iucqrcpk

Iuliano to lead Gettysburg College

first_imgRobert W. Iuliano, Harvard’s senior vice president, general counsel, and deputy to the president, has been selected as Gettysburg College’s 15th president, the school announced Wednesday.Iuliano ’83, who returned to Harvard in 1994 and has served five presidents, played a vital role in issues ranging from the legal challenge to diversity in the College admissions process to the return of ROTC to campus, the advent of online education, and inclusion and belonging efforts.“Bob Iuliano is one of the most talented leaders with whom I have ever been privileged to work,” said Harvard President Larry Bacow. “He cares deeply about students and undergraduate education. He is a gifted teacher and a fabulous leader. He also is incredibly decent, principled, and humble. Gettysburg has chosen well.“Bob has contributed immeasurably to Harvard during his 25-year career here,” Bacow added. “I have come to rely on Bob’s sage advice during my tenure as both a member of the Corporation and now as president. He is not only a great lawyer; he has become a great friend. I, and all of Harvard, will miss him.”Among Iuliano’s key contributions is his oversight of the University’s legal strategy, most recently in his leadership of Harvard’s response to the lawsuit challenging the College’s consideration of race in admissions.He was instrumental in bringing back formal recognition of ROTC on campus after a decades-long absence, negotiating agreements with the Army, Navy, and Air Force after the repeal of the federal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy on sexuality in 2011. He similarly played a formative role in the 2010 review of Harvard’s governing boards, which resulted in the most significant structural changes there since its founding in the middle of the 17th century. Iuliano also assisted the search committee for Harvard’s 28th and 29th presidents.He has overseen the University Police Department and has managed a number of University initiatives and committees, including efforts to strengthen Title IX regulations as well as the Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging.In 2012, Iuliano partnered with the provost and other academic leaders to help launch edX, Harvard’s transformational online learning partnership with MIT, which grew to support more than 1.6 million registrants in 195 countries only two years after launching. Since then, he has led a review of the University’s relationships and responsibilities with nontraditional and nondegree learners, including its online students.Drew Faust, Harvard president emerita and Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor, lauded Iuliano’s commitment to higher education and to Harvard, saying his “wisdom, humaneness, and dedication to the mission of higher education have strengthened Harvard over more than two decades. Congratulations to Gettysburg College for its brilliant selection of this remarkable leader and wonderful human being.”,After Harvard College, Iuliano graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law, where he was editor in chief of the Virginia Law Review. After clerking for Judge Levin H. Campbell of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit, he was an associate at the Boston law firm Choate, Hall & Stewart. He served as a federal prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney’s office in Boston before joining Harvard’s Office of the General Counsel in 1994. He has taught courses on higher education and the law as well as contemporary issues in higher education at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education and at the College.“Nearly 40 years ago, I walked through the gates of Harvard Yard as an 18-year old student, uncertain of who I was and what I wanted from my life,” said Iuliano. “As I leave now, for the second time, I am reminded of how indelibly Harvard has shaped me and how grateful I am to the University. It has been a privilege to have served this remarkable institution for the past 25 years. The work has mattered enormously to me, and I have found deep satisfaction in partnering with the faculty, students, and staff who make Harvard what it is and in helping to advance Harvard’s research and educational mission.”Iuliano will become Gettysburg’s president on July 1. His unanimous selection by the college’s board of trustees followed a global search for a successor to Janet Morgan Riggs, who last May announced her intention to retire at the end of June.“At Harvard, Bob has been involved in key decisions the University has made about strategy, policy, and student life. This wide variety of experience at such a remarkable institution, coupled with his passion for teaching and the liberal arts, translates into the type of leader we need at Gettysburg College,” said David Brennan, chair of the college’s trustees. “Bob is insightful, thoughtful, knowledgeable, and inquisitive, and is well-equipped to move Gettysburg College forward.”“Like Harvard, Gettysburg is infused by its history but has a restless ambition as it looks to its future,” said Iuliano. “I am excited for the opportunity to have a role in shaping that future and ensuring that Gettysburg continues to afford its students an unparalleled educational experience. I leave Harvard to join a community that truly inspires me. I am honored beyond words by the invitation to serve as Gettysburg College’s 15th president. I look forward to taking all I have learned at Harvard and to helping the faculty, students, and staff, in the words of Gettysburg’s motto, to ‘do great work.’”President Bacow will initiate a search for Iuliano’s replacement in the coming weeks.last_img read more

