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H View hold advantage in race for fourth spot

first_imgFormer champions Harbour View will go into today’s set of matches in the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) with the advantage as the battle for the fourth place continues. The stars of the East, as Harbour View are dubbed, currently occupy the fourth spot on 39 points, the same as UWI FC, but with a superior goal difference. What gives them the edge today is the match-up. While Harbour View will play away to the inconsistent Boys Town, UWI FC will host defending champions and the team occupying second spot, Arnett Gardens. Of the opposing teams, Boys’ Town are the easier of the two while only a brave person would bet against Arnett Gardens defeating UWI FC. Arnett Gardens are filled with ammunition and with the likes of the in-form Michaelous Martin, their leading scorer Kemal Malcolm, Leon Strickland and Newton Sterling. Any of those forwards can provide the goods on the day. With UWI FC’s slow defensive unit and Deno Schaffe being out, it will take a major effort to keep Arnett Gardens off the score sheet. UWI FC are also capable of finding the back of the net through Girvon Brown, Anthony, Grant, Anthony Greenland and Kemar Cummings. Since his return to the island from the USA, Brian Brown has been in good goal-scoring form and is expected to lead the Harbour View attack against Boys’ Town. P W D L GF GA GD Pts MoBay U 29 15 11 3 47 17 30 56 Arnett 29 16 6 7 44 22 22 54 Portmore 29 16 6 7 36 24 12 54 H View 29 9 12 8 34 29 5 39 UWI 29 10 9 10 33 39 -6 39 H Lion 29 9 11 9 23 27 -4 38 Boys’ T 29 9 8 12 33 44 -11 35 Tivoli 29 9 6 14 31 37 -6 33 Cavalier 29 8 9 12 23 29 -6 33 Reno 29 7 11 11 28 45 -17 32 W’house 29 6 10 13 26 35 -9 28 Rivoli 29 6 9 14 31 41 -11 27 Today’s Games – 8:40 p.m.: Montego Bay United vs Portmore United – Montego Bay Sports Complex POINTS STANDING Tomorrow’s game: – 3:30 p.m.: Boys’ Town vs Harbour View – Barbican Stadium – 3:30 p.m.: Reno vs Tivoli Gardens – Frome Complex – 3:30 p.m.: Humble Lion vs Waterhouse – Effortville Community Centre – 3:30 p.m.: Rivoli United FC vs Cavalier – Prison Oval – 3:30 p.m.: UWI FC vs Arnett Gardens – UWI Bowl, Monalast_img read more

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New law to promote savings

first_img8 June 2007Finance Minister Trevor Manuel has introduced the new Taxation Laws Amendment Bill, which aims to help South Africans manage their savings in an environment of rising personal debt.Manuel told Parliament in Cape Town this week that personal income tax relief would be granted to the public across the board as a result of the “steadily growing economy and administrative efficiencies of the South African Revenue Service”.The tax-free threshold for low-income earners is set to be raised from R40 000 to R43 000, the minister said, while the 18% tax bracket would be raised from R100 000 to R112 500, and the 40% tax bracket from 400 000 to 450 000.Manuel said the raising of thresholds for taxable earnings would effectively put R8.8-billion worth of personal income back into the pockets of taxpayers.“Long-term savings for pension, provident funds and individual retirement annuities can now grow tax-free so as to maximise the savings ‘nest egg’ of future retirees,” Manuel said, noting that the most notable changes to the Bill have been in the area of savings.Another related amendment to the Bill is a new tax regime for lump sum payouts on retirement or death. Under the draft law:The first R300 000 lump sum amount will be tax-free.Amounts between R300 000 to R600 000 will be subject to 18% tax.Amounts between R600 000 to R900 000 will be subject to 27% tax.All amounts above R900 000 will be subject to 36% tax.Manuel said interest and dividend exemption for individuals aged below 65 would increase from R16 500 to R18 000, and for older individuals would increase from R24 500 to R26 000.He added that the exemption for capital gains and losses would increase from R12 500 to R15 000. Tax exemption on donations would also increase from R50 000 to R100 000.In the interest of making sure that individuals “have sufficient funds upon retirement or to pass onto future generations,” estate duty exemption would increase from R2.5-million to R3.5-million.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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More Proof: Facebook for the Rich, MySpace for the Poor

