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East Jakarta cemetery records highest weekly number of COVID-19 burials since March

first_imgThe Pondok Ranggon cemetery in East Jakarta has recorded the highest number of funerals in a week since its establishment as a COVID-19 burial location in March.Nadi, the cemetery’s management officer, said 213 bodies had been buried under COVID-19 protocol at Pondok Ranggon last week.”Last week, we buried 213 bodies. Previously, we buried an average of 180 bodies per week,” Nadi said on Sunday. However, Nadi said he didn’t know how many of the deceased had been confirmed to be COVID-19 positive.  Nadi explained that his team had buried 29 bodies on Monday last week, 32 on Tuesday, 30 on Wednesday, 40 on Thursday, 27 on Friday, 27 on Saturday and 28 on Sunday.Thursday also saw the highest number of bodies buried under COVID-19 protocol in a day at the cemetery since the pandemic was first confirmed in the country in March.The spike came less than two weeks after the cemetery had announced its previous highest daily burial on Aug. 31 with 36 bodies. Nadi said the Pondok Ranggon cemetery expected to run out of space for COVID-19 graves in October because of the recent increase in the number of burials.”There is only space left for another 1,100 burials in the cemetery’s southern area of 7,000 square meters. The capacity is likely to be critical in mid-October,” Nadi said as quoted by kompas.com.It is estimated that, in October, the remaining land may only accommodate 380 to 400 bodies.As of Monday, Jakarta has recorded 54,864 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 12,440 active cases and 1,410 fatalities. (nal)Topics :last_img read more

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Preventing HIV in World Cup

first_img(Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more free photos, visit the image library.) MEDIA CONTACTS • Wolfgang Eichler Fifa Media Officer +27 11 567 2010 +27 83 2010 471 [email protected] • Delia Fischer Fifa Media Officer +27 11 567 2010 +27 11 567 2524 +27 83 201 0470 fax +27 (0)11 567 2559 [email protected] • Jermaine Craig Media Manager 2010 Fifa World Cup South Africa Local Organising Committee +27 11 567 2010 +27 83 201 0121 [email protected] June and July 2010 South Africa will host the world’s biggest single sporting event – the Fifa World Cup. This will not only give the country a golden opportunity to reach millions of football fans for its business and tourism sectors, but also for its efforts to combat HIV/Aids.Health officials, activists and civil society organisations met in Johannesburg in November to plan how to make the most of the event, which will span 30 days and take place in eight of South Africa’s nine provinces.Recent international media reports have suggested that the World Cup could aggravate the country’s already severe HIV/Aids epidemic, but several speakers saw the event as a chance to address the health crisis, among them former soccer player Ronny Zondi, who represented the Sport and Entertainment Sector of the South African National Aids Council (Sanac), the body coordinating HIV activities linked to the World Cup.Stadiums, fan parks, hotels and bars are all potential venues where HIV prevention messages could be promoted, condoms and pamphlets distributed, and voluntary counselling and HIV testing made available. The need for all the organisations involved to work with each other and Fifa and its local organising committee (LOC) to avoid duplication of efforts and confused messaging was emphasised.LOC chief medical officer Dr Victor Ramathesele urged participants to tap into Fifa’s marketing expertise to push HIV/Aids messages before and during the World Cup.Noluntu Ntloko, from Fifa’s marketing division, briefed participants on restrictions on the use of registered World Cup trademarks, or branding that could conflict with that of its sponsors and commercial partners, and encouraged organisations to channel any planned HIV activities through the LOC.Through its Football for Hope programme, Fifa is already partnering with civil society organisations involved in HIV/Aids initiatives. One such partner, Grassroots Soccer, works with a local NGO, Sonke Gender Justice, to train soccer coaches to teach young people about HIV and Aids.Rather than limiting their efforts to duration of the event, several organisations are planning campaigns that will last the entire year and reach people all over the continent.Wayne Alexander, of Dance4Life, an international initiative that enlists young people to raise awareness about HIV/Aids, told the meeting about Fair Play for Africa, a campaign to mobilise communities to advocate for quality healthcare for all Africans, and to hold their governments accountable for health provision. So far 200 NGOs have committed to getting involved and activities in 12 African countries are planned for 2010.“We have come a long way,” commented Dr Robin Petersen, chair of the Johannesburg meeting, who recalled that when South Africa started planning its World Cup bid 10 years ago, there was pressure to downplay the HIV/Aids epidemic. “We’re now planning to use this event to address one of the most significant crises our country is facing.”Source: Irin PlusNewslast_img read more

