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The #GBBO phenomenon and big brands

first_imgThe Great British Bake Off is back and here British Baker looks at how the show has become a social media phenomenon.The Great British Bake Off returned to our screens last week and there were a staggering 116,861 tweets during the first episode alone, along with 4,088 tweets being sent out during the first minute of the show.Recent research by Nielsen found that a 15% of TV viewers said they enjoyed watching television more when social media was involved and when it comes to The Great British Bake Off 74% of those tweeting were women.The show is that popular it has now become a multimedia event that a number of big brands are using for their own ends. Are you doing the same?Here is a collection of just some of the tweets from big companies last week as an illustration of how smaller bakers can get involved: [<a href=”//storify.com/allyfaughnan/great-british-bake-off” target=”_blank”>View the story “How big brands use The Great British Bake Off” on Storify</a>]last_img read more

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Track Drama: Pit Road

first_imgREAD MORE: Fan Forums: Chat here with fellow NASCAR fans RECAP: Complete Daytona coverage Track Drama: Pit Road video WATCH: Race RePlay: Daytona highlights WATCH: Victory Lane 1-on-1 with Johnson READ: Standings Shuffle after Daytonalast_img

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first_imgJoe Russo spent the weekend in Colorado, performing three nights in three cities with his band Joe Russo’s Almost Dead. The party didn’t stop there, however, as members of Almost Dead reunited as Bustle In Your Hedgerow for an intimate performance on Sunday night, December 18th. The “Bustle” band consists of Russo, Dave Dreiwitz, Marco Benevento and Scott Metzger – basically everyone from Almost Dead except for Tom Hamilton. While Almost Dead focuses on the music of the Grateful Dead, Bustle In Your Hedgerow is, predictably, all Led Zeppelin.The show was a combined celebration for the Binske Holiday Party and Russo’s 40th birthday, which he celebrated on the 18th. Though Bustle shows have become rarities, due to the overwhelming demand of Almost Dead, this was quite the performance! The band opened with “Song Remains The Same” and featured hits from Zeppelin’s entire catalog in their extended set.Fortunately, thanks to taper Ted Rockwell, we can listen in on full audio from this masterful performance. Enjoy!last_img read more

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Gorillaz, Pusha T, And A Holographic Mavis Staples Perform On Colbert

first_imgThe seventh studio effort from the Gorillaz came out today, and the feelings are mixed. Seemingly attached to the modernization of pop music, the 26 tracks of Humanz provide very little hope for a long-term relationship with any one of them. Though Damon Albarn notes there are still 40-45 tracks that didn’t make it onto the record, the contemporary moment of the Gorillaz is bland. Alas, it is still interesting to watch the Albarn and Hewlett brainchild re-emerge after a seven year hiatus.In support of today’s album release, the virtual band stopped by The Late Show with Stephen Colbert for a performance of “Let Me Out.” Albarn recruited Seye Adelekan, Jesse Hackett, Mike Smith, Karl Vanden Bossche, Gabriel Wallace, Jeff Wooton, along with a crew of five backup singers to perform. The song’s collaborator Pusha T was there to deliver his raps, while Mavis Staples was projected through a hologram on the stage’s walls. While the band normally relies on virtual production, with all instrumentation done behind a curtain, this performance was totally in-your-face and did not see 2-D, Murdoc, Russel, or Noodle.Watch the Gorillaz perform “Let Me Out” below:last_img read more

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Polish utilities taking small steps in transition from coal to renewables