first_imgOh how the mighty have fallen. The one time king of social networks, MySpace, now has the honor of being the site where the less affluent members of the online population stake their claims by way of bedazzled profiles overrun with auto-playing videos and songs. Meanwhile, the upscale, financially solvent users have moved on – and by moved on, we mean to Facebook, of course. At least those are the findings of the latest social networking study done by American consumer behavior analysis firm Nielsen Claritas. By no means is this the first time that the demographics of today’s social networks have been scrutinized and analyzed by researchers, nor is it the first time that they’ve come to this same conclusion. Earlier this summer, for example, Anderson Analytics looked into this same topic, studying trends among social networking users on Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, and LinkedIn. They found that Facebook users tend to be better off financially, while MySpace users’ income was the lowest out of the four networks studied.Those claims are now being further backed up by the Nielsen study, which, in addition to noting the financial discrepancies, also discovered that many social networking users tend to be urbanites, especially those engaged in blogging and tweeting. The study examined seven of the most popular social networking and blogging sites including Facebook, MySpace, Blogger, Twitter, WordPress, ClassmatesOnline, and LinkedIn. Through the Claritas product, Nielsen segments their online panel of 200,000+ participants into demographically and behaviorally distinct groups which include everything from “Young Digerati” to “Heartlanders.” After doing so, they found a notable difference between the two top social networking sites, Facebook and MySpace.According to the research, the top third of lifestyle segments relative to affluence (aka the “richest” users) are 25% more likely to use Facebook than those in the lower third. The bottom third segments related to affluence (aka the “poorest”) are 37% more likely to use MySpace. Also of note, Facebook users are more likely to use LinkedIn, a site for professional business networking, and again, another factor which points towards the differences in demographics between the two social networks. Besides confirming the income discrepancies between MySpace and Facebook, Nielsen also discovered that those involved in blogging and tweeting tend to live in more urban areas such as New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Chicago. The 12 “Urban” lifestyle groups tracked by the company are more likely to use Blogger, WordPress, and Twitter than the 22 “Town and Rural” segments. However, there was no mention of these groups being more affluent, just more urban. Tags:#Facebook#news#NYT#social networks#Trends#web Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification sarah perez A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditcenter_img The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Related Posts Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro…last_img read more

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What Are The Feds Hiding? Let’s Ask The Declassification Engine