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South Africa launches green car project

first_img27 February 2013 A project to pilot and test the feasibility of electric vehicles and associated supporting infrastructure in South African conditions was launched by Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa in Pretoria on Tuesday. It is a multi-stakeholder partnership between primary partners Nissan South Africa and the Environmental Affairs Department, with support from the Departments of Trade and Industry, Transport, Energy, Science and Technology, Eskom and the South African Revenue Services. “The fundamental motivation for embarking on this project is the urgent need for South Africa to transition to a job creating, sustainable, low-carbon and green economy as clearly outlined in the National Development Plan,” Molewa said. The automotive sector is one of South Africa’s most carbon-intensive, currently accounting for approximately 20% of emissions; it is also the third-largest contributor to air pollution in the country. South Africa is a major player in the industry and is the 18th largest manufacturer of vehicles in the world, representing 80% of Africa’s vehicle output, according to Molewa. The need to move towards a more energy-efficient economy presents opportunities for the country, Molewa said.‘Becoming an engine of development’ “The transition to a low-carbon and sustainable economy can create large numbers of green jobs across many sectors of the economy and indeed can become an engine of development,” she said. “To this end the government has already put in place policies to enable this transition that is pro-development, pro-poor and pro-job creation.” These include the national climate change response policy, the Public Enterprise Department’s guidelines for state-owned enterprises, and the electric vehicle industry strategy by the Department of Trade and Industry. “This electric vehicle industry strategy prepares for the future transition into design and production of alternative propulsion systems in order to maintain or increase South Africa’s global market share in the automotive sector while still responding to its commitment to decrease its carbon footprint,” she said. The green car partnership will be informed by the strategy. The initial phase of the project involves four Nissan Leaf test cars being dispatched to the Environmental Affairs Department for three years. “The Leaf is the world’s first mass-produced electric vehicle, which will be launched later this year in South Africa by Nissan as the first car manufacturer to introduce a 100% electric vehicle into the country,” Molewa said. The cars are charged at dual-grid connection charging stations. Looking at the viability of the charging stations and other necessary supporting infrastructure is part of the green car project. Charging the cars is done with a solar tracking device, and the department has just completed the installation of a 15-kilowatt device at its green building in Pretoria. “It is envisaged that in future these tracking devices will be installed on the major commuter routes for the direct charging of vehicles in real time,” she said. “An e-transport location analysis will be conducted in partnership with other government agencies, to inform the roll-out of the solar e-cars installation package at key transportation and commuter hubs countrywide, such as key government precincts, Gautrain stations, OR Tambo, key commercial centres and business districts.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Algeria ready to strengthen trade and industry ties with South Africa