Read More

LabXchange meets and beats challenges of remote learning

first_imgThe LabXchange opened to virtual fanfare when it launched this past January, but the excitement was brief. The introduction of the program, created to help STEM teachers bridge ethnic and gender gaps as effectively as possibly, was quickly lost in the explosion of COVID-19.But that doesn’t mean it went away. Despite the pressing pandemic and political news, the website has had more than 2 million users since its debut — and to its creators, it’s clear why.The initiative, developed by Harvard University’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the Amgen Foundation, and Massachusetts teachers, is a free resource for students and educators to collaborate in an online community as well as use mentors to help address equity and access in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). LabXchange is accessible from anywhere in the world, offers a library of diverse content, includes a biotechnology learning resource available in 12 different languages, and applies science to real-world issues.Robert Lue, faculty director and principal investigator of LabXchange, identified the need for flexible online learning tools that educators and employers at all levels can control to create customized learning plans.“LabXchange is especially pleased to have launched at a time when we could add our STEM resources and online class functionalities to the arsenal that instructors have to teach virtually during the pandemic,” he said.,Last week, in partnership with Massachusetts STEM Week, the initiative hosted “Personalize Online Learning with LabXchange,” a virtual event for local teachers. Participants learned how to use the platform as a tool that encourages exploration, adaptation, teamwork, experimentation, and creativity through critical thinking, problem-solving, and innovation. They also learned ways to help their students learn to build and sustain a global economy, and increase the roles of women and minorities.LabXchange chief of staff Ilyana Sawka said the initiative is working to break down barriers and stereotypes in science and democratize participation in digital learning. The platform gives people an easy way to jump in and experiment, she said.“There is room for improvement with diversity in the STEM sector, and we want to be part of the conversation about how we can improve outcomes for young people,” she said.This year’s statewide educational theme, “See Yourself in STEM,” was stressed by webinar host Jessica Silverman, LabXchange content and collaborations manager; and participants David Mangus, Brockton High School science department head; Mary Liu, Weston High School biology teacher; Andrew Bowersox, Greenfield High School science teacher; and Alia Qatarneh, Massachusetts Amgen Biotech experience program director at Harvard University. “The pandemic is changing how we do things. We are trying to create a new understanding and new definition of what it means to pursue science in a rapidly changing society.” — Ilyana Sawka, LabXchange chief of staff A science club for girls This is what a scientist looks like Mahlet Shiferaw loved astronomy and physics, but had to overcome feeling like an outsider in fields that draw few women and fewer African Americans Making a place for herself During the event, Mangus, a former research scientist, demonstrated a molecular biology simulation using virtual lab components to mimic a robust in-person lab.“This provides them low-stakes, low-impact environments where they can explore without having to worry about making mistakes or wasting resources,” he said.Silverman works with scientists and artists to help create interchangeable modular content that stimulates interactive learning to meet specific learning objectives. Interesting graphics, text, and video help learners navigate challenging topics.“It’s not just a linear track, we want to show what experiences are common to all students, and what pathways are available to students for their individual interests and at their own pace,” she said.Sawka said LabXchange shares the Amgen Foundation’s mission of trying to ensure science is informed by a multitude of perspectives promoting success on a career path — whether in medicine, research, policy, communications, or biotech business development. “The pandemic is changing how we do things,” she said. “We are trying to create a new understanding and new definition of what it means to pursue science in a rapidly changing society.”center_img Harvard students, alumnae work to inspire next generation of diverse female scientists Project aims to give young students real-life STEM role models Related LabXchange has been working to support schools across Massachusetts as they transition to, and continue with, remote and hybrid learning. Over the past few months more than 16,000 educators and students have used the platform, for nearly 10,000 hours of teaching and learning. More than 90 Massachusetts schools and institutions, and more than 50 educator co-developers have collaborated on the platform thus far.Massachusetts Secretary of Education James Peyser, who made opening remarks at the LabXchange event, said the pandemic has substantially impacted education and brought longstanding equity barriers into starker relief. He praised the positive developments that have come to light providing energy and momentum for educators and students, especially the trend toward digital simulations and other virtual learning experiences such as LabXchange.“They are not just a substitute for traditional instruction, they can actually improve the depth of learning while breaking down barriers that may otherwise prevent students and teachers from getting access to the most effective learning experiences,” he said. “Especially in underserved communities and especially in STEM fields.”last_img read more

