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Animal shelter sees increase in adoptions amidst pandemic

first_imgWalter joined a local Farmington family last month, and is helping ease some of the stress of the pandemic.FARMINGTON – As the pandemic carries on, the need for connection at home continues to grow. For some, the issue has been solved with the help of the Franklin County Animal Shelter.Over the summer pet adoptions and sales across the country boomed, according to the Washington Post. With people working from home and unable to get out the desire for animal companionship grew. As a result, shelters and breeders saw a huge spike in demand.The Franklin County Animal Shelter has seen an increase in adoption rates, as well as a reduction in animals. The shelter mainly relies on transports from rescue shelters in the south for dogs.“We have a couple rescues down south, like Mississippi, Alabama that pull from kill shelters and they transport them north to us, but with everything with Covid the state kind of put a halt on that for a little while,” said Kaylene Huff, the Front End Supervisor and Media Coordinator at the Franklin County Animal Shelter.Even though the transports are up and running again, the numbers still are not as high as they were.“We used to be able to pull 10-15 dogs at a time and now the highest transport we’ve had since last March was about six dogs,” said Huff.Farmington resident Meg Willing just adopted a second dog, seeing the 12-week-old chocolate doodle Walter as a benefit to everyone in the house, including her 15-year-old mini poodle Mousse.“I think the pandemic has asked us all to connect more fully with our sense of home, which means different things for different people. Maybe that’s baking bread or learning to knit a sweater or reading a new book series or nostalgia watching Dawson’s Creek. Animal companionship is something that’s deeply interwoven to my sense of home, so that seemed like a natural choice for me,” wrote Willing.Pet adoptions aren’t for everyone though. Huff advises anyone looking to adopt to really make sure they have the available time and should take into account how much time they will have when the pandemic ends.“Right now you’re home, but that can cause issues once you start going back to work with separation anxiety. All of a sudden you’re not there anymore which your pet has kind of gotten used to,” said Huff. “There are certain variables you need to take into account before you go down that road.”With that said anyone with any interest in scheduling an appointment can reach the Franklin County Animal Shelter at 778-2638.last_img read more

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Next up for renewal: Winthrop