first_imgAlgerian ambassador to South Africa Abd-El-Naceur Belaid called for stronger economic partnerships between Algeria and South Africa at an Algeria-South Africa trade and investment summit held in Johannesburg.Algeria is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea on the north, Morocco, Western Sahara and Mauritania on the west, Mali and Niger on the south, and Libya and Tunisia on the east. It is the largest country on the continent and has a diversity of climate and landforms. (Image: Wikipedia)Chris AndersonBelaid was speaking at a gathering in Johannesburg on 22 March 2017 with members of the South African business community, the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and other groups, organised by Brand South Africa.The ambassador presented an overview of his country’s economic climate, as well as the huge investment opportunities offered to foreign investors and the measures taken by the Algerian government to encourage them.This latest conference followed a visit by South African business representatives to Algeria in December 2016. Reaction on that visit was positive regarding Algeria’s vast investment in infrastructure, the development of strong international relations, and a keen enthusiasm for engaging with good, solid ideas from the rest of Africa.Those at the March 2017 conference who had been part of the earlier visit to Algeria, spoke informally of the exciting growth and potential in the country’s economy, and the government’s desire to make investment and business relationships both easy and beneficial.Not just oilAlgeria is still considered one of the largest and most important producers and exporters of oil and natural gas in the world. While the country had suffered huge losses as a result of the drop in oil prices over the past 10 to 15 years, the Algerian government, said Belaid, had constantly been engaged in creating reforms to cushion the impact of this decline.Traditionally having a state-controlled, more bureaucratic-oriented economy, the country was now actively encouraging a diverse private sector. Relaxed government legislation had allowed for more foreign investment, modern industry diversification and business partnerships.This new model for growth had enabled Algeria to achieve lower national debt and stabilised reserves. Taking note of this, in their latest reports the World Bank and International Monetary Fund forecast that the country’s growth could hit 3.9% in 2017.However, said Belaid, there was still much reputation-building to be done for Algeria.Algeria and North AfricaIn what he diplomatically called a “lack of information” about Algeria and its relation to the often turbulent politics of North Africa, Belaid said that over the past 20 years his government had made a concerted effort to defeat terrorism threats that were prevalent in the country in the 1990s, striving to remain immune to its effects while countries around it went through more troubling times.Realising that solutions to growth were more often than not economic rather than political, the Algerian government would begin a huge campaign of economic development and infrastructure investment, “across the board”, in all sectors of industry, from agriculture and mining, tourism and technology, to industry and finance.Notable Algerian infrastructure investmentsHe highlighted a few infrastructure projects, specifically the Trans-Saharan Highway. It dissected the famous desert that makes up much of the country’s landmass. For centuries, the Sahara remained impenetrable for the economic expansion of Africa, but thanks to the impressive road system built across it, the highway was now “a modern (economic) connection between Europe and Africa, with Algeria as its centre”.A modern port system, outside the capital Algiers, was fast becoming part of the global shipping system – alongside Cape Town and Durban harbours – that connected Europe and Africa with Asian markets.Water infrastructure had been another of Algeria’s favoured investments, with more than 40 dams built over the past 10 years. These had boosted an agriculture sector that would otherwise have been stifled by the desert.The Algerian motor industry was another success. A number of big global names were building manufacturing plants in the country – Volkswagen, Hyundai and Toyota had increased their presence in the industry. Belaid also said there was a large automotive parts manufacturing industry in Algeria.Tourism was also another big focus for the country. Belaid said Algeria, as the largest country in Africa, offered a variety of landforms – mountains, deserts, ocean – and diverse and comfortable climates. While still underdeveloped, Algeria’s rich natural and historical heritages were notable assets for potential investment opportunities.All this potential for development, Belaid said, had made Algeria a progressive player in the global economy, comparable to Europe, as well as a significant African economic power.Today, he said, was a crucial time for his country. “We have the resources, we have built the infrastructure… we now need to develop it further, look at diversification of industry, invest in high value and dynamic ideas.” Some of those ideas included an expansion of Algeria’s digital economy, a focus on renewable energy and emphasis on the financial sector.For more details on Algeria and potential opportunities, click here to read a special feature focusing on the country in the latest issue of Export & Import Southern Africa.Algeria and South AfricaThis is where the relationship with South Africa became so important. As Belaid said, African countries looked to South Africa for that “Madiba magic”, referring to late president Nelson Mandela’s global influence that still permeates the country’s identity even years after his passing.More than just a marketing idea or window dressing, the “magic” still informed how South Africa presented itself to the world, whether it was economically, socially or politically.Algeria, Belaid said, wanted to work with that. Specifically, Algeria admired South Africa’s level of professionalism and competence in the financial sector, industry and digital economy.Joining Belaid for a discussion panel during the conference, representatives from the DTI and the IDC offered plans to support furthering the economic relationship between the two countries.Lerato Matabage, CEO of Trade Invest Africa at the DTI, in particular, highlighted Algeria as the number one priority in North Africa for South African investment. Currently investing R13-billion in the partnership, the DTI wanted to increase this investment by prioritising a much-needed framework update to the current economic agreement with Algeria. It also wanted a more physical presence in the country through the establishment of more sector-specific missions and expanding the DTI presence in Algiers.Matabage wanted South African businesses to take the relationship with Algeria seriously, saying opportunities and potential for growth between the countries were vast and dynamic.Peter Lekhethe, senior development manager at the IDC, emphasised the One Africa ideal for economic growth on the continent.Nation relationships, he said, should focus beyond political differences and boundary issues, and concentrate on building the economic strength of Africa as a whole. With the right policies and removing bureaucratic limitations to trade and investment, doing business in Africa would be easier, simple to implement and beneficial to all parties.Belaid urged potential investors to stay informed about Algeria and understand the differences between it and the rest of North Africa. “Algeria is a beautiful and strong country, with strong economic ideas and a huge potential for developing stronger relationships with South Africa and the rest of the continent. We are open for business,” he concluded. Source: Embassy of Algeria South Africa, Export & Import Southern Africa magazine Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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South Africa gets a mixed reaction in Africa