Read More

SMC departments promote sustainability, justice

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s departments of education and art will host a Sustainable Arts Cafe and Market in Dalloway’s Clubhouse on Friday.Bri O’Brien, co-chair of the Justice Education Student Advisory Committee (JSAC), said the cafe highlights the justice-oriented work of students and faculty on campus and benefits Northern Indiana by raising funds to combat hunger. “Students can show their support for the awesome work of other students and faculty members through participating in the event,” O’Brien said. “Students can eat, shop, hang out and learn about sustainability while supporting the Saint Mary’s and Northern Indiana communities.”Director of Justice Education Adrienne Lyles-Chockley said the event will help bring together the campus community, local organizations and individuals who are committed to food justice. She said students from across disciplines will come together to address poverty in the wider community by raising funds for the local food bank.“Poverty and food insecurity are issues that affect everyone,” Lyles-Chockley said. “Here, people can address it while doing something they likely would do anyway: shop for holiday gifts.”Lyles-Chockley said the event will feature spoken word by Poetic Melody and a poetry reading by English professor Aaron Moe. O’Brien said students in the Sustainable Textiles course will display and sell the sustainable artwork they have created over this past semester. She said this would include eco-dyed scarves, journals and notebooks made from recycled cotton and denim, upcycled fabric handbags and essential oils.O’Brien said there will also be coffee made from Fair Trade coffee beans, as well as a variety of local, organic foods available from vendors from the South Bend Farmers’ Market, which students can try free of charge. Students will have the opportunity to speak with Krista Bailey from the South Bend Office for Sustainability during this event, she said. Lyles-Chockley said this event shows students that justice can be encountered in works of art and in consumption choices.“Justice isn’t just encountered in lectures,” Lyles-Chockley said. “[The event] fulfills the Justice Education mission by getting students to think about the ways in which they can make small changes to create a more sustainable lifestyle, by introducing students to products that are justly made and to individuals who have committed themselves to making peaceful and just decisions in their consumer and production choices, and by introducing students to thinking about justice in an interdisciplinary way.”JSAC member Morgan Matthews said she encourages students to attend the cafe because the products being sold are ones that people use daily.“It’s not just using organic, sustainable products,” Matthews said. “You’re also helping the South Bend area because these people are trying to sell their products on the daily, and this would help business for them as well. Tags: JSAC, Justice Education, sustainabilitylast_img read more