first_imgWinthrop House is expected to be the next undergraduate residence to be renewed as part of the effort to reinvigorate Harvard College’s historic House system, Dean Michael D. Smith of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) announced today. Under the plan, and pending final approvals in coming years, Winthrop will be taken offline for 15 months immediately following Commencement in 2016, and will reopen to undergraduates in the fall of 2017.The plans for Winthrop House follow the recent reopening of the renewed Stone Hall (the neo-Georgian portion of Quincy House that was formerly Old Quincy) and the ongoing construction on Leverett House’s McKinlock Hall, and will follow the renewal of Dunster House scheduled to begin in June. The announcement also follows last Saturday’s launch of the FAS Capital Campaign, at which it was revealed that House renewal and the “student experience” constitute one of the six main fundraising priorities.“Even as we confronted the fiscal challenges of the last few years, we’ve continued to make progress on House renewal. It’s a top priority for the College, the FAS, and the University,” Smith said. “It is also a major priority for the capital campaign.  The renewal of Stone Hall has been a terrific success, with great feedback so far from students and Quincy House administrators. With the renewal of Leverett McKinlock under way this year and Dunster House slated for construction beginning this summer, this is the right time to begin preparations for the next House to be renewed, Winthrop.”Smith affirmed plans announced last year to conduct a strategic assessment of the first three House renewal test projects during the 2015–16 academic year.Smith reiterated the fundamental goals of House renewal: preserving the historic character of the Houses; invigorating House life; connecting spaces and nurturing community; providing modern accommodations and sustainable operations; and accommodating the future.“As Quincy House Master Lee Gehrke said at the opening ceremony for Stone Hall, House renewal has always been about more than bricks and mortar,” Smith said.  “House renewal is about re-envisioning the Houses and the spaces they contain to better support today’s students and programming, while at the same time preserving the historic character that makes Harvard’s residential system so special. We hope to refresh the Houses — both physically and programmatically — to better serve as living-learning communities for the 21st century.”“The House system creates wonderful multigenerational communities of undergraduate and graduate students and faculty living and learning together,” said Donald Pfister, interim dean of Harvard College and Asa Gray Professor of Systematic Botany. “I learned firsthand the important role the Houses play in the social and intellectual life of Harvard College as the master of Kirkland House for 18 years. By renewing the Houses, we are reinvigorating the undergraduate experience for future generations of College students and faculty.”Winthrop House consists of two buildings, Gore and Standish halls, both built in 1916 as freshman dorms, each with its own dining hall and social spaces. Following President A. Lawrence Lowell’s creation of the House system in the 1920s, the buildings were converted into a single House, with dining and social spaces consolidated.  The buildings were originally intended to house 300 first-year students. Today, more than 400 sophomores, juniors, and seniors call Winthrop home. The House’s name honors two men, John Winthrop, the first governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and his descendent and namesake, an astronomer who served as Harvard’s president from 1773–1774.“Stephanie and I are delighted that Winthrop House is next in line for House renewal,” said  House Master Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., clinical professor of law at Harvard Law School and director of the Harvard Criminal Justice Institute. “We look forward to working with our students, Harvard staff, and construction professionals in designing a living-learning space to accommodate Winthropians for years to come.”As with Stone Hall, McKinlock Hall, and Dunster House, the plans to renew Winthrop will follow guidelines informed by the recommendations of the House Program Planning Committee, a group of undergraduates, House masters, faculty, and administrators who engaged in a yearlong conversation about the mission and purpose of the undergraduate Houses and consulted broadly with undergraduates and other faculty. As in the first three projects, Winthrop students will live in swing housing during the 2016–17 academic year, while the House is under construction.Since plans to renew Stone Hall were announced in 2011, nearly a dozen student-feedback groups have provided comments and recommendations on designs for each renewal project. Feedback groups also have been engaged on the design of and programming for swing housing and will be consulted on the redesign of Winthrop.The strategic assessment will document the lessons learned in design, construction, financing, and programming from the first three projects. The results will help guide future projects, including Winthrop.The assessment activities will include surveys of students living in the three completed projects, audit energy use, confirm life-cycle and operating-cost analyses, evaluate engineering strategies, and identify and evaluate strategic procurement opportunities.“We learned a great deal from the successful completion of the first test project, Stone Hall,” Smith said. “We are already learning more from the second test project, Leverett McKinlock, the first facility that includes a dining hall, social spaces, and a master’s residence.  We are applying these lessons as we tackle the first full House, Dunster.“We have believed from the beginning that we would need to step back after the completion of the first full House to very strategically and deeply assess the first three projects and to ensure those lessons are applied to the future,” he said.  “House renewal is such an important project for Harvard — a project that will impact undergraduates for the next century — that we must make sure we are getting it right for future generations.“One of the lessons we have already learned is that preparation for the renewal of a full House is better done over four years, not three. We’ll be using that timing with Winthrop House,” said Smith.From the beginning, the House renewal project has been dependent on scores of individuals throughout the Harvard community, and particularly on the generosity of alumni donors.“I want to thank again every Harvard alum who has contributed to House renewal,” Smith said. “By doing so, you are truly influencing the residential experience of thousands of future Harvard College students.“I also want to thank the masters of Quincy, Leverett, Dunster, and Winthrop Houses,” Smith added. “They have been true partners in this important endeavor and have really helped guide how we approached each House to date. I also want to thank the architects — Steve Kieran and his team at Kieran Timberlake — who have done a superb job of maintaining the historic character of each of these projects while ensuring they can support the living and learning needs of 21st-century undergraduates.”Smith also thanked Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, which was charged with transforming the former Inn at Harvard into the hub for swing space; Dimeo Construction, which served as the construction manager for Stone and Leverett McKinlock; and Turner Construction and Gilbane, the construction managers for Dunster and for swing space, respectively.last_img read more

