上海龙凤个人自荐

Nothing wrong with 777 systems

first_imgThe US crash investigator the National Transportation Safety Board has given the Asiana Boeing 777-200ER that crashed on Saturday July 6th at San Francisco International Airport, killing three and injuring over 100, a clean bill of health noting all systems including auto pilot, auto throttle and flight director were working perfectly.According to NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman investigators found “no anomalous behavior.”The NTSB also noted that the pilots were having trouble lining up for the landing on runway 28L. The airport’s Instrument Landing System, which gives an electronic guide to pilots, was not available but the visual Precision Approach Path Indicator was.The pilots were instructor check captain, Lee Jung Min (49) who was assisting captain Lee Kang Kook, (46) who was being endorsed on the 777. Both captains were experienced. A third pilot – a co-pilot – was sitting in the observer seat.According to the NTSB the 777’s speed decayed from a target speed of 137knots (253km/hour) to 103 knots (191km/hr) which went unnoticed till nine seconds before impact.“There is no mention of speed until about nine seconds before impact,” said Mrs Hersman.Captain Lee Jung Min earlier told the NTSB that he assumed that the auto throttle –similar to cruise control in a car – was maintaining the required speed of 137knots.However Mrs Hersman told media that “they [the pilots] are required to monitor their instruments during landing – particularly the speed.”Pilots work as team with one flying the plane the other supporting with read backs on critical data, setting flaps, lowering undercarriage and reading checklists.The instructor captain Lee Jung Min also told investigators that he saw three red and one light on the PAPI lights indicating too low and called for more power. Then he told investigators he could see four red lights and notice the airspeed was in the hatched area on the display– indicating too slow.Mrs Hersman said that two different members of the cockpit crew – the instructor captain and the observer co-pilot – made separate calls to abort the landing, three seconds and 1.5 seconds before the crash. Power was applied but it was too late.The pilot flying also reported being blinded by a flash of light on approach however the source of the light and its role in the crash are not known the NTSB said.Mrs Hersman also clarified the evacuation and noted that the cabin crew had sought guidance from the pilots but they initially, unaware of the fire, told flight attendants not to initiate evacuation procedures.Only when the flight attendants told them of the fire was the order given to evacuate.“We don’t know what the pilots were thinking, though I can tell you in previous accidents there have been crews that don’t evacuate, they wait for other vehicles to come to be able to get the passengers out safely,” said Mrs Hersman.However once the call was made the passengers were out within 90 seconds.last_img read more

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Dyer Island Trust teaches people to protect marine heritage