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Poland’s largest power generators are slowly waking up to what many of their European peers have long internalized as part of their strategies: that coal may not be king for much longer.State-run utilities like PGE Polska Grupa Energetyczna SA and TAURON Polska Energia SA have recently started to complement their coal-heavy portfolios with wind and solar power. The moves come as political and investor pressure around climate change is mounting and as rising carbon prices under the EU’s emissions trading scheme are squeezing earnings from the large hard coal and lignite-fired power stations that still produce most of Poland’s power.In a bow to EU climate policies, Tauron said May 27 that it would replace most of its coal-burning plants with renewables over the next decade, lifting wind and solar capacity to 65% of its power generation by 2030. At the moment, the utility runs 4,291 MW of thermal power plant capacity, compared with only 334 MW from wind farms and hydropower plants.Analysts are expecting a similar shift at state-owned PGE, by far the largest power producer in Poland, with an installed capacity of over 16,000 MW. The company will release its own strategic update in August.But on a May 29 call with analysts, Henryk Baranowski, president of the board and CEO of PGE, touted that the company had just signed what it says is Poland’s first corporate power purchase agreement, selling the output of a planned 5-MW solar farm to the operator of a local sulfur mine. Baranowski also said that the utility wants to develop 2,500 MW of additional PV capacity over the next decade.“This is of course a longer prospect, reaching 2030,” he said. “However, it is important that we have already taken the first steps toward that goal.” The company has also been busy looking for partners to build some of the first offshore wind farms in the country, competing with Polish energy group Polenergia SA.More ($): Polish utilities plot move away from coal as climate pressure, carbon costs rise Polish utilities taking small steps in transition from coal to renewableslast_img read more

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first_imgWild Ponies of Chincoteague are put in corrals after visitors ignore ban An elephant at a park in South Africa trampled a suspected rhino poacher and then his body was eaten by a pride of lions, rangers at Kruger National Park said. Park officials noted that all that remained of the man was his skull and a pair of pants. Four of his accomplices were arrested, telling the man’s relatives that they had all been in the park to poach rhinos when an elephant killed him. This type of incident is not unheard of. Last year, lions killed as many as three rhino poachers at a South African game preserve. There are 20,000 wild rhinos living in South Africa, which make up about 80 percent of the world’s population. In the past decade, 7,000 rhinos have been illegally killed by poachers that sell rhino horns to the Asian market, where they go for about $9,000 per pound. The first motor vehicle fatality of the year has occurred on the Blue Ridge Parkway. The motorcyclist was traveling north on the parkway near Humpback Rocks at milepost 7. According to reports, the motorcyclist and two others entered a curb when one of the motorcyclists lost control and laid down his bike. Another motorcyclist, Da’juan Morrison of Rockingham, Va tried to avoid the downed biker and lost control of his bike. He was ejected from his motorcycle, hit a guardrail and was pronounced dead at the scene. In 2018 there were almost 300 motor vehicle accidents on the Blue Ridge Parkway, seven of which resulted in death. Motorcyclist dies on Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginiacenter_img A band of Chincoteague ponies have been corralled on Assateague Island after visitors to the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia disregarded warnings and approached the animals. “We have tried numerous times to educate the public about the dangers of getting too close to the ponies,” Denise Bowden, spokesperson for the Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Company, who cares for the ponies, told the Salisbury Daily Times. “Still, people continue to do dangerous things when they encounter them.” Visitors are asked to stay at least 50 feet from the ponies and to restrain from feeding or touching the wild animals. South African rhino poacher is trampled by elephants and then eaten by lionslast_img read more

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Colombian Soldier Injured by Mine Helps His Wounded Comrades