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Charit Creek Lodge: An Enclave Under the Stars

first_imgDeep within the Tennessee wilds of Big South Fork, a newly-arisen enclave has grabbed the attention of nature lovers, campers, hikers, and horseback aficionados. It’s called Charit Creek Lodge, and they’re offering a beautiful, uniquely-rustic experience only two hours outside of Nashville.Big South Fork is renowned for its bewitching wilderness. A naked park fleeced with chestnut oaks and pines spanning nearly 125,000 acres, the area is consumed with hair-raising views of nature and wildlife. A 600-foot gorge bends through the innermost heart of the park’s plateau, giving the area its distinct charm, while the park pinnacles at the Twin Arches Summit—a topmost point accessible by trail with spectacular views spanning below.candlelight-dinnerHikers in particular will enjoy the many trails winding throughout the Lodge’s surrounding area. Abundant with natural swimming holes, waterfalls, and earth-formed arches cambering overhead, these hike-able paths are available to anyone staying at the Lodge. The Sheltowee Trace trailhead—a 300-mile trail that courses through Big South Fork’s entirety—even begins at Charit Creek Lodge, making the lodge an invaluable starting point for resident hikers. The majority of trails here are even navigable by horseback or mountain bike.Horses may be stabled in their own building near the cabins, and lodge-owned mountain bikes will become available to residents in Spring 2015. Those seeking the alternative solidarity of canoeing or kayaking may paddle the Big South Fork River, the water only a few miles from the Lodge. And for less adventurous, horseshoe tossing and bocce ball are readily available. The list of activities available to guests of Charit Creek Lodge is seemingly endless.charit-creek-lodge-cabinsWhat makes the Lodge interesting is it withholds some of the oldest-standing cabins in the National Park system today, some existing since the early 1800’s. Hand-built fences zigzag the collective area, encasing it within a hollow, emerald grassland peppered with wildflowers. All cabins offer toasty, wood-burning stoves and comfortable bedding. Though electricity isn’t featured, the area has fully-operable plumbing, showers, sinks, and clean water. But let’s not forget: the experience is fully-private, offering full-service accommodations at only $80 a night.When it comes to meals, breakfast and dinner are served free with this initial price. Every meal is fully-prepared beforehand by the staff, dinner experienced by the comely flicker of kerosene lamps. Chosen foods are familiar to Southern, home-style cuisine, featured plates ranging from cornbread and cast iron skillet-grilled meats, candied yams and spicy turnip greens. Bellies filled, residents may proceed to the rocking chairs upon the decks to stargaze into the infinitesimal beauty of the Cosmos, exceedingly clear amongst the solitude of nature. Novels may be read by candlelight or roaring fires kindled outside, all the while listening to the chorus of cicadas, glow bugs streaking the star-ridden sky above.The experience of Charit Creek Lodge is true charm. It offers a classical feel like no other. It returns visitors to their center, their sense of peace and belonging in the world. The spirit becomes reawakened by the placidity of nature in this place, and after gazing back in time here, one returns to the daily grind at home increasingly self-aware.–Story by R.F. Grant, a Denver-based freelance writer. View more of his work at rfgrant.com.For more information visit the Charit Creek Lodge website at www.ccl-bsf.com.last_img read more

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Make it easier to access state records

first_imgRe: April 10 editorial, “Add FOIL forms to websites,” The governor should boost transparency and citizen participation by signing legislation to strengthen the Freedom of Information Law, known as FOIL, by making it easier to get state government records.FOIL empowers citizens by giving them a right to request and receive government records so they can understand how their tax dollars are spent and can hold government accountable.Unfortunately, requesting information from state agencies can be difficult because not all take online requests and they each have their own procedures and requirements for requesting information. Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion The bill on the governor’s desk [S.7431(Murphy)/A.2131 (Peoples-Stokes)] would require state agencies to provide an online request form if the agency has a website. In an age when New Yorkers get their news, shop and pay their bills online, getting information from state government should be an easy online experience, too.By signing this bill, the governor would help restore the public’s trust in government.Creating an easy, standardized process for citizens to request and gather information from the multitude of government agencies should be a no-brainer. Why not make it easier for citizens to participate in a government?Brittanie JohnsonAlbanyThe writer is policy associate for the New York Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG).More from The Daily Gazette:Feds: Albany man sentenced for role in romance scamFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