first_imgThe team at Dyer Island Conservation Trust knows that it takes a community to protect marine life and heritage; it is not a job for one organisation. The Western Cape group engages with local communities and tourists, teaching them about how to save our oceans and its creatures. Cleaning beaches is one way of saving the ocean, the Dyer Island Conservation Trust team regularly tells children and adults. It is one of the group’s educational programmes. (Images: Dyer Island Conservation Trust) Melissa Javan“It is critical that we protect our marine heritage for future generations,” said Pinkey Ngewu, the operations manager of Dyer Island Conservation Trust.She was speaking during National Marine Month, which began on 1 October in South Africa. It focuses on the National Development Plan‘s outcome to protect and enhance the country’s environmental assets and natural resources.The Dyer Island Conservation Trust, which is based in Van Dyks Bay on the southern coast of Western Cape, was established in 2006 to help the African penguin, whose numbers were at an all-time low. The trust now also focuses on rescuing other sea animals, as well as on teaching the local communities and tourists about marine life.The importance of educationTo get more people involved in protecting marine heritage, the trust runs several educational outreach programmes. These programmes – for children and adults – reach approximately 15 000 people annually.“Education is key to changing perceptions and social behaviour that ultimately affects the wildlife around us,” said Ngewu. “We are blessed with incredible marine wildlife that is under threat in so many ways, but we can change what we are doing and in time we will see the results of those efforts.” The Dyer Island Conservation Trust and its partners run several educational programmes that reach about 15 000 people a year.Ngewu said the trust and its partners, for example, work with schoolchildren in the area. “The trust supported an eco-schools co-ordinator in the Gansbaai-area for three years.”Gansbaai, neighbouring the trust’s homebase, is a fishing town and popular tourist destination. Known for its dense population of great white sharks, it is one of the world’s leading destinations for shark cage diving. It is also a well-known whale-watching location.“We also work with the Grootbos Football Foundation, which has a dedicated 12-week programme. Within this the trust does two lessons, one on the Marine Big Five and the other a practical beach clean-up. The beach clean-ups help in addressing the marine pollution issue and raising awareness by the practical output of this lesson,” said Ngewu.Watch the trust teach local youngsters about their environment, and in so doing restore pride in communities:About the trust Pinkey Ngewu is the newly appointed operations manager of the Dyer Island Conservation Trust.Working with eco-tourism partners Marine Dynamics Shark Tours and Dyer Island Cruises, the trust conducts valuable research, conservation and education.Marine Dynamics is a shark cage diving company that has been running since 2005; Dyer Island Cruises is a whale-watching company founded in 2001. The companies hold Fair Trade in Tourism certification and employ marine biologists whose research is, in turn, supported through the trust. The companies are essential in fundraising for the trust.Dyer Island is a 20ha nature reserve 8.5km from Kleinbaai harbour in Gansbaai. It is the easternmost of the chain of seabird islands of the Western Cape. Dyer Island is managed by CapeNature, and is primarily for seabirds and shore birds.The island is recognised as an important bird area (IBA), which gives Dyer Island the same status as an IBA anywhere else in the world. There are 1 228 IBAs in Africa, and 101 in South Africa. From a national bird conservation perspective, Dyer Island is one of the 100 most important sites in the country.The projects At the African Penguin Nesting Project, penguins readily adapt to over 2 000 nests.The Dyer Island Conservation Trust runs several projects:African Penguin Nesting Project: Heavily exploited penguin nesting sites are replaced with artificial nests. “During the mid-1800s and early 1900s, guano was harvested from the offshore islands and sold as fertiliser,” said Ngewu.“The penguins now struggle to burrow into the hard, rocky substrate on Dyer and other colonies, and have been forced to nest on the surface, leaving their eggs and chicks exposed to predation by kelp gulls, and other environmental influences,” she explained.“This nest project is in place in the majority of the colonies with the placement of over 2 000 nests. The penguins readily adapt to these nests and they have become essential in the fledgling success of this endangered species.”Seabird Rescue: “We deal with many injured, oiled or ill African penguins and others seabirds which are rehabilitated at our facility, the African Penguin and Seabird Sanctuary.”Great White Shark Research: “The Overstrand area has been established as a hotspot for the ocean’s most critical and threatened apex predator (the great white shark). We have produced the nation’s first population estimate and can greatly influence national and international protective measures.“Acoustic tagging and tracking and years of boat-based observational data have helped build a better understanding of great white shark behaviour with crucial scientific papers published,” said Ngewu. “Our studies have also helped in the understanding of predatory interactions and new insights into their behaviour are being revealed.”Fishing Line Disposal Bin Project: Through correct disposal, this project aims to reduce the severe environmental damage to animals caused by entanglement in fishing line that has been discarded along the coastline. Monofilament fishing line, line used for shore-based and small boat-based angling, is one of the major causes of marine life mortality.Marine Animal Strandings: This may include whales, whale sharks, dolphins, sea turtles and seals. “We own a fully equipped boat for whale disentanglement, as well as a specially developed rescue floatation cradle, and have specially trained staff to handle any disentanglement that might arise,” said Ngewu.Watch what the trust does on a typical day:Besides learning about the ocean and marine life, find out 10 ways of saving the ocean here.last_img read more

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Alberta RCMP on lookout for suspect in death of woman on Bigstone

first_imgChris StewartAPTN National NewsRCMP in Alberta is asking for the public’s help in the search for Dwayne Beauregard, 20, who is a suspect in the death of Joelle Cardinal, 21.According to the police, an incident was witnessed by a number of people Monday morning at a residence in Bigstone Cree Nation, 325 km north of Edmonton.Police say Beauregard is 5’10 and 170 lbs. He has a tattoo on his left forearm that says “Arissa Love,” and a cross on his right forearm.Police are advising people not to confront him but instead to dial 911.Contact Chris here: cstewart@aptn.calast_img read more

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Trudeau Horgan under fire for downplaying Aboriginal title following RCMP raid of