first_imgFellow Troops transported him to a hospital in San Vicente del Caguán for surgery, after which he began a lengthy and arduous rehabilitation process. Days later, in order to regain some sense of normalcy, he became interested in learning everything he could about prostheses. The need for prosthetic devices in Colombia is a consequence of the antipersonnel mines which have killed more than 2,000 people and injured more than 9,000 people since 1990, according to the Colombian government’s Directorate for Comprehensive Action against Antipersonnel Mines (DAICMA). “I had never seen a prosthesis before in my life,” he said. “There were other guys in my unit who’d lost limbs before I did, but I never visited them because it was distressing, and I didn’t have the strength to see them like that, without a leg or an arm; I would rather call them to see how it was going, and they did the same when it happened to me.” Izquierdo — who was 28 when he was injured during a 2009 Military operation near La Uribe, in the department of Meta — works in the Prosthesis and Orthosis section of Bogotá’s Central Military Hospital, manufacturing about 400 prostheses every year for victims of land mines. Organizations such as Corporación Matamoros also support wounded Military service members and police officers, as well as their families. Working hand-in-hand with the Ministry of Defense for more than two decades, the organization has provided support to thousands of service members to reintegrate them into society through training and education, which enables them to obtain new employment opportunities. “Some 99.9 percent of a prosthesis’ effectiveness is you,” he said. “If you don’t have good muscle control, if you aren’t in good physical shape, you won’t be able to work the prosthesis. You need training for rehabilitation, but first comes your head, because where there’s a will, there’s a way.” The Soldier explained that his faith was also a key element in speeding up the recovery process. He realized his injury is fundamental to his path in life, which is to help other injured people. Izquierdo now dreams of studying Orthosis and Prosthesis Engineering, so he can use his experience and knowledge to create new systems to improve the quality and access of prostheses for persons. “My goal now is to find financial assistance. There is no such engineering program in Colombia, but there are in Mexico, the United States, Germany, and El Salvador.” In Colombia, domestic-made prostheses start at 500,000 pesos (about $250), but Izquierdo says those are not ideal, because they can cause lesions on the body. Imported prostheses cost more than 200 million pesos ($100,000), but if they were made domestically, they would be much more affordable. However, Izquierdo quickly felt the need to take a more active role in his recovery and began to research everything he could about prostheses. Then, he was given the opportunity to train as a technician at the National Learning Service (SENA), where he studied for three years. Since then, he has stayed up-to-date on new techniques and procedures to improve the quality of prostheses manufactured in Colombia. Becoming a technician to help others However, Izquierdo quickly felt the need to take a more active role in his recovery and began to research everything he could about prostheses. Then, he was given the opportunity to train as a technician at the National Learning Service (SENA), where he studied for three years. Since then, he has stayed up-to-date on new techniques and procedures to improve the quality of prostheses manufactured in Colombia. Izquierdo recounted how a land mine injured him, and how his wounds put him on the path to helping other injured Soldiers. The National Army’s Demining Battalion (BIDES) is responsible for cleaning and demining those areas under the guidance of the humanitarian organization Norwegian People’s Aid. Although the majority of the wounded are Military and police service members, many are rural residents – adults and children who continue to lose life and limbs in the minefields, Izquierdo said. This man is truly a hero, that is what God wants, all of us to help each other without excluding anyone for their physical condition. Onward, Colombian I live in Brazil. I lost my right leg in a car accident resulting in thrombosis. Today, I use a prosthesis donated by the Brazilian Single Health System (SUS), which isn’t the best, but it would be great if they could donate a slightly better prosthesis because I can’t afford one. “At that instant, I felt that my life was at its end, but I summoned the strength to give myself first aid, I applied a tourniquet so I wouldn’t bleed out, because I had completely lost my limb; it had been amputated,” he said. “But thank God I was the nurse, and I was carrying a first aid kit.” By Dialogo May 28, 2015 Becoming a technician to help others “During the operation, we entered a camp inhabited by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), and while making an offensive withdrawal, I entered a minefield, and in a matter of seconds, I lost my leg.” Izquierdo survives terrible injury Izquierdo — who was 28 when he was injured during a 2009 Military operation near La Uribe, in the department of Meta — works in the Prosthesis and Orthosis section of Bogotá’s Central Military Hospital, manufacturing about 400 prostheses every year for victims of land mines. “During the operation, we entered a camp inhabited by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), and while making an offensive withdrawal, I entered a minefield, and in a matter of seconds, I lost my leg.” Fellow Troops transported him to a hospital in San Vicente del Caguán for surgery, after which he began a lengthy and arduous rehabilitation process. Days later, in order to regain some sense of normalcy, he became interested in learning everything he could about prostheses. In 2012, Izquierdo finished his first prosthesis. His accomplishment was amplified when he saw a patient using it, casting his crutches aside. “You see that the ones who use crutches cannot use their hands, for example, to hold their children’s hands or simply to grasp what they need,” Izquierdo said. “So knowing that you removed that limitation through a prosthesis is a unique and beautiful thing … you need your arms, and you feel more useful with your arms free and not bound to crutches.” Force of will, faith and goals Throughout his adversity, Izquierdo never lost hope. People who are recovering from land mine injuries need to maintain a positive attitude and maintain their physical fitness to maximize their recovery. Colombian National Army Soldier Jesús María Izquierdo is one of about 6,000 uniformed service members injured by antipersonnel mines as a result of the armed conflict in Colombia during the past two decades. But he hasn’t allowed the loss of his left leg to stop him: he makes prostheses for his comrades-in-arms who have also