first_imgHow to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Each year, the U.S. government declassifies thousands of documents and releases them to the public through collections like the Declassified Document Reference System (DDRS) and the CIA’s FOIA Reading Room. Some, however, contain “redacted” information that’s too sensitive to be released — leaving, for instance, key details of an FBI memo blacked out for the average reader.Enter the Declassification Engine, which aims to harness Big Data analysis and some old-fashioned crowdsourcing to peer through the “black bars” of redacted documents and reveal what the government doesn’t want you to know. Using publicly available, declassified documents as its sources, the Declassification Engine aims to eventually make informed guesses about what those black bars are hiding, providing a “word cloud” of likely possibilities. Is that blacked out word “Aurora,” for example, potentially referring to new types of advanced aircraft? And, if so, does that imply that similar redacted memos refer to the same key words? A Tool For Historians And The PublicThe Declassification Engine could be an instrument for historians and conspiracy theorists alike. For now, though, it’s basically just a set of data-analysis tools developed by researchers at Columbia University.One finds correlations between specific words and often-classified memos, for example. Another was designed to help train the system to pick up on differences between redacted documents, and what was revealed years later when the government declassified them for public eyes. Eventually, they’ll form a more cohesive whole, the Engine’s creators say.To take the next steps, the Engine’s founders are asking for help. Last week, historians, journalists, legal scholars, statisticians, and computer scientists met at Columbia University to formally launch the Engine — and to ask for money. The Declassification Engine hopes to raise $50,000 to fund the project, and its founders have only raised a few hundred dollars at present.Matthew Connelly, a historian at Columbia and one of the creators of the Declassification Engine, explained that the group is consciously trying to put the Declassification Engine on the “white hat” side of the fence — the opposite side, in other words, from organizations like Wikileaks.The Engine’s source material consists of documents that have already been declassified and released by the government for public scrutiny. Furthermore, its users aren’t “cracking” redactions; they’re simply making guesses. What they hope are good guesses, but guesses nevertheless.How The Engine Revved UpDeclassification straddles a long-standing fault line in American politics, as Marc Trachtenberg, a professor of political science at UCLA explains:There is thus a built-in conflict between the consumer and the supplier of historical evidence: we historians want to see the ‘dirt,’ but those responsible for the release of documents want to make sure that the material released does not damage the political interests they are responsible for protecting.A redacted memo, made public by the Freedom of Information Act. (Source: http://www.foia.cia.gov/)Declassified documents are often a tool to better understand our own history. But getting at that understanding sometimes requires teasing out decades-old data.One of the first things the team did last year was to analyze which keywords were most closely associated with federal decisions to withhold documents among 1.4 million State Department cables. They then created a tool to analyze diplomatic activity over time depending on which terms were used, and the likelihood that a cable that included a specific term would still be classified.That analysis revealed that 1970s cables that contained the word “Boulder” or phrase “Operation Boulder” were much, much more likely to be withheld, Connelly said. As it turned out, Project Boulder was President Nixon’s plan, hatched following the hostage crisis at the Munich Olympics, to increase FBI scrutiny of Arabs entering the United States. In other words, 1970s-style ethnic profiling.In this case, Connelly said, the archive of scanned documents could have served as a historical context when people began discussing the treatment of Arab-Americans thirty years later, after Sept. 11. But without the digital archive of source documents, that context wasn’t readily available.“The reason that these historians have never even heard of it is because the vast majority of the documents have been withheld, in the archives,” Connelly said. “Without those documents, we can’t even begin to try and derive some of these lessons.”The government originally held back the majority of memos that contained the word “Boulder”. (Source: Matthew Connelly)Is It Legal?Given the political climate surrounding security in the decade-plus since September 11, the Declassification Engine’s creators said last week that they were somewhat nervous that the U.S. government might try to clamp down on it. (The creators, naturally, believe that it’s perfectly legal.) Connelly, however, said that the discussion during Friday’s conference gave him reason to believe that the Engine’s creators aren’t likely to face any investigation from law enforcement agencies. Nevertheless, on Friday, the FAQ portion of the site was modified to eliminate all references to the project’s legality, including that the group sought input from the State Department and the National Archives to better understand the declassification process.“In some cases, we are using statistical methods to predict what is still classified,” the Declassification Engine’s FAQ said Thursday night.How The Tools WorkConnelly gave ReadWrite an early glimpse of one component of the Engine on Thursday night. That’s the Redaction Visualizer, which compares redacted and unredacted documents and highlights the differences. On the surface, this seems pretty obvious. Comparing an unredacted and redacted memo. (Source: Declassification-engine.org)But the Visualizer is also the basic equivalent of your math homework: the redacted document provides the problem to solve, and the unredacted document is the “answer”. This supervised data will  “teach the computer to teach itself about what’s in the redaction,” Connelly said.The text that the Redaction Visualizer pulls out. (Source: Declassification-engine.org)The real work for the Engine, though, lies in deciphering the redactions themselves. And the biggest arrow in its quiver is context. In total, the Engine uses 117,509 documents from the DDRS, with the most from the Eisenhower and Johnson administrations.The text of the documents themselves are just one part of the puzzle. But there’s a surprising amount  of unredacted metadata attached to each as well: the date, the author, the subject, who classified it, when it was declassified — 68 fields in all, Connelly said. All can be used as clues to make guesses as to what the redacted content contains. Connelly admits that he’s not even clear on how well the Engine could work, once it’s up and running.What the Declassification Engine hopes to do for each redaction is generate a “word cloud” of the words that are statistically likely to be hidden by the redaction. Granted, this is a lot easier to do with a short series of letters, such as a name or date. Still, any guesses could be used to tease out further possibilities, and cross-correlated with other, similar documents to make further guesses.Eventually, the Declassification Engine could become a Web site, where users could upload their own declassified documents, run them against the tools, and also add their own insights. “It would create a virtuous circle, and [users] would be able to make more and more powerful and accurate predictions,” Connelly said.Obama Turbocharges The EngineThe Declassification Engine received an unexpected boon from the Obama Administration on the eve of its launch: an executive order making machine-readable government documents the law of the land.“Government information shall be managed as an asset throughout its life cycle to promote interoperability and openness, and, wherever possible and legally permissible, to ensure that data are released to the public in ways that make the data easy to find, accessible, and usable,” President Obama wrote. “In making this the new default state, executive departments and agencies shall ensure that they safeguard individual privacy, confidentiality, and national security.”The order could remove the need to optically scan some government documents, allowing the Engine to more quickly process bunches of files. It remains to be seen how executive agencies will protect their electronic documents, however. But, as Connelly noted, the order begs the question: if machines are now allowed to read government documents, shouldn’t they be allowed to guess what they’re hiding? markhachman Tags:#Big Data center_img Related Posts Why You Love Online Quizzes Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoidlast_img read more