Read More

Kellogg faculty fellow, Robert Pelton, dies at 98

first_imgFr. Robert S. Pelton, who was a faculty fellow in the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, died Monday, the University announced in a press release Tuesday. He was 98 years old.Pelton studied liberation theology with an emphasis in Latin American countries. He served as the founder and director of the Kellogg Institute’s Latin American/North American Church Concerns (LANACC).Peter Casarella, associate professor of theology at Notre Dame and former director of LANACC, said in the release that Pelton possessed a strong sense of dedication to Notre Dame.“His record of service sheds a lot of light on the genesis of almost all the ecclesial institutes we have around us today,” Casarella said. “From its inception, Fr. Bob dedicated LANACC to ‘reverse mission.’ He believed that gringos such as himself had more to learn from Latin America than Latin Americans were going to learn from him.”Pelton studied the Salvadorian archbishop Oscar Romero extensively, and his research was used in a number of publications including Zenit, the New York Times and The Guardian. In 2018, Pelton took a trip to Rome to witness the bishop’s canonization ceremony in St. Peter’s Square, the report said.Pelton was ordained as a Holy Cross priest in 1949 and received his licentiate and doctorate in sacred theology from St. Thomas University in Rome, the report said.Recognized as a filmmaker, scholar, author, theology professor and globetrotter, Pelton received an honorary doctorate from the University of Portland in 2016. He was also honored for serving as a theological advisor to Cardinal Leo Sunenens during the Second Vatican Council in 1965, and for his coverage of St. Pope John Paul II visits to Latin America as a journalist.Having an interest in the house churches in Cuba, Pelton took five trips to Cuba.“The related Notre Dame course, “Between God and the Party,” was taught by Fr. Pelton and Casarella and provided students the opportunity to talk with Cuban youth and learn about U.S. – Cuban relationships and the global expanse of the Catholic Church,” the press release said.In 2016, University President Emeritus Fr. “Monk” Malloy praised Pelton’s service in Chile in the 1960s and 1970s.“The role Bob played in the Catholic Church in Chile during a very important period of that country’s history was equivalent to that of an acting bishop,” Malloy said. “He has been a global citizen, a manifestation of the Church international and a true advocate of the vision of Vatican II.”At an earlier time, Pelton said he believed the Holy Spirit at the Council impacted his view of the Church, the release said.“It began to seem to me much more important to understand and experience what was going on at the grassroots of the church, and I felt myself more and more drawn in that direction,” Pelton said.In 2018, Pelton spoke out regarding the clerical sex abuse crisis, recognizing the damage it has caused and praying for Pope Francis to promote Romero as a pastoral model for the Church.“This moment provides a unique opportunity for the Church’s official leaders to accept a clear call from the Gospels, together with the affirmation of a committed lay leadership,” Pelton said.A vigil service will be held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Moreau Seminary Chapel. A funeral Mass for Fr. Pelton will be held at 3:30 p.m. Friday in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart.Tags: Latin American, Moreau Seminary, the Basilica of the Sacred Heartlast_img read more

Read More

Hog Payments Little Help

first_imgDon’t expect the recently announced federal payments to small pork producers to help Georgia farmers much, says a University of Georgia economist. On Jan. 12, Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman outlined ways the U.S. Department of Agriculture will help struggling small pork producers. But the farm size limits that restrict the payments will likely cut out many Georgia family farms. “It’s hard to say exactly how many dollars would go to Georgia,” said John McKissick, an Extension Service agricultural economist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “We have a number of producers in that category. But they don’t have a large number of hogs. And many of them have gone out of business,” McKissick said. “So the payments will help some. But they will leave out a lot of family farms that are over the size limit.” The restrictions could hit hard on Georgia’s already suffering hog business. “The pork business in the state is suffering,” McKissick said. “This latest tragedy is that the producers are facing the lowest prices since the 1930s. Minus inflation, they’re actually the lowest prices this century. “In Georgia, we lost our last packer two and a half years ago,” he said. “So we get even less than the national price for our hogs, because we don’t have the buying power of our competition.” As a result of those factors, Georgia’s hog numbers steadily dropped since the 1980s. “Right now we have roughly one-fifth of the hogs we had in 1980,” McKissick said, “and roughly one-fourth of what we had as late as 1990.” The last Hog and Pig Report by the USDA Agricultural Statistics Service shows that as many as 290 Georgia farms can qualify for these payments. “Operations under 2,000 head had only 30 percent of the production in the state last year,” McKissick said. “The numbers may sound big. But the amount per producer would be relatively small. “You miss many of our real commercial producers who depend on pork for their income but are still family farms, not the large operations,” he said. “But they won’t be eligible for any of this help.” Eligible farmers will get up to $5 per slaughter-weight hog (or the equivalent for feeder pigs and other swine) marketed during the last six months of 1998. Farmers will be paid only on up to 500 market hogs (or an equivalent number of feeder pigs). The maximum payment will be $2,500 per operation. No payments will be made to farms whose 1998 gross income was over $2.5 million, as is true for USDA’s crop disaster assistance programs. Glickman said farmers are eligible if they sold fewer than 1,000 hogs during the last six months of ’98 and are still in operation today. They’re not eligible for payments on hogs marketed under fixed-price or cost-plus contracts. Farmers should apply for direct payments at their local Farm Service Agency office from Feb. 1 to Feb. 12. Payments will be made around the end of February.last_img read more