been maimed in minefields. In 2012, Izquierdo finished his first prosthesis. His accomplishment was amplified when he saw a patient using it, casting his crutches aside. “You see that the ones who use crutches cannot use their hands, for example, to hold their children’s hands or simply to grasp what they need,” Izquierdo said. “So knowing that you removed that limitation through a prosthesis is a unique and beautiful thing … you need your arms, and you feel more useful with your arms free and not bound to crutches.” Force of will, faith and goals Throughout his adversity, Izquierdo never lost hope. People who are recovering from land mine injuries need to maintain a positive attitude and maintain their physical fitness to maximize their recovery. “At that instant, I felt that my life was at its end, but I summoned the strength to give myself first aid, I applied a tourniquet so I wouldn’t bleed out, because I had completely lost my limb; it had been amputated,” he said. “But thank God I was the nurse, and I was carrying a first aid kit.” Colombian National Army Soldier Jesús María Izquierdo is one of about 6,000 uniformed service members injured by antipersonnel mines as a result of the armed conflict in Colombia during the past two decades. But he hasn’t allowed the loss of his left leg to stop him: he makes prostheses for his comrades-in-arms who have also been maimed in minefields. There are new victims every week. Since January 1, 79 Colombian nationals have been injured by explosive devices. However, in light of the recent agreement between the government and the FARC on demining, there is hope that the risk of stepping on a mine in Colombia will be reduced substantially. At that very moment, his comrades started fighting with a large group of FARC members, and he had to wait alone for two hours for assistance, “immersed in uncertainty and intense pain.” The National Army’s Demining Battalion (BIDES) is responsible for cleaning and demining those areas under the guidance of the humanitarian organization Norwegian People’s Aid. Although the majority of the wounded are Military and police service members, many are rural residents – adults and children who continue to lose life and limbs in the minefields, Izquierdo said. Izquierdo recounted how a land mine injured him, and how his wounds put him on the path to helping other injured Soldiers. At that very moment, his comrades started fighting with a large group of FARC members, and he had to wait alone for two hours for assistance, “immersed in uncertainty and intense pain.” Once he found himself in that very situation, he was determined to get rehabilitation and learn from his own experiences for his benefit and that of other Soldiers who would need help in the future. Just like any other Service Member injured by explosive devices, Izquierdo received treatment from medical specialists and began his rehabilitation at the Military Hospital. The treatment generally lasts six months. “I had never seen a prosthesis before in my life,” he said. “There were other guys in my unit who’d lost limbs before I did, but I never visited them because it was distressing, and I didn’t have the strength to see them like that, without a leg or an arm; I would rather call them to see how it was going, and they did the same when it happened to me.” There are new victims every week. Since January 1, 79 Colombian nationals have been injured by explosive devices. However, in light of the recent agreement between the government and the FARC on demining, there is hope that the risk of stepping on a mine in Colombia will be reduced substantially. The need for prosthetic devices in Colombia is a consequence of the antipersonnel mines which have killed more than 2,000 people and injured more than 9,000 people since 1990, according to the Colombian government’s Directorate for Comprehensive Action against Antipersonnel Mines (DAICMA). Organizations such as Corporación Matamoros also support wounded Military service members and police officers, as well as their families. Working hand-in-hand with the Ministry of Defense for more than two decades, the organization has provided support to thousands of service members to reintegrate them into society through training and education, which enables them to obtain new employment opportunities. “The idea of becoming a technician was born after my amputation, to meet my own needs. ‘Learn one way or the other,’ I thought, because my financial status wasn’t the best in the world … and on top of that, there are few people in Colombia who do this work well, so I thought the person with the greatest obligation to learn it was me, because I knew best where it hurt me,” he said. “Imagining it is not the same as living it. Being told about someone else’s experience is not the same as experiencing it yourself.” “The idea of becoming a technician was born after my amputation, to meet my own needs. ‘Learn one way or the other,’ I thought, because my financial status wasn’t the best in the world … and on top of that, there are few people in Colombia who do this work well, so I thought the person with the greatest obligation to learn it was me, because I knew best where it hurt me,” he said. “Imagining it is not the same as living it. Being told about someone else’s experience is not the same as experiencing it yourself.” “Some 99.9 percent of a prosthesis’ effectiveness is you,” he said. “If you don’t have good muscle control, if you aren’t in good physical shape, you won’t be able to work the prosthesis. You need training for rehabilitation, but first comes your head, because where there’s a will, there’s a way.” The Soldier explained that his faith was also a key element in speeding up the recovery process. He realized his injury is fundamental to his path in life, which is to help other injured people. Izquierdo now dreams of studying Orthosis and Prosthesis Engineering, so he can use his experience and knowledge to create new systems to improve the quality and access of prostheses for persons. “My goal now is to find financial assistance. There is no such engineering program in Colombia, but there are in Mexico, the United States, Germany, and El Salvador.” In Colombia, domestic-made prostheses start at 500,000 pesos (about $250), but Izquierdo says those are not ideal, because they can cause lesions on the body. Imported prostheses cost more than 200 million pesos ($100,000), but if they were made domestically, they would be much more affordable. Izquierdo survives terrible injury Once he found himself in that very situation, he was determined to get rehabilitation and learn from his own experiences for his benefit and that of other Soldiers who would need help in the future. Just like any other Service Member injured by explosive devices, Izquierdo received treatment from medical specialists and began his rehabilitation at the Military Hospital. The treatment generally lasts six months. last_img read more