first_imgResearch into perceptions of South Africa in the rest of Africa found nation brand reputational strengths in culture, music, business sophistication, infrastructure and political management of democratic transitions. But South Africans were also perceived as imposing and aggressive. Petrus de Kock, research manager at Brand South Africa, said initial findings indicated personal interactions in business, social and government settings often left the impression among hosts in other African countries that South Africans were pushy. (Image: Media Club Reporter) • How much do you know about the ocean? • Disabled South Africans: know your rights – Infographic • Frank and honest: the Women On Sex web series • Enactus promotes entrepreneurship, innovation • Sandton goes car-free for a month Ray MaotaThere are mixed perceptions of South Africa in other African countries, according to South Africa Incorporated, or SA Inc, which aims to uncover unique insights to help Brand South Africa to understand the environment in which it operates.The project was created by Brand South Africa as part of its Africa Programme in order to uncover what local businesses face when they trade with and invest in peer countries on the rest of the continent, and when they travel to and live in other African countries.Results of the project were unpacked at research dialogue hosted by Brand South Africa and held at the Gordon Institute for Business Science in Illovo, northern Johannesburg, earlier in the week. The dialogue dissected South Africa’s brand on the continent and its various implications.SA Inc fieldwork was undertaken in 2014/15 in Kenya, Nigeria and Ghana, as well as Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Senegal and Russia in the 2015/16 cycle. One of the insights gained was that perceptions of South Africa and its people could hinder or advance the country’s business progress in the rest of Africa.For example, initial findings indicated personal interactions in business, social and government settings often left the impression among hosts in other African countries that South Africans were pushy, imposing and unwilling to listen to the authentic advice of locals and industry experts, said Petrus de Kock, research manager at Brand South Africa.The country’s National Development Plan, or Vision 2030, which sets out the vision for South Africa, posits expanded trade between South Africa and its peer African countries as a key long-term objective.SOUTH AFRICA AND ITS PEERSAccording to SA Inc, in Nigeria, from a reputational point of view, South Africa has a major influence on several fronts:With more than 150 companies active in the market, South Africa is highly visible and respected in many areas of national competency.South Africa’s democratic transition, institutional and infrastructural profile is appreciated and is often referenced as a key attractiveness feature.Nigerian respondents are keen to interact with and explore opportunities with South Africa for business and investment interactions and for cultural, music, tourism and related experiences.In Kenya, from a reputational point of view, South Africa has a major influence on two fronts:As a result of South Africa’s democratic transition, strong institutions; and,As a result of major interest in South Africa music and culture.FINDINGS ON SOUTH AFRICA’S FOOTPRINT IN KENYA AND NIGERIAUncovering outside perceptions of a nation is key to effectively marketing its brand, particularly for encouraging trade and investment. In July and August 2014, Brand South Africa researchers conducted fieldwork in Kenya and Nigeria to assess those countries’ views of South Africa and its people.It was found that Kenyans largely considered South Africans to be imposing and aggressive.“However, at the opposite end, the country and its people’s general openness is ascribed to an appealing culture and high-level accomplishments in several spheres,” De Kock said. “For example, our political transition and democratisation; the capabilities and range of sectors in the South African economy; South African technical, managerial, manufacturing, engineering, and a host of related practical capabilities – these all impact positively on perceptions of the nation brand.”In Kenya, there was a positive reception for South African products and services, mostly in the food sector, as they were competitively priced and of high quality. According to the SA Inc report, these perceptions stem from comments about how South African managers conduct themselves and treat Kenyans. This affects the reputation of South Africa and South African businesses in Kenya.On the other hand, South African companies’ perceptions of doing business in Kenya were characterised by wariness, a result of several failed attempts to invest in the nation.Perceptions of business and economic ties in Nigeria concluded that while South Africa had significant and diverse investments across a range of sectors in that country, Nigerian business people felt South Africa should be more open to investment from, and trade interaction with, Nigerian companies.CONCLUSIONSThe initial fieldwork findings indicate unique nation brand reputational strengths in areas such as culture, music, business sophistication, infrastructure and political management of democratic transitions.On the negative side, South Africans are perceived as imposing, aggressive, and unwilling to listen to local advice.“From a business perspective it implies that more attention needs to be paid to the manner in which South Africans interact with African peers, and how market entry strategies are designed by incorporating soft factors such as business culture,” De Kock said.From a political point of view, South Africa is seen as progressive, that it has strong institutions, and democratic credentials to underpin its Constitution. However, internal developmental challenges, xenophobia, and misplaced perceptions about African expatriates in South Africa is a cause for concern in Kenya and Nigeria.SOUTH AFRICA AND BRICSBrand South Africa shared a research report, The Ufa Declaration, and its implications for the BRICS brand.Most importantly, the report highlights the successes of BRICS in terms of implementing summit decisions, and the implications increased formalisation and institutionalisation has for the development of the organisation.This is an issue very few analysts have written about, especially in the context of how the development of the organisation is reflecting positively on the global governance capability of the five member states.last_img read more