Read More

Development of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Moves Forward in Ecuador

first_img This system is a tactical, autonomous UAV prototype that is linked to a ground control station (GCS), capable of carrying out surveillance and reconnaissance missions. So far, CIDFAE is testing and validating its ‘Fénix’ and ‘Gavilán’ prototypes. The unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) project developed by the Ecuadorean Air Force’s (FAE) Research and Development Center (CIDFAE), will allow an air surveillance system to be used on the northern border in the country’s eastern region. The FAE has been working since 2000 in the research of UAVs, gaining experience with projects, namely: ‘RPV Rayo’ and ‘High Altitude Platform Project’ (PGA), a position that has allowed this line of research. By Dialogo August 27, 2013 THAT NEWS IS VERY ENCOURAGING FOR THE LATIN AMERICAN COUNTRIES SINCE THERE’S A POSSIBILITY THAT THIS TECHNOLOGY CAN BE USED THROUGHOUT THE REGION. ALSO, THE ECUADORIAN AIR FORCE IS DEMONSTRATING ONCE AGAIN THEIR PROFESSIONALISM AND ADVANCED TRAINING, OF WHICH WE’RE ALL PROUD OF. This aircraft was designed exclusively to test systems during the flight that will later be integrated into larger prototypes. center_img This type of aeronautical capabilities will allow Ecuador to gain ground as a country that develops their own unmanned aerial systems throughout Latin America, joining a global technological trend. After operational testing, the final UAV-2 Gavilán prototype, with a wingspan of 6.5 meters, automatic take-off and landing capabilities, video transmission in real time from an electric-optic system, photographic and video cameras, and operational ranges of up to 150 km and flight autonomy of up to five hours, will be delivered in December 2013. Furthermore, the initial flight of the UAV “Gorrión” (Sparrow), including automatic take-off and landing, was performed in August. This capacity allows planning of night missions for final prototypes, since a platform operator is not required for recovering the aircraft. last_img read more

Read More

Tips for the Young Lawyer – Improving your research skills

first_imgFrancisco Ramos, Jr.Lawyers often complain that law school did not teach them how to be lawyers. Maybe it taught them how to do research, how to write, but not how to practice law.The fact is, we lawyers don’t know how to research, how to really research, until we leave law school and start practicing.Research for law school briefs and moot court competitions is not the same as when everything is on the line, and things rise or fall on the cases you find. As you hone your research skills to find that much sought after case, consider the following: • Understand the issue: Before you run off to the library, make sure you know the issue you are researching. This is an obvious point, but how many of us have gone back to the partner only to find out we were going down the wrong path. It’s better to risk looking foolish by asking questions when you first get an assignment rather than guarantee looking foolish by wasting two hours in the library. • Know the facts of the case: Don’t settle for knowing what issue to research. You need context. Find out all the facts of your case, so that when you start researching you know what fact patterns to look for in the cases you read. • Ask around. Before you run off to the library or jump on Westlaw, ask other associates if they have done the same research. Perhaps your office has a document management system in place such as Imanage that allows you to search all office memos for key words. Such a search may pull up a memo identical to the one you were about to sit down and prepare. • Go from general to specific. Before you start researching cases and statutes, read through treatises such as Florida Jurisprudence or articles in law reviews or The Florida Bar Journal to obtain an overview of the subject matter you are researching. This overview will help put into context the cases you find which address your issue. • Use the right tools. Rely on the correct tools to get the job done. For Florida evidence, use Earhardt, for Florida civil procedure, use Ramirez, Berman, or Padovano. For Florida trial objections, use Siegel. There is a plethora of treatises and reference books out there. If you have any sway in what books your law firm buys, ask for the leading reference books that apply to your field. • Use key numbers. Once you have read through the relevant legal articles and treatises, it is time to start looking up cases and statutes. If you’re a new attorney, chances are you do all your research on Westlaw. If that’s the case, become accustomed to doing key number searches. Westlaw has taken every legal issue imaginable, and has assigned it a key number. Click on the key number that references your issue and up pops every headnote in every case addressing that issue. doing this, you can feel assured that you have found every case on point. • Find cases involving your jurisdiction. Make sure you have found all the relevant cases in your jurisdiction. Fourth and Fifth Circuit cases are fine, but when drafting a motion in Miami-Dade county, make sure you have located all Third Circuit cases on point. • Find cases involving your judge. Even more important than finding a case in your jurisdiction is finding a case involving your judge. Do a word search for your judge’s name and see what cases you come up with. See when his opinions have been upheld and when they have been overturned. • Lean on a Westlaw representative. If you use Westlaw, you have access to hundreds of research attorneys whose only job is to help you find the cases you want. When your research isn’t producing fruit, don’t be shy to pick up the phone and ask a Westlaw representative for some help. • Chase the rabbit. During your research, you may find a few cases that address your issue. Don’t stop there. What other cases do those cases cite? Look them up and read them. What cases cite the cases you found? Look them up and read them. Keep doing this until you have reviewed every case addressing your issue. Don’t be satisfied until you’ve gone down every rabbit hole. • Take your time. Good research takes time. It takes time to read treatises and law review articles. It takes time to read cases, to key cite them and to read those cases. Take the time. It can be the difference between a winning and losing motion.At first glance, research seems simple enough. That is, until that case your boss insists is out there, the one he read in the advance sheets six months ago, becomes elusive. Then, you have to muster all these skills to track that case down. Francisco Ramos, Jr. is a partner with Clarke Silverglate Campbell Williams & Montgomery, in Miami, practicing in the areas of commercial and personal injury litigation. He can be reached at (305) 377-0700 or [email protected] February 15, 2005 Regular News Improving your research skillscenter_img Tips for the Young Lawyer – Improving your research skillslast_img read more