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Pot, alcohol most common cause of youth substance-use hospitalizations: report

first_imgCTV News 19 September 2019Family First Comment: For youth who stayed in hospital for cannabis use, 81 per cent received care for a mental-health issue such as anxiety, says the report.Marijuana and alcohol were the most common substances leading to hospitalization of youth aged 10 to 24 across the country, says a report that highlights the prevalence of mental-health conditions as contributing factors.About 23,500 people in that age group were hospitalized for harm caused by substance use, amounting to an average of 65 hospitalizations every day between April 2017 and March 2018, says the Canadian Institute for Health Information in a report released Thursday.Overall, cannabis was documented in almost 40 per cent of hospitalizations and alcohol was associated with 26 per cent of hospital stays, says the report that calls for improved access to initiatives that reduce risks and harms from substance use, more mental-health and support services as well as early treatment strategies.For youth who stayed in hospital for cannabis use, 81 per cent received care for a mental-health issue such as anxiety, says the report. Meanwhile, 49 per cent of opioid-related stays also involved care for mental-health treatment.Jean Harvey, director of the institute’s population and health initiative, said the data show only the “the tip of the iceberg” because they don’t include care in emergency rooms, family doctors’ offices, addiction centres or deaths from overdose.The report is also based on data collected before cannabis was legalized last October, suggesting the information is a baseline for further research involving youth drug use, Harvey said.“We need to be protecting kids, we need to be educating kids that just because it is legal doesn’t mean it’s safe,” she said. “I think it can be a bit of a wake-up call for parents and those who are working with youth.”READ MORE: https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/pot-alcohol-most-common-cause-of-youth-substance-use-hospitalizations-report-1.4600322Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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Argonauts Clinch GSC Tournament Berth

first_imgArgonauts Clinch GSC Tournament Berth Share April 29, 2007Box ScoreHUNTSVILLE, Ala. – Less than one month ago, West Florida was in next to last place in the Gulf South Conference East Division. However, the Argonauts late season turnaround continued on Sunday. West Florida pounded out 11 hits to defeat 10th ranked Alabama-Huntsville 6-4 at the Charger Softball Complex. With the win, West Florida (33-23, 13-10 GSC) clinched their 13th consecutive Gulf South Conference Tournament berth. Alabama-Huntsville (40-15, 13-9 GSC) dropped their second straight to West Florida.”Offense has been our weakness this season, but we hit the ball very well today,” said head coach Tami Cyr. “We always had the potential to hit, but we just kept struggling at times.”West Florida started quickly with a two-run first inning. Ashlee Simpson (Decatur, Ala./Jefferson State CC) led off the game by reaching on a fielding error and was advanced to second on a Whitney Gay (Cantonment, Fla./Tate HS) sacrifice bunt. With two outs and runners at first and second, Valerie Staub (East Brunswick, N.J./Wallace-Dothan CC) delivered a two-run double off of Chargers starter Sage Woodham to give West Florida a 2-0 advantage.Alabama-Huntsville answered with a run in the bottom of the first inning on an RBI single by Sydney Simpson. The Chargers tied the game in the bottom of the second inning on an RBI bunt single by Megan Blanchard.West Florida regained the lead in the top of the fifth inning. After Gay led off with a double, pinch-runner Dawnyele Stapleton (Navarre, Fla./Navarre HS) advanced to third on Taren Walton’s (Pensacola, Fla./Daytona Beach CC) sacrifice bunt. Stapleton came around to score on Nicky VanCamp’s (Davenport, Iowa/Kirkwood CC) sacrifice fly RBI. But the lead was short-lived as Stephanie Pinto’s two out, RBI single in the bottom of the fifth inning tied the game at three.West Florida grabbed the lead for good in the top of the sixth inning. Ellen Marsh (Ankeny, Iowa/Central Florida CC) led off with a double and was sacrificed to third by Julie Carroll (Calgary, Alberta, Canada/Liberty Univ.). Marsh scored the go-ahead run on Heather Bell’s (Bradenton, Fla./Bayshore HS) RBI single to center field. With runners at first and second and two outs, Gay delivered an RBI single. Chastang later scored from third on a failed pick-off attempt at second base to give West Florida a 6-3 lead. Alabama-Huntsville put two runners on and one out in the bottom of the sixth inning but were unable to score.Alabama-Huntsville put together a two out rally in the bottom of the seventh inning. With runners at first and second, Caroline Weatherly plated a run with an RBI single. Erin Duke came to the plate representing the winning run, but Emily Burge (Pace, Fla./Pace HS) induced Duke to pop out to end the game.”This was such an important game for us to win, so I just went out with a positive attitude, along with confidence in myself and the team,” said Burge. “I was never really rattled during the game, since I knew our offense would be able to support me.”Burge (15-13) earned the win after allowing four runs on eight hits with four walks and six strikeouts. It was her first career win against Alabama-Huntsville in four starts. Woodham (20-5) suffered the loss after giving up four runs (two earned) on seven hits with one walk and three strikeouts. Gay, VanCamp, Marsh and Bell collected eight of the Argonauts 11 hitsPrint Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Banks DIH to sponsor Caribbean Schoolboys Boxing championships