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VALE – TOUCHWEST PATRON AND OLYMPIC CHAMPION

first_imgBelow is an article from the TouchWest homepage re the loss of Shirley de la Hunty. Olympic track and field champion and TouchWest patron Shirley de la Hunty has passed away at her Perth home aged 78. A winner of seven Olympic medals, including three gold medals, Shirley was always thrilled to attend recent TouchWest State Championships and schools Touch events. She was without question one of WA’s finest sports people of all time. All the members of TouchWest pass on our sympathy to the family of Shirley de la Hunty.last_img read more

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22 days agoJuan Mata adamant trophies not far away for Man Utd

first_imgJuan Mata adamant trophies not far away for Man Utdby Ansser Sadiq22 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveJuan Mata says it won’t be long until Manchester United win trophies again. The Premier League’s leading title winners went trophy-less last season.”I think when the club and the manager said we would take time we believe it’s not going to be too long,” said Mata before Thursday’s Europa League clash with AZ Alkmaar.”I think this club is always winning and he has won here a lot as a player. I have won a few things here and in my mind is to win something really important with United. “I believe we can do it, we know other teams are playing very good football and now in the last part of my career my biggest thing is to win.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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TPDCo Expanding Team Jamaica Programme

first_img In a bid to increasing accessibility, the TPDCo has, since February, collaborated with individuals classified as approved training partners (ATP) to assist in the continued training of industry personnel. Story Highlights The Tourism Product Development Company (TPDCo) has expanded its Team Jamaica programme to make it more accessible and attractive to industry stakeholders.center_img The Tourism Product Development Company (TPDCo) has expanded its Team Jamaica programme to make it more accessible and attractive to industry stakeholders.Team Jamaica is a mandatory training and certification programme for persons employed in or otherwise associated with the hospitality and tourism industry.The programme’s main components include customer service, product knowledge, culture and environmental awareness.In a bid to increasing accessibility, the TPDCo has, since February, collaborated with individuals classified as approved training partners (ATP) to assist in the continued training of industry personnel.While noting that the programme is being conducted solely by TPDCo’s training department, Executive Director, Dr. Andrew Spencer, said the partnership allowed the ATPs to participate in a ‘train the trainers’ programme.This has resulted in their being certified to deliver the programme on TPDCo’s behalf, he said during a Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Think Tank at the agency’s head office in Kingston on Tuesday, August 29.There are currently 20 ATPs operating in the island’s resort areas. Seven are based in Kingston, one on the south coast, four in Ocho Rios, six in Montego Bay; and two in Negril.Dr. Spencer said come 2018, TPDCo will be engaging HEART Trust/NTA and several hotels to become certified trainers and deliver the programme at their entities and institutions.Additionally, he said TPDCo will shortly introduce levels two and three of the Team Jamaica programme, which are the advanced components of its current offering.“Right now, we only have one level, which is providing basic information about the tourism industry, ensuring that individuals are aware of the history of the development of the industry. So for levels two and three, we plan to get into greater depth,” the Executive Director explained.Additionally, he said the advanced levels will allow persons to become more adept at their jobs and provide an avenue for individuals to matriculate at the Jamaica Centre for Tourism and Innovation (JCTI).The centre aims to create a certified workforce based on academic skills and competence.It will serve to accelerate the transformation of tourism enterprises by engaging institutions and persons to initiate new ideas as well as harness science and technology to transfer knowledge into practice within the sector.The facility will offer a practical curriculum that complements existing hospitality programmes at several tertiary institutions.Its programmes will target aspiring supervisors, managers and other hospitality professionals in areas such as culinary, spa and hospitality management.Team Jamaica has evolved since its inception in 1997 and is now a benchmark for tourism-awareness programmes within the Caribbean.Dr. Spencer noted that the programme is quite beneficial to the workers, sector and country on the whole, in the creation of a well-trained workforce that attracts investments while increasing skills levels, economic growth and prosperity.last_img read more

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