Read More

Coram Man Charged With Impersonating Police

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A man who allegedly pulled another driver over while impersonating a police officer was arrested after a Suffolk County police officer on patrol came upon the scene over the weekend, authorities said.Thomas O’Connor was driving a Jeep Grand Cherokee with red and white flashing lights on the dashboard that he used to stop another vehicle on Coram-Mt. Sinai Road in his hometown of Coram at 8:27 p.m. Saturday, police said.The 42-year-old was wearing a black shirt with the words “Police K9 Unit” in white letters, a gold Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms shield on a chain around his neck and a police belt equipped with a black pellet gun, flashlight, handcuffs and a police scanner, authorities said.The officer who allegedly caught O’Connor in the act charged him with criminal impersonation, unauthorized use of colored lights on a vehicle and unauthorized use of a police receiver.During his initial court appearance Sunday, bail for O’Connor was set at $5,000 cash or $30,000 bond.Sixth Precinct Crime Control Unit officers are continuing the investigation and ask anyone who has had a similar encounter to call them at 631-854-8627 or 854-8600.O’Connor’s SUV had New York license plate No. CMF7669.last_img read more

Read More

Leadership advice from outside the business world

first_imgSometimes the best business-world advice comes from outside the business world.Harvard Business Review compiled tidbits of wisdom from 10 successful people outside business (sports, arts and even competitive chess) on topics that are of interest to anyone wanting to become a better, more successful leader this year.You can read these folks’ full commentaries here. Below are a few bites from my favorites:– Novelist Salman Rushdie on productivity: “Once your mind understands it has no excuses, it’s remarkable how it begins to play along.”– Tennis pro Andre Agassi on managing emotions: “Typically, the more you can remove emotion, the more efficient you’ll be. You can be an inch from winning but still miles away if you allow emotion to interfere with the last step.” continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Read More

North Bellmore Man Killed in Parkway Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 58-year-old North Bellmore man was killed in a truck crash on the Meadowbrook State Parkway in North Merrick over the weekend.New York State police said Timothy Darwell was driving a Toyota Tacoma northbound when the truck lost control on slippery pavement and struck a tree on the shoulder of the parkway north of the Southern State Parkway at 3:11 p.m. Friday.The victim was taken to Nassau University Medical Center, where he died of his injuries.The New York State Police asking anyone who may have witnessed this crash call them at 631-756-3300.last_img read more

Read More