first_imgPrime Minister Justin Trudeau was criticized Wednesday in Kamloops for the RCMP’s raid of a check point and camp on unceded Wet’suwet’en territory earlier this week.Justin BrakeAPTN NewsB.C. Premier John Horgan and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau both broke their silence Wednesday on a pipeline company’s injunction against members of the Unist’ot’en House and Gidimt’en Clan, and the RCMP’s raid Monday on unceded Wet’sewet’en territory.But observers say the leaders were misleading, or skirted fundamental questions related to Indigenous jurisdiction and title at the heart of the conflict around the LNG project in northern B.C.On Wednesday Horgan said he has met with and respects hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en Nation, but that the company responsible for the pipeline “has met the obligations that we asked them to achieve.”He also suggested free, prior and informed consent did not mean First Nations could have a veto on resource development projects.Horgan cited a comment he said Kwikwasut’inuxw Haxwa’mis First Nation Chief Bob Chamberlin “categorically and unreservedly” made during recent negotiations between the government and Indigenous leadership over fish farms in B.C., “that the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples does not mean a veto.“It means we need to sit down and find a way forward on consent,” Horgan said.In a written statement Thursday, Chamberlin, who is also vice-president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs (UBCIC), and Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the UBCIC rejected Horgan’s comments.They said there’s an “extremely important distinction” between the situation in Wet’suwet’en territory and the recent announced closure of fish farms in the Broughton Archipelago, where government and First Nations worked together in a “jointly developed consent-based process where our Title and Rights were recognized,” they write.The chiefs say they are “confident that we would not have reached a point of RCMP action at Gidimt’en if a jointly designed, consent-based process had been in place.”Phillip also said they “reject the racist notion of veto perpetuated by industry and government, which falsely implies that Indigenous Peoples demand a unilateral final say on decisions that impact them.“Since colonization, we have had to deal with the Crown having a veto over almost every aspect of our lives, and in the case of the Unist’ot’en, we just watched what their veto over the peacefully protesting Wet’suwet’en land defenders looked like.”Horgan wasn’t the only leader under fire after publicly addressing Monday’s raid of the Gidimt’en Clan’s camp, established a few weeks ago to protect their part of Wet’suwet’en territory.At a town hall event in Kamloops Wednesday evening, Arnie Jack of the Secwepemc Nation pressed Trudeau on the Trans Mountain pipeline and asked the prime minister for evidence the Secwepemc ceded or surrendered their lands to the Crown.“Canada does not have a deed to Shuswap territory, you do not have a deed to Secwepemcul’ecw,” he said, adding Canada does “not have the consent of our Shuswap Nation Elder’s Council to put a pipeline through our territory.”Jack told Trudeau agreements with leadership whose authority was established under Canada’s Indian Act does not equate to consent from the Nation.“You can stand up all of the elected chiefs that you want and say that you have consent, but you do not have consent from the people on the ground,” he said.“What you did to the Unist’ot’en — that’s a national disgrace,” Arnie Jack of the Secwepemc Nation told Trudeau Wednesday in Kamloops. APTN photo.When Jack told Trudeau he “may have bought a few INAC chiefs but you don’t own us all,” the prime minister’s response resembled something he said to a Secwepemc leader last month at an Assembly of First Nations special chiefs’ assembly in Ottawa.On Dec. 5 Neskonlith Indian Band Chief Judy Wilson told Trudeau that on the issue of Trans Mountain Canada does not have the consent of the proper title and rights holders of the Secwepemc Nation, who she said are the collective people and not elected Indian Act chiefs like herself.After hearing Trudeau’s remarks to Jack Wednesday evening, Wilson said she believes the prime minister is “dividing” the people of her Nation, “and being selective” in who his government deals with.“He’s trying to say the Indian Act chiefs and councils have the authority and jurisdiction for the territory, which they don’t,” Wilson told APTN News.“When [bands] sign impacts and benefit agreements or agreements with the government their jurisdiction is only over the one percent of reserve lands,” she said. “Collectively the proper title holders hold the 99 percent of the territory” of the Secwepemc Nation’s 180,000 square kilometres.”Jack told Trudeau Wednesday night in Kamloops he wants the “RCMP out of Unist’ot’en territory.”Thousands of Indigenous people and allies across Canada sent messages of support to Unist’ot’en on Tuesday, many of them also ordering the federal police out of the unceded territory.Peter Grant, a lawyer representing the Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, told APTN Thursday that the 1997 Supreme Court of Canada (SCC) Delgamuukw decision acknowledged that the Wet’suwet’en House chiefs “represented their House groups and collectively their Nation.”He said this is where the RCMP got it wrong in a statement they posted to their website before enforcing the injunction, and then later retracted.In an unusual move, the RCMP publicly interpreted Aboriginal case law to justify removing Indigenous people from their lands.They said last Sunday that because the SCC ordered a retrial, and since that retrial has not happened, “Aboriginal title to this land, and which Indigenous nation holds it, has not been determined.”Grant said the RCMP were “right to retract their statement,” adding “it’s not that title doesn’t exist pre-declaration, it’s that the government is refusing to recognize title before a court declaration.“The law is clear,” he said, “Aboriginal title, if it’s there, is there throughout.”In Kamloops, Jack issued a stern warning to Trudeau, saying if the government tries to force the Trans Mountain pipeline through Secwepemc territory his people are “prepared to meet you on the ground this summer anywhere you want,” alluding to the month-long Gustafson Lake standoff in 1995.“We’re serious. We’re not playing around,” he continued. “What you did to the Unist’ot’en — that’s a national disgrace. Jan. 7 was a national disgrace [for] Canada.”jbrake@aptn.ca@JustinBrakeNewslast_img read more

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