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Panic-buying returns as Melbourne braces for lengthy lockdown

first_img“To do otherwise is to pretend that this isn’t real, to pretend that we have other options.”Health authorities say they have linked many of the Melbourne cases to hotels where residents returning from overseas were being quarantined.Local media reported security guards had breached infection control protocols — including allegedly having sex with guests being held in isolation — prompting the government to replace the private contractors with prison staff and launch an inquiry.But there is also concern over the increased community transmission in Melbourne, with just 11 of Wednesday’s new cases linked to known outbreaks.Around 3,000 people in the city have already been locked inside their homes since Saturday in Australia’s strictest coronavirus response to date after a cluster emerged in a high-rise public housing estate.A total of 75 cases have been detected in the densely populated towers during a major testing blitz.Long queues of cars were backed up at Victoria’s border Wednesday after neighboring New South Wales closed the boundary for the first time in the pandemic — essentially sealing off the state from the rest of Australia.The hastily announced decision left residents of border towns scrambling to obtain permits to cross for work or other essential reasons, while school holiday travellers were rushing to return home.Australia has recorded almost 9,000 cases of COVID-19 and 106 deaths from the virus.  The country’s largest supermarket chain, Woolworths, said it had reimposed buying limits on items including pasta, vegetables and sugar after shoppers rushed to stores across Victoria state.Experts have warned that people everywhere will have to get used to the “new normal” of on-and-off restrictions as new clusters emerge and subside, while there are also concerns over the economic and health impacts the measures will bring.Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said the Melbourne lockdown would cost the economy up to Aus$1 billion ($700 million) a week, telling public broadcaster ABC the burden would “fall heavily on businesses”.Restaurants and cafes will be limited to serving takeaway food, while gyms, beauty salons and cinemas will be forced to close again. Residents will be restricted to their homes except for work, exercise, medical care or to buy essentials — a return to social isolation that was only recently lifted.Professor Michael Kyrios, a clinical psychologist at Flinders University, warned that Victoria needed to brace for a “coming mental health crisis” as a result.”This will likely place the mental health care system in a precarious situation with very limited ability to mobilize resources in response to the increased incidence of mental illness arising from the COVID crisis,” he said.State Premier Daniel Andrews on Wednesday acknowledged the costs to Victoria’s 6.6 million residents, saying his job required him “to make not just the popular calls, but the really difficult, the hard calls”.”This is not the situation that anybody wanted to be in but it is the reality that we must confront,” he said. Shoppers in Australia’s second-biggest city stripped supermarket shelves Wednesday as millions in Melbourne prepared for a return to virus lockdown, with warnings the new restrictions will cost the economy Aus$1 billion a week.Five million residents were ordered back into a six-week lockdown beginning midnight Wednesday into Thursday as soaring community transmission of the coronavirus brings more than 100 new cases daily.A further 134 infections were detected in the past 24 hours — small in comparison to the tens of thousands in hard-hit countries like the US and Brazil but considered a major spike in Australia, which had otherwise been successful in containing COVID-19. Topics :last_img read more