first_imgBANKS DIH Limited has teamed up with the Guyana Boxing Association (GBA) for this weekend’s second Annual Caribbean Schoolboys and Junior Boxing championships at the National Gymnasium on Mandela Avenue.The local beverage giant will sponsor the regional championships under its Rainforest Waters brand.President of the Guyana Boxing Association (GBA) Steve Ninvalle received the sponsorship cheque from the Brand Manager, Clive Pellew, during a simple presentation ceremony yesterday.Ninvalle expressed gratitude to Banks DIH Limited for the timely sponsorship of the event which is being hosted for the second time by the GBA.Banks DIH Communications Manager, Troy Peters, said the tournament continues to support the development of boxing in the Caribbean and his company was very supportive of this initiative.He extended a warm welcome to the visiting teams and officials and made a call to the Guyana team to win the title.Six countries including Guyana will compete in the tournament which opens this evening and runs until Sunday at the National Gymnasium.The other competing countries are Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, Jamaica and St Lucia.Fight time each night is 19:00hrs.last_img read more

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Look Loy wants CONCACAF Qualifiers postponed

first_imgKEITH Look Loy, the driving force behind the formation of the United T&T Football Association (TTFA), is calling on the Caribbean Football Union (CFU), being led by Barbadian Randolph Harris, to seek the postponement of the CONCACAF World Cup Qualifiers which are scheduled to begin in October.Look Loy yesterday said he believes the postponement of the tournament until next year is something that Harris and CFU should be arguing for because of the outbreak of the deadly coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic which has already claimed the lives of hundreds of thousands around the world.“Asia has already pushed its qualifiers back to 2021 (next year), and CONCACAF has postponed the CFU Club Championship, so why doesn’t Harris do it in the interest of saving lives. It will be impossible to adhere to quarantine regulations because of the regularity at which matches are to be played,” said Look Loy.The former FIFA Youth Development Officer pointed to a FIFA statement which prohibited players from being released from their clubs to represent their countries in UEFA World Cup Qualifiers because of the coronavirus. The draw for the qualifiers took place last week and it pooled T&T in a group with St Kitts/Nevis, Guyana, The Bahamas and Puerto Rico, with only the winner progressing to the second round of the qualifiers.National coach Terry Fenwick told Guardian Media Sports last week he sees the group as a promising one to emerge from, but financial constraints have put his team in an unfavourable position.Fenwick said he was told by Robert Hadad, chairman of the FIFA-appointed Normalisation Committee, that his hands are tied from providing financial assistance to the team because of the ongoing court battle between the ousted United TTFA elected officers and the sport’s supreme body – FIFA.However, Look Loy took a swipe at the normalisation committee, calling on its members to access the more than $20M sitting in FIFA headquarters in Zurich, Switzerland because of the reluctance of FIFA to hand it over because of the ongoing court battle.“For Hadad, FIFA and the normalisation to say their hands are tied is an outright lie. They paid office staff and they have right now, in excess of $20M, which represents grants and COVID Relief Funds etc. I am appealing to the normalisation committee to access the funding for the qualifying tournament in October.”He said the reluctance of the normalisation committee to access the funding is a deliberate attempt to frustrate the United TTFA in its battle with FIFA to have the appointment of the normalisation committee overturned. He explained that when they took over the management of the sport in November last year, the country saw for the first time in five years, a proper technical department.He said, “For the first time we had national teams fully staffed and training. And at short notice, we had the Under-20 women’s team compete in the Dominican Republic at the CONCACAF Tournament and reach the quarterfinal round, so our plans were working but then came FIFA and mashed up everything.”last_img read more