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Tips for Android Developers to Succeed in Google Play Store

first_imgRoma Kapadiya Follow the Puck Tags:#Android developers#Google Play Trends Driving the Loyalty Marketing Industry Related Posts Everybody in the market is looking for an app with desired success and avoid failure at any cost. Therefore, the web is full of advice and tips to achieve mobile app success, and Android app category is no exception at all.However, Google Play Store is officially releasing and updating various guidelines to achieve app success quickly and legitimately that runs for long. If Android developers follow those design and development guidelines during the development, deployment, and marketing phases of app lifecycle, it may ease the life and prove cost-effective.Therefore, I have discussed some useful outlines for app success in Google Play store in following ways.Best Practices to Develop Android AppsIt consists of some decent tips, such as:Focusing on UX for Different Form FactorsMaterial Design an Excellent ConceptDesign PrinciplesBest Practices for System UI ComponentsUI Elements and Patternscenter_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Roma Kapadia is an SEO & Research Analyst at SysBunny, an prominent mobile app development company based in the USA. She has a very detailed knowledge of the mobile app industry. Best Practices to Deploy Your Android App on Play StoreAfter development, you have to submit an app to Play Store and publish it once you get approval. For successful deployment, some good hints are available, such as:Distribution TipsTesting TipsTips to create a compelling listBest Practices to Bring Engagement in Your Android AppAfter public release, some app engagement tactics are essential to bring and keep users on your app. In due course, good tips are:Encourage Repeat Usage of AppIntegrate Features for More EngagementInteract with Targeted AudienceBring Engagement Across DevicesBest Practices to Grow Your Android App & Expand BusinessIf you want to grow further in the market and expand your reach, following tips are best ways:Bring more traffic to your listing in Play StoreUnderstand the needs of your targeted audienceRespond to user feedbacksBest Practices to Monetize Your Android AppFirst, create right monetization strategy by leveraging Play Billing, Android Pay, and AdMob ads. The second is increasing number of users who are paying.If you wish to know more details, I would like to refer my recent blog on the same “Tips for Android Developers to Secure App Success on Google Play” to get details and come in contact with Android app development team at SysBunny. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …last_img read more

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