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East Jakarta cemetery records highest weekly number of COVID-19 burials since March

first_imgThe Pondok Ranggon cemetery in East Jakarta has recorded the highest number of funerals in a week since its establishment as a COVID-19 burial location in March.Nadi, the cemetery’s management officer, said 213 bodies had been buried under COVID-19 protocol at Pondok Ranggon last week.”Last week, we buried 213 bodies. Previously, we buried an average of 180 bodies per week,” Nadi said on Sunday. However, Nadi said he didn’t know how many of the deceased had been confirmed to be COVID-19 positive.  Nadi explained that his team had buried 29 bodies on Monday last week, 32 on Tuesday, 30 on Wednesday, 40 on Thursday, 27 on Friday, 27 on Saturday and 28 on Sunday.Thursday also saw the highest number of bodies buried under COVID-19 protocol in a day at the cemetery since the pandemic was first confirmed in the country in March.The spike came less than two weeks after the cemetery had announced its previous highest daily burial on Aug. 31 with 36 bodies. Nadi said the Pondok Ranggon cemetery expected to run out of space for COVID-19 graves in October because of the recent increase in the number of burials.”There is only space left for another 1,100 burials in the cemetery’s southern area of 7,000 square meters. The capacity is likely to be critical in mid-October,” Nadi said as quoted by kompas.com.It is estimated that, in October, the remaining land may only accommodate 380 to 400 bodies.As of Monday, Jakarta has recorded 54,864 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 12,440 active cases and 1,410 fatalities. (nal)Topics :last_img read more

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Merkur Switches On

first_imgGE Renewable Energy has completed the handover of the 66 GE Haliade 150-6MW turbines at the Merkur offshore wind farm in Germany.GE is also in charge of carrying out operations and maintenance of the turbines for a period of ten years.To remind, jack-up vessel Seafox 5 installed the last turbine at the project site 45km of the island of Borkum in September last year, shortly after the wind farm produced first power.The 396MW Merkur offshore wind farm is expected to be fully commissioned this year.Merkur Offshore GmbH, a joint venture between Partners Group, InfraRed Capital Partners, DEME Concessions and Coriolis, is the developer and owner of the project.last_img read more

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