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MBB : Melo to return to roster for St. John’s game

first_imgUPDATED: Feb. 2, 11:38 a.m.Syracuse center Fab Melo has been reinstated and will be eligible to play against St. John’s Saturday after missing three straight games, the Syracuse athletics department confirmed in a statement Thursday.‘Sophomore Fab Melo will return to the Syracuse University men’s basketball playing roster beginning this Saturday against St. John’s in Madison Square Garden,’ the statement said.Melo has not played since Jan. 16 due to an unspecified academic issue.Melo tweeted Wednesday, ‘Can somebody tell @scoopjardine that #lobcity is back.’ Syracuse’s senior point guard Scoop Jardine has connected with the sophomore center on alley-oop plays many times throughout the year.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMelo did not travel with the team on its most recent road trip, a two-game swing against Notre Dame and Cincinnati. He wore street clothes on the bench in Syracuse’s win over West Virginia on Saturday. The sophomore center leads the Orange with 5.7 rebounds and 3.0 blocks per game.With Melo out, freshman Rakeem Christmas slid into the starting center spot from his usual place as the starting power forward. Sophomore C.J. Fair took over Christmas’ old starting position while sophomore Baye Keita saw significantly more playing time coming off the bench.SU went 2-1 without Melo, suffering its only loss of the season against the Fighting Irish. Melo has been practicing with the team throughout the two-week period.Given university policy and federal student privacy laws, the athletic department could provide no other details about the matter, the athletic department’s statement [email protected]@syr.edu  Facebook Twitter Google+ Commentscenter_img Published on February 1, 2012 at 12:00 pmlast_img read more

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Rice leads Syracuse past St. John’s in Cobb County Lacrosse Classic

first_imgThe team that prides itself as “New York’s College Team” faced off against a team that plays its home games in the heart of New York City at the Cobb County Lacrosse Classic in Kennesaw, Ga., on Saturday.No. 9 Syracuse and No. 20 St. John’s, former Big East rivals, traveled south to play in a small town 30 minutes northwest of Atlanta. Syracuse (3-2, 0-2 Atlantic Coast), playing in its first game in the state of Georgia in 87 years, defeated St. John’s (2-3) 14-8 at Fifth Third Bank Stadium.Attack Kevin Rice led the Orange with eight points, netting four goals and four assists. Derek Maltz, who rejoined the first-line attack in place of Randy Staats, who sat out with a leg injury, recorded five points with four goals and one assist. Attack Dylan Donahue also added three goals.Looking to avenge its loss to then-No. 4 Virginia last weekend, the Orange came out with a vengeance. SU scored eight of its 14 goals in the first quarter, building a lead it didn’t relinquish for the final 50 minutes.Rice scored three goals in the opening frame, including the game’s first just 57 seconds in. The junior also scored to put the Orange ahead 3-2, giving SU the lead for good.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textNicky Galasso scored in a man-up advantage on a feed from Maltz to give the Orange a 7-3 lead. It was the first goal in a Syracuse uniform for the North Carolina transfer.Donahue scored with 34 seconds left in the opening quarter to put SU in front 8-3.The redshirt sophomore started the second quarter where he left off in the first, scoring a goal to give the Orange a 9-3 advantage. Galasso scored his second goal quickly after to extend the lead to 10-3.Donahue scored again before the half, giving Syracuse an 11-3 lead at the midway point.St. John’s broke an eight-goal run when Colin Keegan scored at the 9:37 mark of the third quarter to cut the deficit to 12-4 going into the fourth quarter.The Red Storm scored four of the six goals that were scored in the fourth and final quarter. The Red Storm scored the first goal of the fourth, cutting the deficit to 12-5. But Maltz scored two goals in less than a minute to extend SU’s lead to 14-5.The Red Storm scored the game’s final three goals, but it wasn’t enough.Syracuse goalkeeper Dominic Lamolinara played the first three quarters and had 12 saves. Bobby Wardwell played the fourth quarter and had just one save.The win ends SU’s two-game losing streak and also makes Syracuse 8-0 all-time against St. John’s, including a 3-0 record in neutral-site games.Syracuse continues its nonconference break from ACC play when it travels to Baltimore to face Johns Hopkins on Saturday at noon. Comments Published on March 8, 2014 at 9:13 pm Contact Josh: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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