at half and 59-37 after three quarters.”Tobin stepped up his game from the previous day and was more effective against Kal,” Phelan explained. “He scored 14 points but was hampered with foul trouble throughout the game and was player of the game for us.”Bjorn Morris also had 14 points for the Bombers while Ethan Perkins finished with eight points along with a number of steals leading to fast break points.Josh Matosevic again showed he belongs on the senior squad, playing big minutes and scoring seven points.LVR opened the four-team tournament by stopping host Crowe Hawks 53-35.Morris, named player of the game, led the Bombers with 14 points — 12 in the second half.LVR held period leads of 8-7 after one quarter, 23-14 at half and 38-23 after three quarters.Avery Kushner led the Bombers with his strong play.LVR then bounced School District rival Mount Sentinel  Wildcats 58-31.Perkins, Morris and Matosevic were tops scorers for LVR witih eight, 15 and 10 points, respectively.”Everyone got on the scoresheet again, but Mount Sentinel zoned us an we had trouble running our offense.”last_img read more

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